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10 best free video streaming services for cord cutters

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Streaming killed the Blu-Ray
Samsung is discontinuing its Blu-ray and 4K Blu-ray player lines. That’s lousy news for people who love older TV shows and movies.

When cord-cutting became a thing, it was all about saving money. Today, cord-cutting costs are catching up with cable. Indeed, with Disney Plus coming, with its must-watch package of Marvel Universe, Star Wars, and Disney films, plus internet TV streaming services like AT&T DirecTV Now drastically raising its prices, I can easily see a cord cutter’s total viewing bill crossing the $100-a-month barrier. 

Fortunately, there are some answers.

There’s at least one inexpensive TV-bundling service: Philo TV. At $16 a month for three simultaneous streams of 45 popular channels, it’s a steal. But, if you can live with commercials, there are at least 10 good free streaming services to try.

Cord cutting on the cheap

First, get a Roku

To access most of these streaming servcies, you’ll need an up-to-date Roku streaming device. A big reason why I recommend Roku is it gives you access to more online-streaming services than any of the others. To find these, check out the Roku Channel Store

For example, if you can’t put up a TV antenna for over-the-air (OTA) shows, many stations have their own local news Roku apps. These include FOX25 Boston, WSB Atlanta, and WGN Chicago.

In addition, there are literally hundreds of more obscure channels. Want to stream stuff for your cat? Your dog? Want to watch 50s TV shows? Practice yoga? Follow technology news with CNET? It’s all there — and it’s all free.

Next, try private channels

There are also private Roku channels, which are not listed on the Roku Channel Store. To add these, you’ll must manually enter their channel access codes. The best of these let you watch The Internet Archive’s public domain videos. The best known of private channel had been Nowhere TV with a hodgepodge of content, but it’s no longer available in the US.

While private channels can be fun, be wary of them. Roku doesn’t support or vet these networks. Some content may be pirated, or they may disappear from one day to another.

Now check out these free streaming services

The networks below are legal, stable, and will likely to be available for years to come.

Hoopla and Kanopy

The first two — Hoopla and Kanopy — require you to have a library card with a library system that supports either of them. Their offerings aren’t quite identical, but they both offer high-end movies and documentaries. They also come with a lot of PBS titles and The Great Courses (a personal favorite). Hoopla also offers ebooks and music, while Kanopy comes with movies from the Criterion Collection.

Unfortunately, you probably can’t get both services. Darn it!

Crackle

Crackle is perhaps the best-known free streaming TV and movie service. Sponsored by Sony, Crackle boasts TV shows and movies from the 80s through the 00s. You’ll also find newer films on it sometimes, as well as bit of original content such as StartUp, a dark show about technology companies. Call it organized crime 2.0. It’s a hidden gem of a show with actors such as Martin Freedman, Ronald Perlman, and Adam Brody. Give Crackle and StartUp a try.

IMDb Freedive

Everyone knows about Amazon Prime Video. It’s a great add-on if you’re already an Amazon Prime customer. But, did you know Amazon also offers a commercial-driven free video service? Well, now you do. It’s IMDb Freedive. This is a video-on-demand (VoD) service. It features older TV shows including Fringe, Heroes, The Bachelor, and Without a Trace and commercial movies such as Awakenings, Memento, Monster, The Illusionist, and Groundhog Day.

IMDb Freedrive is only available in the US. It’s also the only free channel not available on Roku. You can either watch it on your computer or with an Amazon Fire TV device.

FilmRise

For another good free VoD network check out FilmRise. Its movies tend to be more obscure, but it offers a good selection of popular TV shows such as Third Rock from the Sun, Cybill, and Roseanne.

Pluto TV

You may already know about Pluto TV. If offers access to dozens of other streaming networks with a single interface. Some of these “channels” aren’t that interesting, but then, there are others, like Mystery Science Theater 3000 (classic MST3K shows), The Onion, and RiffTrax, which bring a smile to my face. Give it a look. I’ll bet you’ll find something you like, too.

Viacom is buying Pluto TV, however, so I’m not sure how much longer Pluto TV will be free.

The Roku Channel

Roku is also offering its own network now: The Roku Channel. It borrows free movies and TV shows from other streaming networks and its own free content. It offers a mix of older and current TV shows and films. One interesting twist is you can watch these not only with your Roku but on the web via  The Roku Channel for the web.

Tubi TV

TubI TV is one of the better free VoD services. It comes with perhaps the biggest video library, with 7,000 titles. That’s thanks to its access to Lionsgate, MGM, Paramount Pictures, and Starz Digital’s libraries. If you register, which I recommend you do, you can resume play from where you stopped to let in the cat. For a free service, that’s a nice benefit.

Vudu

You probably know Vudu as Walmart’s online rental VoD service. What you probably didn’t know is it also offers free movies and shows, with commercials. These are usually older shows  (21 Jump Street and WildFire) and movies (National Lampoon Vacation, Gods of Egypt). But, for free, what’s to argue with?

