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Google’s new version of Android Auto focuses on Assistant

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Google is starting to roll out an updated version of its in-car platform, Android Auto, that aims to make it easier and safer for drivers to use.

The version, which was first revealed during Google I/O 2019, has a dark theme, new fonts and color accents, more opportunities to communicate with Google’s virtual assistant and the ability to fit wider display screens that are becoming more common in vehicles.

Android Auto, which launched in 2015, is not an operating system. It’s a secondary interface — or HMI layer — that sits on top of an operating system and brings the look and feel of a smartphone to the vehicle’s central screen. Rival Apple introduced its own in-car platform, Apple CarPlay, that same year.

Automakers, once hesitant to integrate Android Auto or Apple CarPlay into vehicles, have come around. Today, Android Auto is available in more than 500 car models from 50 different brands, according to Android Auto product manager Rod Lopez.

Car owners with Android Auto support will start to see the new design over the next few weeks. However, updates will not be made to the standalone version of Android Auto, a smartphone app that gave users access to the platform even if their car wasn’t compatible with Android Auto. Google says it plans to “evolve” the standalone phone app from Android Auto to the Assistant’s new driving mode in the future.

Meanwhile, the in-car version features some important changes, notably more opportunities for drivers to use their voice — and not their hands — to interact with Android Auto. Users will notice the Google Assistant badge on Android Auto, that when tapped will provide information about their calendar, or read the weather report or news.

Other new features include a new app launcher designed to let users access their favorite apps with fewer taps. A button on the bottom-left of the screen launches this feature. Once deployed, users will see app icons, with the most commonly used ones featured in the top row.

Android Auto has also improved its navigation, which is perhaps the most commonly used feature within the platform. Now, the navigation bar sits at the bottom of the display and allows users to manage multiple apps. This improvement means users won’t miss an exit or street while they’re listening to Spotify .

4Android Auto Media

The navigation feature also pops up as soon as the driver connects with Android Auto. If a route is already queued up on a phone, Android Auto will automatically populate the directions.

This latest version also has a new notification button — located on the bottom-right corner — that houses recent calls, messages and alerts. Drivers can tap the mic button or say “Hey Google” to have the Google Assistant help make calls, send messages and read notifications.

Google has also developed an operating system called Android Automotive OS that’s modeled after its open-source mobile operating system that runs on Linux. Instead of running smartphones and tablets, Google modified it so it could be used in cars. Polestar, Volvo’s standalone performance electric car brand, is going to produce a new vehicle, the Polestar 2, that has an infotainment system powered by Android Automotive OS.

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Cox’s bad customer service stymies users who don’t want upload speeds cut

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Cox has been making it extremely difficult or impossible for some customers to stick with their current Internet speeds despite promising that it won’t force users onto plans with slower uploads.

As we wrote two weeks ago, Cox informed customers with 300Mbps download and 30Mbps upload speeds that they will be switched to a plan with 500Mbps downloads and 10Mbps uploads on March 3. A Cox spokesperson told Ars at the time that customers can stay on the plan with 30Mbps uploads as long as they upgrade to a DOCSIS 3.1 modem. But Cox’s email to its customers did not mention this option, and customers who called Cox customer service have since been told in no uncertain terms that they cannot stay on their current plans.

Several Cox users from California emailed Ars about the problem after reading our article, all with similar experiences.

“I just got off the phone with a Cox tech rep and she said that my current Ultimate Classic plan (300/30) is going away regardless of whether I upgrade to a DOCSIS 3.1 modem or not,” a customer whose first name is Dam and lives in Aliso Viejo, California, told Ars on Thursday last week. “When the time comes in March, my new plan will be the new Ultimate 500/10. I told her about your article and she said that is not what she’s seeing in her system or hearing from her higher-ups.”

We contacted Cox about the problem on Friday last week, and a Cox spokesperson admitted that the company failed to ensure that sales reps know customers are allowed to stay on the 300/30Mbps plan.

“There clearly are some gaps that we need to address to avoid this confusion,” Cox told Ars on Monday. “We’re in the process of retraining our frontline-facing teams to make sure they are consistently communicating the options available to impacted customers, including staying on their existing plan of 300/30 so long as they upgrade their modem.”

