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Hacker behind ‘Football Leaks’ arrested in Hungary

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Portuguese police announced yesterday the arrest of a Portuguese man in Hungary who they believe hacked, stole, and then leaked secret documents from European football (soccer) clubs during the past four years.

Authorities didn’t disclose the man’s name, but local newspaper Record identified the suspect as Rui Pinto, a man who several newspapers from Spain, Portugal, and Germany previously named as the shadowy figure behind the infamous Football Leaks portal.

Since 2015, the Football Leaks website operated a-la WikiLeaks, publishing secret documents that it claimed it obtained from anonymous sources. The site, a mere WordPress.com blog, made the documents available for everyone, but also to teams of investigative journalists across Europe.

The documents helped reveal the football world’s shady inter-club player transfers that included shell companies and a slew of intermediaries that siphoned off huge bonuses from each player transaction.

The site also revealed how top European football clubs like Machester City and Paris Saint Germain often broke regulations, dumped private emails from David Beckham, and revealed how Jose Mourinho avoided paying taxes on millions.

The website temporarily ceased its activity in 2016 after several football clubs made allegations that the site’s owner tried to extort money from them for not publishing certain files.

Some clubs blamed the 2015-2016 leaks on FIFA, the international football federation. They claimed that FIFA was the only entity from where a hacker could have gotten these documents at once. However, Portuguese club Benfica said at the time that some of the leaked documents were only available on its systems, and asked Portuguese police to investigate.

However, the Football Leaks portal didn’t stay silent for long, and came back to life this past fall when FIFA admitted to a new hack and warned the football world of impending leaks.

The leaks didn’t fail to arrive, first with the details about rape allegations made by a US model against football superstar Cristiano Ronaldo, and then with the revelation that several major European football clubs where planning their own private league.

Pinto, who is only 30 years old, now awaits in Budapest to be extradited to Portugal, where he could face up to ten years in prison.

The European Investigative Collaborations (EIC), the pan-European investigative journalism organization who received all the Football Leaks files, said it received 18.6 million documents in 2016, a number which it now updated to over 70 million.

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GigaOm Radar for Unified Endpoint Management (UEM)

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Endpoint management is one of the most significant challenges enterprises face today. The modern workforce is becoming more distributed and demanding the flexibility to work where they want, when they want. Business leaders must respond to this demand and provide access to the services employees require, while also maintaining security and control of the business’s data assets.

To address these issues, organizations need an appropriate endpoint management strategy. The modern approach should be holistic and unified, bringing together control of devices, management of applications, security of data, and user access controls. Failing to deliver an effective endpoint strategy can have significant business impact, negatively affecting efficiency and competitiveness. Now, more than ever, the inability to offer a positive and flexible end user experience can make a business less attractive to potential employees.

The management of endpoint devices is not a new challenge; however, the way we operate has changed. This is reflected clearly in how market-leading vendors have shifted their approach, moving from “point solutions” to developing unified endpoint management (UEM) solutions. UEM solutions provide a single platform to manage a wide variety of endpoints, from desktops and laptops to cloud repositories. They offer granular control policies from configuration and applications to security based on geography, and from complete device restrictions to nuanced data controls.

This GigaOM radar report evaluates the leading UEM vendors that can underpin your endpoint management strategy. We look at tools that effectively meet the demands of the modern enterprise by providing robust management, security, and control. This report aims to give enterprise decision makers an overview of how these offerings can help address the complex challenge of endpoint management.

How to Read this Report

This GigaOm report is one of a series of documents that helps IT organizations assess competing solutions in the context of well-defined features and criteria. For a fuller understanding consider reviewing the following reports:

Key Criteria report: A detailed market sector analysis that assesses the impact that key product features and criteria have on top-line solution characteristics—such as scalability, performance, and TCO—that drive purchase decisions.

GigaOm Radar report: A forward-looking analysis that plots the relative value and progression of vendor solutions along multiple axes based on strategy and execution. The Radar report includes a breakdown of each vendor’s offering in the sector.

Solution Profile: An in-depth vendor analysis that builds on the framework developed in the Key Criteria and Radar reports to assess a company’s engagement within a technology sector. This analysis includes forward-looking guidance around both strategy and product.

The post GigaOm Radar for Unified Endpoint Management (UEM) appeared first on Gigaom.

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Key Criteria for Evaluating Deception Technology

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Attacker techniques and behaviors are constantly improving and evolving. As cyber security defenses zig, attackers zag. This dynamic creates a changed environment—what worked in the past to detect malicious actions most likely won’t work today or in the future. Deception technology (DT) tackles this quandary head on and provides defenders the ability to set traps for attackers and to gather valuable information for making better decisions.

