Connect with us

Tech News

AWS wants to rule the world – TechCrunch

Published

on

AWS, once a nice little side hustle for Amazon’s eCommerce business, has grown over the years into a behemoth that’s on a $27 billion run rate, one that’s still growing at around 45 percent a year. That’s a highly successful business by any measure, but as I listened to AWS executives last week at their AWS re:Invent conference in Las Vegas, I didn’t hear a group that was content to sit still and let the growth speak for itself. Instead, I heard one that wants to dominate every area of enterprise computing.

Whether it was hardware like the new Inferentia chip and Outposts, the new on-prem servers or blockchain and a base station service for satellites, if AWS saw an opportunity they were not ceding an inch to anyone.

Last year, AWS announced an astonishing 1400 new features, and word was that they are on pace to exceed that this year. They get a lot of credit for not resting on their laurels and continuing to innovate like a much smaller company, even as they own gobs of marketshare.

The feature inflation probably can’t go on forever, but for now at least they show no signs of slowing down, as the announcements came at a furious pace once again. While they will tell you that every decision they make is about meeting customer needs, it’s clear that some of these announcements were also about answering competitive pressure.

Going after competitors harder

In the past, AWS kept criticism of competitors to a minimum maybe giving a little jab to Oracle, but this year they seemed to ratchet it up. In their keynotes, AWS CEO Andy Jassy and Amazon CTO Werner Vogels continually flogged Oracle, a competitor in the database market, but hardly a major threat as a cloud company right now.

They went right for Oracle’s market though with a new on prem system called Outposts, which allows AWS customers to operate on prem and in the cloud using a single AWS control panel or one from VMware if customers prefer. That is the kind of cloud vision that Larry Ellison might have put forth, but Jassy didn’t necessarily see it as going after Oracle or anyone else. “I don’t see Outposts as a shot across the bow of anyone. If you look at what we are doing, it’s very much informed by customers,” he told reporters at a press conference last week.

AWS CEO Andy Jassy at a press conference at AWS Re:Invent last week.

Yet AWS didn’t reserve its criticism just for Oracle. It also took aim at Microsoft, taking jabs at Microsoft SQL Server, and also announcing Amazon FSx for Windows File Server, a tool specifically designed to move Microsoft files to the AWS cloud.

Google wasn’t spared either when launching Inferentia and Elastic Inference, which put Google on notice that AWS wasn’t going to yield the AI market to Google’s TPU infrastructure. All of these tools and much more were about more than answering customer demand, they were about putting the competition on notice in every aspect of enterprise computing.

Upward growth trajectory

The cloud market is continuing to grow at a dramatic pace, and as market leader, AWS has been able to take advantage of its market dominance to this point. Jassy, echoing Google’s Diane Greene and Oracle’s Larry Ellison, says the industry as a whole is still really early in terms of cloud adoption, which means there is still plenty of marketshare left to capture.

“I think we’re just in the early stages of enterprise and public sector adoption in the US. Outside the US I would say we are 12-36 months behind. So there are a lot of mainstream enterprises that are just now starting to plan their approach to the cloud,” Jassy said.

Patrick Moorhead, founder and principal analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy says that AWS has been using its market position to keep expanding into different areas. “AWS has the scale right now to do many things others cannot, particularly lesser players like Google Cloud Platform and Oracle Cloud. They are trying to make a point with the thousands of new products and features they bring out. This serves as a disincentive longer-term for other players, and I believe will result in a shakeout,” he told TechCrunch.

As for the frenetic pace of innovation, Moorhead believes it can’t go on forever. “To me, the question is, when do we reach a point where 95% of the needs are met, and the innovation rate isn’t required. Every market, literally every market, reaches a point where this happens, so it’s not a matter of if but when,” he said.

Certainly areas like the AWS Ground Station announcement, showed that AWS was willing to expand beyond the conventional confines of enterprise computing and into outer space to help companies process satellite data. This ability to think beyond traditional uses of cloud computing resources shows a level of creativity that suggests there could be other untapped markets for AWS that we haven’t yet imagined.