As before, customers will be automatically switched from the 300/30Mbps plan to the 500/10Mbps tier unless they contact customer service and insist on keeping their plan. The change to download and upload speeds will happen regardless of whether customers have an upgraded modem, but customers who stick with an older modem may not get the full 500Mbps download speeds. Cox, which has about 5.3 million Internet customers in 19 states, says the changes are related to a network upgrade.

Cox’s customer-service screwup

The evidence (including Cox’s email to customers and statements from Cox sales reps to customers) makes it seem as if Cox didn’t intend to let customers keep their 30Mbps upload speeds until the company faced criticism and media exposure two weeks ago. That would explain why customer-service reps have told customers they must give up the 300/30Mbps plan and why Cox is now scrambling to tell employees about the option.

However, a Cox spokesperson told Ars that the company “always” intended to let customers keep the 30Mbps upload speeds. If that is true, then the company totally screwed up its messaging to customers and the change to its customer-service systems.

Cox described the fix now being implemented as a “retraining” in a statement to Ars yesterday:

Our frontline care agents were originally trained late January ahead of the first batch of customer communications in early February. Based on the feedback from a few customers, including the ones you shared, we are revisiting training to ensure ALL customers are getting consistent and correct information. To that end, we are in the process of conducting refresher training that will run through the end of this week for all our frontline employees.

As we retrain our employees, we are making sure they are communicating the options available to impacted customers, including staying on their existing Ultimate Classic plan (300/30) so long as they upgrade their modem. Staying on this plan was always an available option, albeit not one that was communicated as clearly as it could have been. We want to be sure customers clearly understand their options if they need more upload speed.

The 500/10Mbps plan is a direct replacement for the 300/30Mbps plan in terms of price and its place within Cox’s speed tiers. It costs $80 a month for the first year and $100 after the promo period expires. With the 300/30Mbps plan being discontinued, the only option with upload speeds higher than 10Mbps is the “Gigablast” plan with 940Mbps download speeds and 35Mbps upload speeds. That plan generally costs $100 during the promo period and $120 afterward, but some customers have been offered a $92.50 promotional rate. Cox charges $12 a month for a combined modem and router, but customers can use their own compatible equipment to avoid the rental fee.

Cox’s email notifying users of the upcoming download and upload speed changes said that customers who want upload speeds above 10Mbps can “call to learn more about equipment and our speed plans,” but it did not mention the option of staying on the same 300/30Mbps plan. Customers who received this email and those who contact Cox before all of the customer-service problems are solved may still mistakenly believe that keeping their plan isn’t an option. They would thus have their upload speeds cut to 10Mbps automatically when the change takes effect next week. We asked Cox if it is contacting all of these customers again to make clear they can avoid the upload-speed cut, and we will update this article if we get an answer.

Cox has apparently struggled to provide advertised upload speeds during the pandemic. In June 2020, we wrote about how Cox warned some customers about “excessive” upload usage and how the company lowered upload speeds on the Gigablast plan from 35Mbps to 10Mbps in some entire neighborhoods where its network was having trouble.

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Ukraine says Russia hacked its document portal and planted malicious files

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Ukraine has accused the Russian government of hacking into one of its government Web portals and planting malicious documents that would install malware on end users’ computers.

“The purpose of the attack was the mass contamination of information resources of public authorities, as this system is used for the circulation of documents in most public authorities,” officials from Ukraine’s National Coordination Center for Cybersecurity said in a statement published on Wednesday. “The malicious documents contained a macro that secretly downloaded a program to remotely control a computer when opening the files.”

Wednesday’s statement said that the methods used in the attack connected the hackers to the Russian Federation. Ukraine didn’t say if the attack succeeded in infecting any authorities’ computers.
A large body of evidence has linked Russia’s government to several highly aggressive hacks against Ukraine in the past. The hacks include:

  • A computer intrusion in late 2015 against regional power authorities in Ukraine. It caused a power failure that left hundreds of thousands of homes without electricity in the dead of winter.
  • Almost exactly one year later, a second attack at an electricity substation outside Kyiv that once again left residents without power
  • A malicious update for widely used tax software in Ukraine that distributed disk-wiping malware to users. The so-called NotPetya worm ended up shutting down computers worldwide and led to the world’s most costly hack.