Historically, DT would be executed in the form of either a honeypot or a sandbox. A honeypot is a trap set by defenders to emulate a real device in the network, while a sandbox is a virtual environment meant to deceive malware and allow analysis of the malware post-exploitation without endangering the organization.

Today, DT is described in much broader terms. Legacy DT solutions that attempt to emulate typical on-premises infrastructure like Linux and Windows hosts are ill fitting for modern organizations that have no perimeter or physical data centers. Components like cloud, SDN, remote workers, and the need for forensic analysis of attacker techniques have driven the evolution of DT to include features like mapping to the MITRE ATT&CK or SHIELD frameworks, low-code/no-code customization, and leveraging bait or lures for agentless deception.

How to Read this Report

This GigaOm report is one of a series of documents that helps IT organizations assess competing solutions in the context of well-defined features and criteria. For a fuller understanding consider reviewing the following reports:

Key Criteria report: A detailed market sector analysis that assesses the impact that key product features and criteria have on top-line solution characteristics—such as scalability, performance, and TCO—that drive purchase decisions.

GigaOm Radar report: A forward-looking analysis that plots the relative value and progression of vendor solutions along multiple axes based on strategy and execution. The Radar report includes a breakdown of each vendor’s offering in the sector.

Solution Profile: An in-depth vendor analysis that builds on the framework developed in the Key Criteria and Radar reports to assess a company’s engagement within a technology sector. This analysis includes forward-looking guidance around both strategy and product.

The post Key Criteria for Evaluating Deception Technology appeared first on Gigaom.

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Key Criteria for Evaluating Developer Security Tools

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Software needs to be written, built, and deployed with security in mind. This is true for both the application being created and the activities involved in its creation. In an ideal world, developers would be security engineers also and would build appropriate risk-mitigation features into their software applications, as well as follow appropriate procedures and apply policies to mitigate potential risk. The reality for many organizations, however, is that the urgency for software updates or new software often outweighs the ability to apply appropriate security at every step throughout the development and operation of a software product’s lifecycle.

Expanding the DevOps movement by considering security alongside every development or operational step in an application’s lifecycle, DevSecOps has become as popular a term as DevOps itself. Unfortunately, just as with DevOps, DevSecOps is not a single product or SKU that an organization can procure. There is no “one-size-fits-all” approach. The term itself may be defined differently to take into account the specific needs of an organization or department and touches all people, processes, and tooling across a software development workflow.

One key approach, often the one most associated with the term “DevSecOps,” is the focus on development security tools with a “shift-left” mindset; that is, tools that consider security as early as possible in the software development lifecycle. This mindset involves rapid security education, insights, and direct feedback to developers and engineers early in the development process. We describe this in more detail later.

This Key Criteria report examines the capabilities and trends that decision makers should look for when adopting that shift-left mindset to increase application security and release velocity, while reducing cost and risk.

The report also considers how to evaluate vendors’ capabilities to provide security-related insights, automation, and compliance closer to the developer—earlier in the development workflow—addressing ways to reduce risk while writing code, storing code, and deploying it across process and pipeline. Among our findings:

  • Development security tooling reduces risk and increases developer velocity by applying and enforcing “shift-left” security practices.
  • Developer security tooling automation can close the gap between security engineers and developers without sacrificing development speed.
  • Developer security tooling integrates with existing development and operational tools to increase the visibility of security-related events across development, operations, and security teams.
  • Developer security tooling delivers value by building on software and architecture (cloud and on-prem) vulnerability scanning, application and infrastructure hardening, and other well-established areas of IT security.

Developer security tools and a “shift-left” mindset are key building blocks for helping enterprises reduce the security risks associated with building and deploying applications. In addition to establishing security as a first-class citizen across the development workflow, this approach offers more traditional enterprises with long-established software development practices a connection point to leading-edge best practices, enabling them to develop and deliver software both quickly and in compliance with organizational policies.

How to Read this Report

This GigaOm report is one of a series of documents that helps IT organizations assess competing solutions in the context of well-defined features and criteria. For a fuller understanding consider reviewing the following reports:

Key Criteria report: A detailed market sector analysis that assesses the impact that key product features and criteria have on top-line solution characteristics—such as scalability, performance, and TCO—that drive purchase decisions.

GigaOm Radar report: A forward-looking analysis that plots the relative value and progression of vendor solutions along multiple axes based on strategy and execution. The Radar report includes a breakdown of each vendor’s offering in the sector.

Solution Profile: An in-depth vendor analysis that builds on the framework developed in the Key Criteria and Radar reports to assess a company’s engagement within a technology sector. This analysis includes forward-looking guidance around both strategy and product.

The post Key Criteria for Evaluating Developer Security Tools appeared first on Gigaom.

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