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Apple’s smug new iPhone ad says privacy matters, just weeks after FaceTime bug fail

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Apple disables FaceTime after serious security flaw found
Apple iPhone users discovered a serious FaceTime bug that lets you hear audio from another iPhone or even view live video without the recipient’s knowledge.

Apple has released a new iPhone TV ad that puts the question of privacy center stage, emphasizing to people that ‘Privacy Matters’ in life and therefore that it matters on the device where your life is stored.  

The ad is available to view on YouTube but will be airing on prime time TV slots in the US throughout March before being shown in some other international markets. 

Apple offers a non-technical explanation of privacy through real-life scenarios that are meant to remind viewers why privacy on a phone matters. 

The scenes include two men in a cafe discussing something and then pausing when a waitress arrives to take away their plates. That’s followed by a series of shutting doors, a man hesitating over which urinal to pick, a girl eating her paper note when a teacher asks to see it, lots of locks, and a woman who’s applying makeup closing her car window after she realizes a man in the car beside hers is watching. 

“If privacy matters in your life it should matter to the phone your life is on,” the ad states. “Privacy. That’s iPhone.”

It’s the same theme and tone as the billboard Apple put up outside the CES 2019 tech conference in Las Vegas, which stated: “What happens on your iPhone, stays on your iPhone.”

The ‘privacy matters’ ad of course comes on the heels of the huge privacy bug in the Group FaceTime feature, which let other FaceTime users eavesdrop on fellow iPhone owners.  

SEE: IT pro’s guide to the evolution and impact of 5G technology (free PDF)    

Apple offers a more technical take on what privacy translates to on the iPhone beneath the ad, as well as a link to Apple’s page explaining how Apple products protect user privacy. 

“From encrypting your iMessage conversations, or not keeping a history of your routes in Maps, to limiting tracking across sites with Safari. iPhone is designed to protect your information.”  

The ad is meant to differentiate Apple from ad-driven businesses like Google and Facebook, which depend on collecting and using private data. 

It’s also in line with a number of speeches Apple CEO Tim Cook has made in the past year on the importance of privacy. He told a group of European privacy regulators in October that a “data industrial complex” had emerged around online personal data that was weaponized and used against users with “military efficiency”.

Previous and related coverage

Apple: iPhone’s Group FaceTime isn’t working as it did before eavesdrop bug fix

Apple confirms that Group FaceTime ‘add person’ feature is hobbled after eavesdropping patch in iOS 12.1.4.

Apple’s Tim Cook: Our personal data is ‘weaponized against us’ by you-know-who

Apple’s Tim Cook calls on the US to introduce equivalent laws to Europe’s GDPR privacy regulations.

iPhone Facetime eavesdrop bug: Now lawmakers demand answers from Apple

Apple accused of not being transparent about its response to the Group FaceTime eavesdropping bug.

iPhone snooping: Apple cracks down on apps that secretly record taps, keystrokes

iOS app developers have been capturing how users interact with screens without gaining user consent.

iPhone FaceTime bug: Now Apple sued over eavesdrop on lawyer’s client phone call

Apple sued over FaceTime eavesdropping bug and faces criticism for not responding to bug reports.

Apple apologizes for FaceTime eavesdropping bug, update coming next week

Group FaceTime calls are currently disabled for all users through the server, and a software update will arrive next week to completely fix the issue.

Severe vulnerability in Apple FaceTime found by Fortnite player

The teen’s mother attempted to contact Apple with no success.

Apple disables Group FaceTime function that was allowing callers to listen and view without your consent

Apple iPhone users discovered a serious FaceTime bug that lets you hear audio from another iPhone or even view live video without the recipient’s knowledge.

iOS 12.1.1 is now available, fixes an annoying FaceTime feature

The update includes bug fixes and FaceTime improvements.

Apple FaceTime bug prompts investigation from NY attorney general CNET

The probe is focused on Apple’s response to the eavesdropping vulnerability.

How Apple Group FaceTime could replace Google Hangouts Chat and Skype for Business TechRepublic

At WWDC, Apple announced a new feature for iOS 12 that will allow FaceTime to accommodate up to 32 people at once. This could make Apple a contender in the enterprise video conferencing realm.

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Facebook is testing pop-up messages telling people to read a link before they share it – TechCrunch

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Years after popping open a pandora’s box of bad behavior, social media companies are trying to figure out subtle ways to reshape how people use their platforms.

Following Twitter’s lead, Facebook is trying out a new feature designed to encourage users to read a link before sharing it. The test will reach 6 percent of Facebook’s Android users globally in a gradual rollout that aims to encourage “informed sharing” of news stories on the platform.

Users can still easily click through to share a given story, but the idea is that by adding friction to the experience, people might rethink their original impulses to share the kind of inflammatory content that currently dominates on the platform.

Twitter introduced prompts urging users to read a link before retweeting it last June and the company quickly found the test feature to be successful, expanding it to more users.