Elsewhere, Russia’s SVR intelligence agency has also been accused of carrying out the recently discovered hack that targeted at least nine US agencies and 100 companies in a supply chain attack against customers of the SolarWinds network management software.

Wednesday’s statement didn’t identify which of several known Russian hacking groups was accused of the breach.

Macro attacks like the one mentioned in the statement typically work by tricking Microsoft Office users into enabling macros, often under the guise that the macro is required for the document to display properly. The macros then download malware from an attacker-controlled server and install it.

The statement provided no details on how or when Ukraine’s System of Electronic Interaction of Executive Bodies—a portal that distributes documents to public authorities—was hacked or how long the intrusion lasted.

Indicators that someone has been compromised include:

Domain: enterox.ru

IP addresses: 109.68.212.97

Link (URL): http://109.68.212.97/infant.php

Wednesday’s statement came two days after Ukraine’s National Coordination Center for Cybersecurity reported what it said were “massive DDoS attacks on the Ukrainian segment of the Internet, mainly on the websites of the security and defense sector.” An analysis revealed that the attacks used a new mechanism that hadn’t been seen before. DDoS attacks take down targeted servers by bombarding them with more data than they can process.

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Android users now have an easy way to check the security of their passwords

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Google is adding its password checkup feature to Android, making the mobile OS the latest company offering to give users an easy way to check if the passcodes they’re using have been compromised.

Password Checkup works by checking credentials entered into apps against a list of billions of credentials compromised in the innumerable website breaches that have occurred in recent years. In the event there’s a match, users receive an alert, along with a prompt that can take them to Google’s password manager page, which offers a way to review the security of all saved credentials.

Alerts look like this:

Google

Google introduced Password Checkup in early 2019, in the form of a Chrome extension. In October of that year, the feature made its way into the Google Password Manager, a dashboard that examines Web passwords saved within Chrome that are synchronized using a Google account. Two months later, the company added it to Chrome.

Google’s Password Manager makes it easy for users to directly visit sites using bad passwords by clicking the “Change Password” button displayed next to each compromised or weak password. The password manager is accessible from any browser, but it works only when users sync credentials using their Google account password, rather than an optional standalone password.

The new password checkup was available as of Tuesday on Android 9 and above for users of autofill with Android, a feature that automatically adds passwords, addresses, payment details, and other information commonly entered into Web and app forms.

The Android autofill framework uses advanced encryption to ensure that passwords and other information are available only to authorized users. Google has access to user credentials only when users 1) have already saved a credential to their Google account and 2) were offered to save a new credential by the Android OS and chose to save it to their account.

When a user interacts with a password by either filling it into a form or saving it for the first time, Google uses the same encryption that powers the Privacy Checkup in Chrome to check if the credential is part of a list of known compromised passwords. The Web application interface sends only passwords that are cryptographically hashed using the Argon2 function to create a search key that’s encrypted with Elliptic Curve cryptography.

In a post published Tuesday, Google said that the implementation ensures that:

  • Only an encrypted hash of the credential leaves the device (the first two bytes of the hash are sent unencrypted to partition the database)
  • The server returns a list of encrypted hashes of known breached credentials that share the same prefix
  • The actual determination of whether the credential has been breached happens locally on the user’s device
  • The server (Google) does not have access to the unencrypted hash of the user’s password and the client (User) does not have access to the list of unencrypted hashes of potentially breached credentials

Google has written more about how the implementation works here.

On most Android devices, autofill can be enabled by:

  1. Opening Settings
  2. Tapping System > Languages & input > Advanced
  3. Tapping Autofill service
  4. Tapping Google to make sure the setting is enabled

Separately, Google on Tuesday reminded users of two other security features added to Android autofill last September. The first is a password generator that will automatically choose a strong and unique password and save it to users’ Google accounts. The generator can be accessed by long-pressing the password field and selecting Autofill in the pop-up menu.

Users can also configure the Android autofill to require biometric authentication before it will add credentials or payment information to an app or Web field. Biometric authentication can be enabled inside of the Autofill with Google settings.

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