Connect with us

Tech News

Apple Watch “Explorer Edition” with rugged case reportedly in works

Published

on

Apple is reportedly considering a rugged Apple Watch, a tougher version of its watchOS wearable that could better target buyers into extreme sports or who simply prefer the aesthetic of that market. The current Apple Watch Series 6 is water resistant to 50 meters, though its display cover glass is as susceptible to bumps and cracks as most day-wear watches.

Indeed, the design of the Apple Watch has stayed pretty consistent through its multiple generations. The company bucked prevailing trends for circular displays back in 2015, when it revealed the first-generation Apple Watch, opting instead for a square screen in a casing with softly rounded edges.

It’s been a hit since then, of course, not to mention inspired several other companies to adopt similar design. The range has grown, too, with the Apple Watch SE offering a more affordable array of features. However, it also sticks with the current design.

That could change, however. Apple is internally discussing another Apple Watch design, Bloomberg reports, which would have a rugged casing. It would sit alongside, rather than replacing, the current Apple Watch and Apple Watch SE lines, much in the way that the Cupertino firm collaborates with other companies like Nike on special editions.

Internally – but unofficially – known as the Apple Watch Explorer Edition, at least by some, it’s said, the watch would not differ from its siblings in functionality. That would imply the same combination of notifications, health and fitness tracking, and standalone messaging support. It also seems likely that Apple would offer cellular-connected variants, as it does with the current range, so that wearers could leave their iPhone behind but still stay connected.

The difference would be the ruggedized casing, though details on that are scant at this stage. The most obvious route would be rubber cladding and chunky bumpers, much in the way that Casio G-Shock watches and similar have protruding cases that help protect screens from inadvertent knocks, and buttons from accidental presses.

It’s a fairly obvious strategy for Apple to take, given the perennial success of the Apple Watch and its potential to spawn a whole new series of accessories. One of the most obvious improvements over traditional watches of Apple’s design has been the easily-interchanged straps and bands, with Apple offering multiple styles of its own and a healthy third-party market of alternatives on offer. An Apple Watch Explorer Edition could expand that market to cover more rugged, outdoor- and activity-specific options.

According to the leaks, the currently-discussed timeline for the new smartwatch is late 2021 or early 2022. However, as always, Apple could decide not to put the plan into action, and shelve the new watch. We’re expecting to see the Apple Watch Series 7 launch later in 2021, updating the current model with new features including expanding swim tracking support. There have also been reports that Apple is looking to add blood sugar measurements to the new smartwatch.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Android 12L Beta 1 released: Big screen features for all

Published

on

Today Google released the latest version of Android with Android 12L Beta 1, made ready for all intrepid Android-running smart device users to see the future. This is not the first time we’ve seen this software, but it is the first time we’ve seen the software available in the Android Beta program for just about anyone who’ll give it a shot. This version of the software can be found on the Android Beta website and through Google’s developer portal.

This software is a sort of half-step between Android 12 and Android 13. This is an operating system update that’ll work on all devices, but adds functionality and features specifically tuned for large-screen devices and devices with transforming displays. Foldables and rollable display devices will not be passed over by Android!

If you’re testing this software on a device with a large screen, you’ll find a new taskbar for easy app switching. This new taskbar also allows the user to easily drag and drop apps for split-screen mode functionality. Large-screen devices have UI refinements as well, with a focus on usability for overview, lockscreen, quick settings, notifications, and home screens.

This new software is optimized for large screen devices. Developers were given APIs and tools to “help build for large screens” with Android. This included material patterns for large screens, Jetpack Compose for adaptive UI, Window Size Classes for UI management, Activity embedding APIs, a resizeable emulator, and visual linting in Android Studio (with Android Studio Chipmunk).

You do not need a large-screen device to enroll in the Beta program for Android 12L. If you head over to the Android Beta for Pixel site, you’ll see the devices that’ll be able to run this Beta software. Most any Pixel device Pixel 3a or newer should be able to run this Android 12L Beta build.

If you own a Lenovo Tab P12 Pro, you can give Android 12L Developer Preview a try right now. There’s a Lenovo P12 Pro Android 12L Developer Preview Program available for tapping right this minute. This includes Security Patch 2021-11-01 and Android 12L DP1.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Tile tracker prospective buyer Life360 accused of selling location data

Published

on

Many people who have caught a whiff of the many privacy issues in this digital age may presume that it all revolves around social media. The rather horrifying truth is that almost anything about a person that can be transmitted in a digital manner can be used to create a profile of that person, often for targeted marketing purposes. That especially includes the places you’ve been to, which is why location tracking has been a very thorny subject as far as privacy issues go. That’s why it’s a bit worrying that the popular Bluetooth tracker Tile might be acquired by a company that is now allegedly violating its own users’ privacy, which is ironic given the nature of Life360’s business.

