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Gold Coast details fibre and Wi-Fi network expansion plans

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The proposed fibre-optic network for the City of Gold Coast

The City of Gold Coast has announced more details of its fibre-optic network expansion, with the main Central Loop of the project set to be completed this financial year.

In Extension of the City-owned optic fibre network: Contractor Briefing tender documents, the City of Gold Coast revealed that the network will consist of three loops: The Central Loop for FY19 completion; the Northern Loop, to be completed the following year; and the Southern Loop, to be completed in FY21.

The Central Loop would include Miami depot, Miami aquatic centre, Burleigh Heads library, Burleigh Surf Life Saving Club, Burleigh Waters library, Robina library, Robina community centre, Mudgeeraba community centre, Mudgeeraba waste transfer station (WTS), Carrara depot, Nerang library, Molendinar WTS, Molendinar water treatment plant, Waterside West, Waterside East, Karp Court, Nerang Admin Building, Nerang Bicentennial, and Varsity Parade.

It would see the fibre-optic network expanded out to Nerang, Helensvale, Broadbeach, Miami, Palm Beach, Currumbin, and Coolangatta, and north past Coomera towards Ormeau and Jacobs Well.

The City of Gold Coast also revealed that it is seeking a panel of telco specialists to work across seven packages: Broadbeach to Miami; Miami to Burleigh Heads; Burleigh Heads Business Centre; Miami to Varsity; Bond University to Robina; Parkwood to Nerang; and Nerang to Robina.

The Gold Coast will also gain new Wi-Fi zones across Burleigh, Miami, and Nobbys foreshores; Waterside precinct; Cultural precinct; Nerang Admin precinct; Robina community centre; all libraries; and its Health and Knowledge Precinct.

This is in addition to its existing Wi-Fi zones in Broadwater Parklands, Surfers Paradise, Broadbeach, and Coolangatta.

According to the tender documents, the delivery method should combine use of existing conduit networks in parks and roadways; new construction; use of council facilities such as optical transport network outdoor units, lighting and CTTV poles, and toilet blocks; a design change from cabinet distribution to underground access joint; and outdoor cabinets, Wi-Fi APs, and layer 2 network devices.

Project delivery on the Central Loop is set to begin on October 15, 2018, and be complete by June 17, 2019.

The City of Gold Coast had in August announced that it would be spending AU$10 million to add a 37-kilometre loop to its fibre-optic broadband network as part of its Digital City Program.

The expansion of the city-owned broadband network should provide AU$2.5 million through cost savings in addition to the revenue being made by wholesaling the network to retail service providers, according to the city.

Gold Coast chief innovation and economy officer Ian Hatton said the fibre network — currently a 65km network running between Helensvale and Broadbeach that cost AU$4.5 million to deploy — will “support accelerated deployment of 5G”.

“We’re developing a low-latency, high-core-count fibre optic network that has the capacity to deliver the fastest internet speeds in Australia. When finished, the network will be 100 times faster than what exists today,” Hatton said at the time.

The Queensland government had in April revealed that it was undertaking due diligence to assess whether it can provide capacity on its own fibre-optic network ahead of the limited fibre provision of the federal government’s National Broadband Network (NBN).

In late August, the City of Gold Coast then announced that it will also be building out an Internet of Things (IoT) network covering more than 1,300 square kilometres, with plans to use the connectivity for digital water metering, waste management, and support for parks and fields.

The LoRaWAN network is likewise part of the city’s digitisation program, and is being built and operated by Australia’s National Narrowband Network Company (NNNCo).

“We’re developing a secure, scalable, commercial-grade IoT network that will enable infinite use cases by businesses, enterprise, and the council,” Hatton said.

“We chose LoRaWAN technology because it supports large-scale deployments securely, reliably, and cost effectively. NNNCo have been engaged because of their proven ability to build the network and bring commercial solutions that have the potential to significantly add value to Gold Coast residents and businesses.”

The network being provided by NNNCo — which has also been chosen to build IoT networks for Newcastle and Lake Macquarie — will lower costs across water management, Hatton added, as well as enabling early detection of any issues.

As a result of hosting the Commonwealth Games earlier this year, the Gold Coast was also the first area in the nation to have a live 5G network courtesy of Telstra, as well as a trial 5G network from Optus that ran during the event.

According to the Queensland government’s submission to the to the Joint Standing Committee on the National Broadband Network’s rural and regional rollout inquiry, it is additionally encouraging the uptake of “competitive” non-NBN fixed-wireless services in areas that are not yet ready to connect to the NBN.

Related Coverage

Gold Coast announces AU$10 million fibre broadband expansion

The City of Gold Coast is adding more areas to its fibre broadband network under an additional loop at a cost of AU$10 million.

