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5G needed to ease 4G LTE congestion: OpenSignal

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(Image: OpenSignal)

Download speeds across 4G LTE mobile networks “vary tremendously” during the day due to increasing congestion, a new report from OpenSignal has said, with 5G networks primed to ease this traffic.

“Across 77 countries studied, 4G download speeds are between 31.2 Mbps and 5.8 Mbps faster at the best hour of day compared with the slowest hour of the day,” the mobile analytics company’s report said.

“5G will add new capacities to help with these wide time-of-day speed variations … 5G won’t just deliver faster speeds; 5G will provide a blanket of capacity, built using new high-bandwidth, high-frequency spectrum bands that will help mitigate the daily cycle of congestion we see on today’s 4G networks. These 5G services will support more simultaneous users at very fast speeds.

“Even the fastest 4G countries need 5G to counter big drops in speeds at busy times.”

According to the report, during the fastest hour of the day, Australia ranked seventh globally with 4G speeds of 50.3Mbps.

Ahead of Australia were South Korea and Switzerland, with both around the 55Mbps mark; the Netherlands and Singapore at around 54Mbps; and Norway and Denmark, at 53Mbps. New Zealand sat in ninth place, at fastest hour speeds of 45Mbps; and Canada in 10th, at 43Mbps.

Trailing these countries was the UK in 30th place, with close to 35Mbps speeds during the fastest hour of the day; and the United States in 47th, with speeds of almost 29Mbps.

In comparison of fastest hour speeds, Australia ranked fifth on average 4G speeds with just over 38Mbps. South Korea, Singapore, Norway, and the Netherlands scored 47Mbps, 45Mbps, 44Mbps, and 43Mbps, respectively, to round out the top five.

Canada was just under 38Mbps; Denmark at 37Mbps; New Zealand and Switzerland around 36Mbps; the UK at 22.5Mbps; and the US at 18Mbps.

“The US will be an interesting bellwether of 5G’s impact on congestion and speed consistency because it sits smack dab in the middle rank of countries for average 4G download speeds and in its range of speed variation by time of day,” OpenSignal said.

“Any improvements we see in the US mobile consumer experience due to 5G, we’ll likely see reflected in many other parts of the world.”

The times at which 4G download speeds are slowest also vary between countries, with the Netherlands reported as seeing its slowest speeds at 4pm; the UK at 5pm; Singapore and Norway at 6pm; Switzerland and the US at 8pm; Australia, New Zealand, and Denmark at 9pm; Canada at 10pm; and South Korea at 11pm.

Cities will benefit the most from 5G, according to OpenSignal, because this is where users see the most widely varying speeds throughout the day. For instance, Sydney sees fastest hour speeds of 56Mbps, average speeds of around 41Mbps, and slowest hour speeds of 33Mbps.

Similarly, Seoul has fastest hour speeds of 59Mbps, average speeds of 48Mbps, and slowest hour speeds of just under 41Mbps.

“Cities often have the latest 4G technologies deployed, and so should deliver the fastest speeds. And our measurements show they do, but only in the late hours night, when most users aren’t seeking a fast mobile experience. During the day and evening, speeds drop dramatically, highlighting the failure of current 4G networks to deliver a consistent experience,” OpenSignal said.

“Many of the new 5G-only spectrum bands are ideally suited to cities — such as mmWave — because of their short range and extremely high capacities.

“The new 5G bands will open up hundreds of megahertz of new extremely high-frequency spectrum for mobile broadband use, delivering much greater capacity to minimise the effect of congestion.”

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How To Build Your Own Retro Gaming Console With A Raspberry Pi

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Once your micro SD card is mounted with RetroPie, you can plug it into your fully assembled Raspberry Pi 4 and begin the setup process in the software menu that appears. Make sure your controller is nearby, as you’ll need it during the first boot process. If you’re using a USB controller, make sure it’s connected physically, then follow the instructions on-screen.

If you’re using a Bluetooth controller, tap F4 on your USB keyboard to exit back into the Linux command prompt screen, then type and execute the command “sudo ~/RetroPie-S etup/retropie-setup.sh” that loads you into a backend RetroPie menu. Navigate to the Bluetooth option and then open it to begin searching for a controller. Set your Bluetooth controller to sync mode, then pair it in the menu. Return to the Linux command prompt and type the command “sudo shutdown -r now”. Upon loading back into RetroPie, you should be able to use your Bluetooth controller by simply turning it on and following the on-screen menu. Once everything is complete, you’ll end up on another menu with the option RASPI-CONFIG, which you should now select.

Upon tapping that option, you’ll be taken to the main configuration menu for RetroPie, which includes all sorts of different settings. Go ahead and configure whichever settings you need. It’s also a good idea to navigate to Advanced Settings and disable Overscan if you’re using an HDTV. From here, you should be able to load your ROMs (stored on your SD card) and play them from the menu that appears when you boot up RetroPie. Check out the RetroPie documentation for troubleshooting any issues you may encounter, and happy gaming!

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Today’s Wordle Answer #377 – July 1, 2022 Word Solution And Hints

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The solution for the July 1, 2022, edition of Wordle is pinto. It made its way to the English vocabulary from the Spanish word pinto, which refers to a subject that is spotted or mottled. Horses with a patchy coloration, especially those rocking white patches, are affectionately known as pinto.

The word traces its etymological roots to the Latin term pinctus, which is used to describe something that has been painted over. The pinto bean, which is a staple in Mexican, Spanish, and Brazilian cuisines, also gets its name from the patchy color profile of its outer skin. According to Ancestry data, Pinto is a popular Catalan name that eventually made its way to the Indian subcontinent with the advent of Portuguese invaders.

Interestingly, it is also used to describe a person with greying hair, something pop culture describes as a salt-and-pepper look. You can trace the history of Pinto family migration across the U.S. and Canada in the 19th century here. As for famous personalities with that surname, the actress described above is Freida Pinto, while the footballer in question is José Manuel Pinto. Meanwhile, Fernão Mendes Pinto was a renowned Portuguese explorer and writer who also has a crater on the planet Mercury named after him.

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This New $6 Raspberry Pi Is The Computer The DIY Smart Home Needs

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In terms of hardware, the Raspberry Pi Pico W is identical to its predecessor; it sports the same RP2040 Arm Cortex M0+ Dual-Core SoC, which is based on TSMC’s 40nm low power manufacturing process. This chip clocks up to 133MHz and also packs in 264KB of SRAM. There is 2MB of onboard flash storage thrown in, as well. Additionally, the machine features a 40-pin GPIO just like the original Pico from 2021. The onboard micro USB controller can be used for data transfer and receiving power.

The Wi-Fi module on the Raspberry Pi Pico is the Infineon CYW43439 wireless that, apart from supporting 2.4GHz Wi-Fi networks, also adds Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low-Energy support. However, as of now, Raspberry has chosen not to enable Bluetooth capability in the machine. The company does not rule out the possibility of enabling Bluetooth further down the line, though.

With over 2 million Raspberry Pi Pico boards in the hands of consumers, the company expects its new model to enjoy similar success. The company also believes that the ongoing chip shortage has been among the prime reasons for the popularity of the RP2040-based Raspberry Pi Pico. The Pico W, thanks to its newfound wireless capability, will continue to be a great product that can power many IoT-based applications and DIY smart home needs. With a price tag of $6, the Raspberry Pi Pico W costs just $2 more than its predecessor. As the ecosystem for starter microcontrollers evolves, the $6 you spend on the Pico W will definitely be a worthwhile investment.

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