As AWS moves into more areas of the enterprise computing stack, whether on premises or in the cloud, they are showing their desire to dominate every aspect of the enterprise computing world. Last week they demonstrated that there is no area that they are willing to surrender to anyone.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Tech News

Here’s Why You Need To Stop Using Internet Explorer Immediately

Published

on

Why should you change web browsers now that Internet Explorer is at its final end? It all comes down to security. Internet Explorer is about to become inarguably insecure software, with a security level that grows ever weaker from this point forward.

Web browsers are regularly updated with new security measures and fixes to potential exploits that could allow an outside party to do all sorts of unpleasant things to your system. Stealing personal information, acquiring credit card or bank account numbers, learning passwords to one or more of your various online services, that kind of thing. Keeping your browser up-to-date reduces the risk of being compromised, and can often remove weaknesses you may not have even known were there.

By continuing to use a web browser after support has been halted, you’re leaving yourself vulnerable to attacks from cagey web links, spam emails, and so on. With no more updates on the horizon, any exploits found from here on out will never be patched up — and you probably won’t even be made aware of them since nobody is maintaining the software anymore. The longer you wait to switch to a new browser, the greater the risk.

Dropped web browser support also means non-security updates are also off the table. No more new features, no eventual improvements to clunky design, and perhaps most importantly: no compatibility updates. At some point, certain basic features just won’t work with an outdated browser anymore. Like it or not, Internet Explorer’s time is up — for real, this time.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Sony LinkBuds S Promise ANC And All-Day Comfort

Published

on

Even though Sony suggests LinkBuds S are the smallest in-ear wireless headphones, they have still managed to cram in reasonably sized 5mm drivers. For comparison, this is only slightly smaller than the 6mm drivers used on the WF-1000XM4.

The product also gets Sony’s Integrated Processor V1 — the same chip we saw on the recently launched Sony WH-1000XM5. This chip claims to improve the overall sound quality of the product by reducing distortion and improving noise cancelation. Sony LinkBuds S earbuds also support “High-Resolution Audio Wireless” with LDAC as well as an autoplay feature that activates the moment users place the buds in their ears.

Sony’s latest earbuds claim a battery life of up to six hours, with the supplied charging case further enhancing the playback time to 14 hours. When completely discharged, the LinkBuds S can be charged for five minutes to get an additional 60 minutes of playback time.

Another interesting feature on the LinkBuds S is support for the Niantic AR game “Ingress.” Sony says LinkBuds S earbuds use sensor and spatial sound technology to combine a great visual and sonic experience. It’s also suggested by Niantic that further integration with their Lightship platform should allow expanded functionality with LinkBuds earbuds soon.

Sony’s LinkBuds S earbuds go on sale starting May 20, 2022, and come in two color options, White and Black, with a suggested retail price of 199.99. They will be available via Sony.com, Amazon, and other authorized dealers. A third color option called “Ecru” is also set to be available as an exclusive release from Best Buy.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Acer’s 2022 Laptop Lineup Is Packed With Chromebooks And Convertibles

Published

on

The next Acer product up for discussion is the Acer Chromebook Tab 510, which — as evident from the name — is a tablet-sized device that also doubles up as a Chromebook thanks to its convertible form factor. This machine features a 10.1-inch IPS LCD panel with a resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels. Apart from featuring an 8MP camera for occasional photos, the Acer Chromebook Tab 510 also boasts of a 5MP selfie camera, which could mostly be used for video calls. 

Speaking of video calls, that brings us to the connectivity aspects of the Tab 510. There is a 4G LTE variant of the Tab 510 that is enabled by the Snapdragon 7c Gen 2 Compute Platform. The Tab also claims 11 hours of battery life from a single charge. Like the Acer Spin 714, this smaller machine also meets MIL-STD 810H standards. This rating is made possible by an impact-resistant chassis, shock-absorbing corner bumpers, and a reinforced design. 

The company claims the Acer Chromebook Tab 510 can survive drops from as high as 48 inches. Another feature borrowed from the Spin 714 is the Antimicrobial Gorilla Glass on the surface of the touchscreen. The Tab 510 also supports a dockable stylus along with a Keyboard Folio case, both of which are optional accessories. The product is expected to go on sale starting in July 2022 with an expected starting price of $399.99

Continue Reading

Trending