Gold Coast announces IoT network

In addition to its fibre-optic broadband expansion and its 5G access via Telstra and Optus, the City of Gold Coast has announced that it is building an IoT network with NNNCo.

Optus launches ‘5G Live’ experience in the Gold Coast

Optus’ live indoor and outdoor trial 5G network in the Gold Coast is providing download speeds of up to 16Gbps, as well as demonstrating a range of 5G use cases including robotics and VR.

Telstra’s 5G network goes live in the Gold Coast

Telstra plans to switch on more than 200 ‘5G-capable sites’ by the end of 2018, starting in the Gold Coast.

Western Tasmania gains fibre broadband under NBN tech choice program

The government has finally made good on an election promise to provide fixed-line and fixed-wireless NBN connections instead of satellite to the West Coast of Tasmania.

5G mobile networks: A cheat sheet (TechRepublic)

As LTE networks become increasingly saturated, mobile network operators are planning for the 5G future. Here is what business professionals and mobile users need to know about 5G.

Streaming media policy (Tech Pro Research)

Although there are many legitimate business reasons to access streamed audio and video files, such as engaging in training, reviewing industry-related content, and conducting research.

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Galaxy Z Fold 4 Under-Display Camera May Get A Stealthy Makeover

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According to a tweet from the account @SamsungRydah, which was first spied by SamMobile and has since been removed by Twitter based on a copyright claim (seemingly lending credibility to the leak), the Galaxy Z Fold 4 will rectify the poor invisibility of the UDC. The model will reportedly use a different arrangement of pixels to make it denser, providing a 132ppi circle, up from the Galaxy Z Fold 3 model’s measly 94ppi. The result is that the hole will hopefully be less visible, and text should be less distorted in that area. Unfortunately, it’s not completely invisible, at least not based on the leaked slide.

What isn’t clear, however, is whether Samsung is also upgrading the camera sensor itself to something more than just 4MP. Increasing the sensor’s own pixel count could help offset whatever side effects the UDC panel might have in terms of quality. While the Galaxy Z Fold 3 foldable’s internal camera was moderately usable for video calls, it just didn’t sit well with buyers considering how much they’d paid for the premium phone.

An upgraded internal camera would be in line with upgrades to the other cameras expected for the Galaxy Z Fold 4. These include a 50MP main sensor and a 10MP telephoto with 3x optical zoom. These are moderate upgrades, of course, but Samsung seems to be taking a page from Apple’s book here by improving quality through software and other minor tweaks rather than going all out on what would be a bulky sensor that wouldn’t fit the Galaxy Z Fold 4 model’s slim profile.

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Today’s Wordle Answer #416 – August 9, 2022 Solution And Hints

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The answer to today’s Wordle puzzle (#416 – August 9, 2022) is patty. Its meaning varies across cultural contexts — to the British, it’s a small pie or pastry; to North Americans, it’s a small, round, and flat chocolate-covered peppermint sweet. More generally to Americans, it’s a small flat cake of minced or finely chopped food, especially meat (via Merriam-Webster). To Mr. Krabs of SpongeBob, it’s a veggie burger (and a moneymaker). Seeing as the word patty has roots in the French word “pat,e” which means dough, Mr. Krabs obviously knew what he was doing. 

We solved the puzzle in four tries today, just like yesterday and the day before. We began guessing with the word roate, which is an uncommon but excellent first guess (even the WordleBot thought so). After following up with fluid, we hit a lucky strike with catty — only one letter short of the correct answer.

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The Reason Ford Won’t Build A Mustang GT500 Convertible

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Ford won’t be making a convertible Mustang GT500 because… it’s too powerful.

Hau Thai-Tang, Ford’s chief product platform, and operations officer confirmed the S550 platform on which the Mustang was built had reached “the top end of the capabilities” (via Muscle Cars & Trucks).

Dave Pericack, former Director Enterprise Product Line Management — Ford Icons, backs up those comments even more bluntly. “The real reason” Ford isn’t making a convertible model is because, by removing the roof, the car would lose all its structure and stiffness in the chassis and body. The power of the GT500 is simply too much for a convertible car to handle.

The only way it could make a convertible model would be to “spend a lot of money in exotic material” to compensate for the loss of the roof and the structural integrity it provides (via Ford Authority). Ford is not prepared to do that, considering the S550 platform is nearing the end of its road. The S650 platform — the seventh generation of Ford Mustangs — is on its way and will, in all likelihood, be the last Mustang with an internal combustion engine.

Fear not Ford faithful. The Blue Oval is already looking to the future and has already built a 900hp electric Mustang to show the world that an EV can also be a muscle car.

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