Image Credit: Tile

READ: After trying Apple’s AirTag I can see why Tile is furious

Life360 might not be a familiar name to many people, but it has built a reputation around helping families keep track of one another, often with the goal of ensuring their safety. The app comes in handy in making sure kids are where they should be or that family members can send SOS messages in an emergency. These features obviously require some form of location tracking as well as some expectations of privacy.

A lengthy report from The Markup, however, casts some doubt on the latter. Former Life360 employees claim that the company basically sells the location data of its users to almost anyone for the right price. It even partnered with the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to track “mobility trends” during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Life365

Most of Life360’s customers, however, are involved in the advertising industry, providing insights for use with targeted advertising. Company founder and CEO Chris Hulls admits that they see this data as an important part of their business model but that they have privacy policies in place that prevent personally identifiable information (PII) from leaking to its clients. Life360 also credits this business model for allowing them to offer free life-saving services like driver safety.

Complicating matters, however, is Life360’s intent to acquire Tile, one of the most popular brands of Bluetooth trackers in the market today. With Apple’s AirTag and Samsung’s SmartTag, that market has seen a renewed interest as well as more intense scrutiny from privacy advocates and regulators.

The report, while not exactly damning, could put a dent in Life360’s plans. According to The Markup, Hulls said Life360 “doesn’t have plans” to sell Tile tracker data.

Regardless of those privacy policies, the mere thought that Life360, a service aimed at families with kids, deals heavily in the data-selling business is enough to raise red flags. Without many external safeguards in place, there is almost no telling how much information its partners are able to glean from the precise location data that it sells. Security and privacy experts have argued that even anonymized data can still be used to build a profile of an individual for targeted advertising, which can then be used to harvest other information from other sources (via Nature).

Continue Reading

Tech News

Instagram parental controls about to change the way you browse

Published

on

Although Meta itself is no stranger to controversy and legal inquiries, it was Instagram that was put on the hot seat a few months back for the way it treated its younger users. From accusations of trying to profit at the expense of teens’ mental health to criticisms for lack of parental control, Instagram has been painted recently as an unsafe place for young people to be, despite its popularity with that demographic. The social network has tried to recover from that bad PR and is now announcing features to reassure parents, but some of those won’t be rolling out until next year.

Image Credit: Instagram

For Parents

Instagram isn’t new to the social networking game, and the bulk of its users come from younger generations. You’d think that, at this point, it would already have safety measures in place to let parents safeguard kids, but that was definitely not the case. To be fair, it wasn’t until recently that Instagram officially allowed minors in, but it should have had provisions ready for that situation.

Image Credit: Instagram

Better late than never, as some might say, and parental controls are finally coming to Instagram. The catch is that it won’t be until March next year before these parental controls become available. When it does, parents will finally have a say on how much time they want their kids to spend on Instagram. The company is also building an educational hub for parents that will probably try to ease their worries about the network’s impact on their children’s mental health.

For Teens

Parents won’t have to wait long for one promised feature, though. Starting today, teenage users from the US, the UK, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia will be nudged to take a break every now and then when they’ve been scrolling through their feeds for too long. Although it’s too easy to dismiss these notifications, Instagram hints it will be a little persistent and almost nagging in reminding young users to leave that setting enabled.

Image Credit: Instagram

Instagram is also improving on limitations specific to teens’ accounts. For example, other people won’t be able to tag them in posts if the teens don’t follow those accounts. The network’s “Limit Even More” option for controlling sensitive content might also filter out potentially harmful search results, though this feature is still in its early testing stage.

For Everyone

There are also features being tested that will benefit not just teens but all users of all ages. Instagram is testing a new tool that will let users manage their activity better, like bulk deleting content, including previous likes and comments. If all goes well, this will be available in January.

Image Credit: Instagram

The social network is also preparing a “nudge” to remind users to look at other topics if they’ve been staring or searching for a single one for far too long. It’s almost like the “Take a Break” feature but focused on certain topics that can become an unhealthy obsession, especially if the subject matter can be deemed to be potentially harmful.

Continue Reading

Trending