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Australian Institute of Marine Science trials IoT drifters to monitor oceans

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The Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) has teamed up with Internet of Things (IoT) satellite technology company Myriota to trial ocean drifters that report back to base using satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO).

The low-cost drifters allow AIMS to receive data in “near-real time”, the agency said in a statement.

“Because they connect to LEO satellites, they avoid issues like coverage dropouts and connectivity issues that come from using traditional mobile phone networks,” AIMS technology development team leader Melanie Olsen said.

According to Myriota, the drifters monitor location, currents, sea surface water temperatures, and barometric pressure, and, in future, AIMS could get oceanographic data every hour.

“Data is an essential tool if we are to understand how our oceans behave,” Olsen added. “We need to bring every tool to bear if we are to protect one of our nation’s most precious natural assets, our marine environment.”

In November last year, Myriota CEO Alex Grant detailed the transmitter that was a result of seven years of research and development.

Myriota’s current-generation technology allows for a four-year battery life of IoT devices using two AA batteries; scales to hundreds of millions of connections; and offers a tenfold cost reduction from traditional satellite offerings to “reduce the bar for getting into space”, the chief executive said.

Grant also explained how Myriota has worked to ensure the security of its system.

“We had to really work very hard to solve a problem not just of data payload encryption — that’s fairly straightforward — the real challenge is the authentication and privacy aspects of the link so that you can’t, for example, have an attacker getting home metadata attacks on your IoT system,” Grant said.

“For example, counting how many things you have or being able to tell where all your things are. Even if they don’t know what the actual sensory [data is], there’s a lot of commercial information in perhaps the population of your deployment.”

At the start of the year, Myriota raised $15 million through a Series A funding round, with Boeing HorizonX Ventures, Singtel Innov8, and Right Click Capital.

Myriota said the cash injection would allow to launch more satellites; opening offices in North America and Asia; adding 50 additional staff members to its South Australian headquarters; and launching a $2.7 million IoT innovation lab in Adelaide.

Related Coverage

Myriota brings satellite IoT to regional Australia

Myriota has said it will connect IoT devices with low earth orbit satellites for a lower cost and longer battery life than traditional satellite solutions, with its commercial product launching next year.

Satellite IoT startup Myriota raises $15m

Boeing HorizonX Ventures has kicked in to help raise $15 million to fund Australian startup Myriota, which is aiming to provide IoT connectivity via nano-satellites.

How to improve enterprise IoT security: 5 tips (TechRepublic)

Some 25% of companies struggling with IoT security lost at least $34 million in the last couple years. Here are five ways to stay better protected.

Why the convergence of IoT and AI could change business forever (TechRepublic)

The Internet of Things, expected to grow exponentially over the next half decade, will generate the essential data that AI systems need to automate industry, says Schneider Electric Chief Digital Offi…

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The Best Features Of The Aston Martin Vulcan

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Although the Vulcan was specifically designed not to be road legal, one owner decided that they wanted to stick on some license plates and take it on the highway anyway. Except, it was far from that simple, as the conversion process required making some major changes to the car, and cost several hundred thousand dollars on top of the original purchase price (via Motor1). The street conversion was handled by RML Group but had full support from the Aston Martin factory, and after completion, it became the only road-legal Vulcan in existence.

Among the litany of changes required were the addition of windshield wipers, side mirrors, and a central locking system. Michelin road tires were also fitted, and a new set of headlights had to be installed to meet height requirements for British roads. The bladed tail lights were also covered over for safety, and a few of the sharper surface edges around the cabin were smoothed out. Then, the engine was remapped to meet emissions requirements, the suspension was softened, and a lift system was installed to give the car extra clearance for speed bumps. After all that, plus a few final touches, a license plate was fitted and the car was ready to go. Unfortunately, it seems like the owner’s enthusiasm for taking it on the road quickly evaporated, as checking the car’s plates against the British government database shows that its MOT (the annual national roadworthiness test) certificate expired back in January 2022.

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5 Cars Owned By Bob Seger That Prove He Has Great Taste

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Pulling into the final spot on the list is a 1969 Shelby Cobra GT350 Fastback. This particular car is unique for a few reasons. First, it was the last “new original” Shelby that Ford would produce. The GT350 and GT500 released in 1970 weren’t actually new or original but re-VIN’d production cars from the previous year. Also, during the summer of ’69, Carrol Shelby ended his association with Ford (via MustangSpecs).

It had one of Ford’s new 351 Windsor V8 engines with a 470 CFM four-barrel Autolite carburetor under the hood that pounded out 290hp and 385 lb-ft of torque. Its 0 – 60 time was a modest 6.5 seconds, and it did the quarter mile in 14.9 seconds (via MustangSpecs).

According to MustangSpecs, it was typically mated to a 4-speed manual transmission, but Seger’s had a Tremec 6-speed stick instead (via Mecum Auctions). Seger’s Candy Apple Red GT350 had Ford’s upgraded interior package, flaunting a landscape of imitation teak wood covering the dash, steering wheel, door accents, and center console trim (via MustangSpecs).

According to Mecum Auctions, Seger’s was number 42 of 935. When it sold at auction in 2013 for $65,000, it noted that it had been displayed at the Henry Ford Museum at the Rock Stars, Cars & Guitars Exhibit.

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Here’s What Made Volkswagen’s Air-Cooled Engine So Special

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Engines like the Chevy Small Block, Ford 5.0, Chrysler HEMI, and Toyota 2JZ are known for power, torque, and how quickly they can propel a hunk of steel down the drag strip or around the corners of a track. The Volkswagen air-cooled engine is remembered amongst people who have owned one as reliable, easy to maintain, and as numerous as grains of sand on the beach. VW made literally tens of millions of the engine, including over 21 million in just the Beetle (via Autoweek). 

It’s difficult to nail down specific aspects of the engine’s early history as sources tend to disagree on years. But the engine can be traced back to very early Volkswagen models designed with help from Ferdinand Porsche and built in the late-1930s to early 1940s in Nazi Germany. Official sources from Volkswagen are reluctant to acknowledge use of the engine or even the existence of the Beetle prior to the end of World War II.

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