Xumo

Finally, Xumo is a lot like Pluto TV. It others a wide variety of networks with an even wider variety of shows. If you’re a golfer, you’ll like that Xumo is the first network to carry the  PGA Tour’ new streaming channel. One nice feature is that as it learns what shows you like and offers you selections it believes you’ll want to watch.

Yes, you do have to put up with commercials on all of these — and there’s no DVR features to be seen. But, they are free, and with so many selections to choose from, I can guarantee you’ll find something to watch that won’t hurt your pocketbook by even a single penny.

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2022 BMW M8 Competition range revealed with bigger screens and better lights

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German automaker BMW has updated its 2022 M8 Competition sport-luxury car. You can still get an M8 Competition in three body styles (2-door Coupe, 2-door Cabriolet, and 4-door Gran Coupe), sharing the same 4.4-liter twin-turbocharged V8 engine with 617 horsepower and 553 pound-feet of torque.

Images: BMW AG
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Tesla Cybertruck delayed again plus Elon Musk squashes $25k EV rumors

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Tesla closed out 2021 with a bumper year, besting Q4 estimates and pushing EV deliveries past 300,000, though Elon Musk tempered hopes for the arrival of the Cybertruck and more affordable models. Revenue in the year as a whole grew 71%, Tesla announced, describing 2021 as “a breakthrough year” for the automaker, but some of the most anticipated electric vehicles are still some way out.

Tesla

No Tesla Cybertruck until 2023

The most conspicuous project that Tesla has underway is undoubtedly the Cybertruck. The oddly-shaped all-electric pickup proved controversial when Elon Musk first revealed it, and glimpses of development prototypes in the intervening years haven’t dimmed its ability to polarize opinion. Undoubtedly the most frequently-asked question, however, is when Tesla actually might put the Cybertruck into production.

Tesla

Tesla’s investor deck continues with the same, vague timeline as has been stated in previous releases. “We are making progress on the industrialization of Cybertruck, which is currently planned for Austin production subsequent to Model Y,” the automaker says.

Speaking on the investor call, however, Musk confirmed that the Cybertruck wouldn’t go into production this year. The primary focus for Tesla, the CEO explained, would be ramping production of its existing models, like the popular Model 3 and Model Y. They’re still in strong demand, with orders for some configurations of Model Y not expected to be delivered until August 2022.

Tesla Cybertruck pricing

Tesla screenshot by SlashGear

For the Cybertruck, there are still technological hurdles to be worked through, Musk admitted. The automaker is also still trying to figure out how to make it affordable: there was widespread surprise when Tesla announced the full-size electric pickup would have a starting price of around $40,000 when it began taking reservations in late 2019. For the moment, Musk said, the hope is that production can begin sometime in 2023.

Don’t expect the Tesla Roadster any time soon, either

What goes for the Cybertruck, also goes for Tesla’s rebooted Roadster. Also the spur of no shortage of reservation deposits – or the full $250,000 apiece in advance for those wanting one of the first 1,000 “Founder’s Series” cars – the Roadster was originally intended to go into production in mid to late 2021. That was delayed to 2022, and then to 2023.

Tesla Roadster

Tesla

The good news is that it’s still, apparently, on track for that timescale, though as Tesla feels the impact of the supply chain issues affecting the whole auto industry that could still change in the meantime. Chip constraints were name-checked by Musk as being a primary bottleneck for 2021 production of its cars, arguing that if Tesla tried to introduce new models in 2022 it would only have the overall impact of cutting total production output. The need to assign resources to new models would take away from the ability to build cars like the Model 3 and Model Y, he pointed out.

Engineering and tooling-up for the upcoming Tesla models may still begin in 2022. However they won’t go into production until 2023 at the earliest.

The $25,000 Tesla isn’t happening

Tesla line-up

Tesla

Though Tesla hasn’t been affected by the “market adjustments” that have seen dealers of other brands add thousands or even tens of thousands to the sticker price of a new car, it’s clear that the EV-maker is still focused on the trims with the biggest profit margins. Despite previous chatter of a $25,000 Tesla that could undercut even the most affordable Model 3, Musk says that’s simply not on the cards.

“We have too much on our plate,” the CEO said during the investor call.

The reality is, while Tesla has been surprisingly well placed for dealing with the supply chain crunch – including making admirable use of existing chip supplies by reprogramming its software to suit – like most car companies it can’t build as many as it would like to. Focusing on maximizing the return on each vehicle is the inevitable result, not only by prioritizing the more expensive configurations, but on post-sale software enhancements too. Indeed, “over time, we expect our hardware-related profits to be accompanied with an acceleration of software-related profits,” the investor deck points out.

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This carbon 3D-printed Rolls-Royce Cullinan is a $500,000 upgrade

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The Cullinan is the Rolls-Royce of SUVs, so what does this make 1016 Industries’ carbon-fiber, 3D-printed Cullinan? You can call it anything you like, but it is indeed a dignified way to go sporty. We highly prefer it over the quirky Mansory Rolls-Royce Cullinan unveiled last year for the 50th founding anniversary of the United Arab Emirates, and it’s all thanks to the crafty use of 3D printing for the details.

Images: 1016 Industries
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