Facebook began trying out more prompts like this last year. Last June, the company rolled out pop-up messages to warn users before they share any content that’s more than 90 days old in an an effort to cut down on misleading stories taken out of their original context.

At the time, Facebook said it was looking at other pop-up prompts to cut down on some kinds of misinformation. A few months later, Facebook rolled out similar pop-up messages that noted the date and the source of any links they share related to COVID-19.

The strategy demonstrates Facebook’s preference for a passive strategy of nudging people away from misinformation and toward its own verified resources on hot button issues like COVID-19 and the 2020 election.

While the jury is still out on how much of an impact this kind of gentle behavioral shaping can make on the misinformation epidemic, both Twitter and Facebook have also explored prompts that discourage users from posting abusive comments.

Pop-up messages that give users a sense that their bad behavior is being observed might be where more automated moderation is headed on social platforms. While users would probably be far better served by social media companies scrapping their misinformation and abuse-ridden existing platforms and rebuilding them more thoughtfully from the ground up, small behavioral nudges will have to do.

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State AGs tell Facebook to scrap Instagram for kids plans – TechCrunch

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In a new letter, attorneys general representing 44 U.S. states and territories are pressuring Facebook to walk away from new plans to open Instagram to children. The company is working on an age-gated version of Instagram for kids under the age of 13 that would lure in young users who are currently not permitted to use the app, which was designed for adults.

“It appears that Facebook is not responding to a need, but instead creating one, as this platform appeals primarily to children who otherwise do not or would not have an Instagram account,” the coalition of attorneys general wrote, warning that an Instagram for kids would be “harmful for myriad reasons.”

The state attorneys general call for Facebook to abandon its plans, citing concerns around developmental health, privacy and Facebook’s track record of prioritizing growth over the well being of children on its platforms. In the letter, embedded below, they delve into specific worries about cyberbullying, online grooming by sexual predators and algorithms that showed dieting ads to users with eating disorders.

Concerns about social media and mental health in kids and teens is a criticism we’ve been hearing more about this year, as some Republicans join Democrats in coalescing around those issues, moving away from the claims of anti-conservative bias that defined politics in tech during the Trump years.

Leaders from both parties have been openly voicing fears over how social platforms are shaping young minds in recent months amidst calls to regulate Facebook and other social media companies. In April, a group of Congressional Democrats wrote Facebook with similar warnings over its new plans for children, pressing the company for details on how it plans to protect the privacy of young users.

In light of all the bad press and attention from lawmakers, it’s possible that the company may walk back its brazen plans to boost business by bringing more underage users into the fold. Facebook is already in the hot seat with state and federal regulators in just about every way imaginable. Deep worries over the company’s future failures to protect yet another vulnerable set of users could be enough to keep these plans on the company’s back burner.

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Spotify adds timestamped podcast sharing and other social features – TechCrunch

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On the heels of its expanded partnership with Facebook, Spotify this morning announced new sharing features that broaden the way Spotify content, including both music and podcasts, can be shared across social media. As part of this, Spotify’s Canvas feature, which adds a looping, visual art experience to songs, is being improved. Spotify will also now allow users to share a timestamped link to a podcast, which allows users to tune into to a particular moment of the podcast episode.

Previously, if you wanted to share a podcast episode, you could only post the link to the entire episode. But many times, people want to comment on or discuss a particular part of an episode. Now, they’ll be able to do so by using the “switch to share” feature at the current playtime, after tapping the “share” button while listening to the show.

This is toggle switch that lets you share from the timestamp where you’ve paused the show. After turning this one, you’re able to choose where you want to share to — like Instagram, Facebook (Stories or Feed), Snapchat, Twitter, WhatsApp, SMS, and more.

The feature could also potentially be used for podcast marketing purposes. Typically, creators post an interesting clip from their latest episode that includes a link to the episode. But Spotify’s new feature could entice someone to tune in at a particular part, then continue listening. They may even choose to follow the podcast after doing so, as they’ll have already found themselves in the Spotify app. While it may not replace other marketing — not everyone uses Spotify, after all — it could serve as a handy supplement to the creator’s existing promotional activity.

The update to Spotify’s Canvas, meanwhile, is a smaller improvement. Now, users are able to preview their social share across Instagram Stories and now Snapchat, to see how it will appear. Before today, Canvas art could only be shared to Instagram Stories.

Spotify notes that social sharing features had become a more important aspect of using its service during the pandemic, as in-person concerts and fan events had been shut down. Artists and creators still want to engage with their fans, but have had to do so remotely and digitally. And fans want to support their favorites by posting their content to social networks where others can discover them, too.

The new sharing features are a part of Spotify’s larger investment in expanded social media distribution, which recently led to its partnership with Facebook on something the social network called “Project Boombox.” Facebook in April introduced a new miniplayer that streams Spotify’s music and podcasts from the Facebook app. That way, users can listen while they scroll, with Spotify playing in the background. But Spotify’s deal with Facebook doesn’t limit it from making it easier to share to other platforms, as well, as these new features indicate.

Spotify says the new features are rolling out now to global users on both iOS and Android.

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