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Here are the 88 companies that launched at YC’s W19 Demo Day 2 – TechCrunch

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Today was the second half of Y Combinator’s two-day Demo Day for its Winter 2019 class. Over 85 startups pitched on stage yesterday, and another huge batch launched today.

Previously held at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, this YC Demo Day instead took over a massive warehouse in San Francisco. Like yesterday’s pitches, today’s were split across two stages (“Pioneer” and “Mission”) running in parallel — so even if you were there, you couldn’t see everything alone.

Here are all of the companies that launched today, and our notes from their presentations.

YSplit: Splitting utility bills and other recurring payments with roommates or loved ones is a huge pain where one person has to front the money and then nag the others to get paid back. YSplit offers virtual debit cards that make it easy to automatically split bills and collect cash from users’ bank accounts. By charging a 2 percent interchange fee to merchants, YSplit could build a solid business from the 26 million shared homes in the US alone.

The Juggernaut: A subscription publication focusing on South Asian stories. They hire freelance writers, publish one story per day, and charge users $5 a month. We wrote about The Juggernaut here.

 

Searchlight: Reference checks can screen out bad hires, yet many businesses wait until the very end of the interview cycle or don’t do extensive checks. Searchlight offers reference checks as a service. Job candidates invite their references to submit testimonials, which Searchlight collects and organizes into reports about someone’s work style, ideal environment, and skillset. Searchlight earns an average of $250 per job hopes to investigate all 30 million skilled hires in the US per year.

Allo: Connects local parents and helps them help each other with things like babysitting and errand-running through a “Karma” point system. Average user returns 12x per week.

 

Coursedog: Universities employ full time scheduling administrators to place faculty into courses and rooms. Coursedog automates this process by plugging into a school’s data to eliminate this busy work. Coursedog already has 8 university clients paying over $100,000 for a three-year contract. Next it wants to move into modernizing the process of booking spaces on campus as well as instructor and tuition payments.

 

AI Insurance: Cloud-based software for insurance claims. By moving things to the cloud rather than filing cabinets, the founders say they can save “thousands of hours per claim”. Their goal, once they’ve got enough claim data, is to use AI to determine things like how much a claim might ultimately cost.

 

Nebullam: Growing crops indoors can produce more food per acre that’s not dependent on weather, but the problems are the high labor costs and payback times for expensive equipment. Nebullam wants to be the John Deere of indoor farming. It sells a vertical farming cube and other equipment that can maximize yield and minimize costs. With a CEO who grew up on a farm, it’s already managed a 3 year payback time for its equipment vs an industry standard for 7 years.

Pronto: Ride-sharing for smaller cities in Latin America. Co-founder Miguel Martinez Cano says that the Uber model doesn’t work in these cities, as would-be riders don’t have credit cards and instead want to pay cash. Drivers pay a subscription fee of $59-99 per month. Currently doing 62,000 trips per month.

 

LEAH Labs: People spend $500 million per year on chemotherapy for their dogs, even though the treatment only extends their life temporarily without curing their disease. LEAH Labs wants to cure B-cell lymphoma cancer in dogs using Car T cells, a powerful new treatment method. There have been $20 billion in recent Car T cell company exits, but none of the big players are focused on dogs. LEAH Labs falls under the USDA instead of the FDA, so it requires less investment to get approved, which translate into $5,000 treatments.

 

Balto: A platform for fantasy sports league managers to make money from their work. As fantasy sports betting moves toward legality in more states, they want to capture the audience already making bets through other means.

 

Visly: Developers waste a ton of time rebuilding the same product for iOS, Android, and web and Visly says only 15 percent of developers use tools to simplify this. Visly’s cross-platform UI development suite makes it quick and easy to create consistent apps for different devices. The CEO worked on Facebook’s version called Yoga, but it always failed. Visly has fixed those problems so developers can focus on their invention, not porting it to other operating systems.

 

Mudrex: Lets people do algorithmic trading without programming knowledge, beginning with cryptocurrency. Last week, they saw a trading volume of $150,000. They charge users $300 a year for access to a drag and drop interface for building trading models, which the user can then test against historical trading data.

Brain Key: Diagnosis for brain diseases using 3D MRI data. Whereas many doctors use 2D slices from MRIs for diagnosis, Brain Key says they’re able to analyze data in 3D to do things like identify Parkinsons subtypes 35% more accurately than experts. They’re aiming to be in hospitals worldwide within 2 years.

 

Switchboard: It’s tough to efficiently match available trucks with freight needing to be shipped if you don’t know where the trucks are. Switchboard’s on-board truck sensors collect real time data on a truck’s location, destination, and more. Switchboard’s trucking freight marketplace launched three months ago and is already gathering data that could unlock more revenue streams.

Shef: Two months ago, California passed the first law in the country legalizing the sale of home cooked food. Shef creates a marketplace where home chefs can find nearby customers. Shef’s meals cost around $6.50 compared to $20 per meal for traditional food delivery, and the startup takes a 22 percent cut of every transaction. It’s been growing 50 percent month over month thanks to deals with large property management companies that offer the marketplace as a perk to their residents. Shef wants to be the Airbnb of home cooked food.

Qwest: Lets people pay money to skip lines at venues like clubs and bars. They’re currently at 10 venues in 2 cities, and say they should be at 100 venues in 6 cities this year. They aim to expand to events like music festivals and sporting events.

 

Circumvent Pharmaceuticals: Brain disease Batten, the Alzheimer’s of children, has no adequate treatment. Circumvent says its treatment can replace the missing enzyme at the root of the disease and has already been shown to be effective in mice. If it can get through expedited approval thanks to incentives for treating rare diseases, Circumvent wants to sell its medicine for $100,000 which is covered by insurance. Once it clears that hurdle, Circumvent will be much closer to working on Alzheimer’s treatments which could be hugely lucrative and a big win for humanity.

Withfriends: Membership programs for small businesses like bars, theaters, and barbershops. So far they have 80 small businesses on the platform, with over 5000 members working out to $400,000 in revenue. By integrating right into PoS machines, they say 15% of customers convert into members.

 

Askdata: Non-technical employees rarely use company data because it’s difficult to find and understand. Askdata offers a natural language search engine for internal data that translates words into SQL queries. Making data conveniently accessible could help businesses make better decisions.

 

Modern Labor: Pays people $10,000 to learn to code in exchange for 15% of their income for 2 years thereafter. Founder Francis Larson says Modern Labor’s first group of students is going through the program now, with 10,000 students on a waiting list.

NALA: Making mobile payments in Africa can require an internet connection and typing in a complex 46-digit code like the one above. NALA makes a mobile money app for easily paying friends and merchants as well as buying Internet airtime to capture the $300 billion in yearly mobile payments in Africa. Co-founder Benjamin Fernandes says NALA is 7X faster than competitors and has 5,000 active users. NALA earns money off commissions on airtime and bill payments, interest on savings, sending leads to insurance companies and other services. 

 

Vice Lotteries: A lottery platform that’s trying to “take the loss” out of lotteries. Amongst other things, they limit the bets users are allowed to make based on their wealth to prevent betting too much. Founder Matthew Curtis notes that their model is currently not legal, but they’re actively trying to change that.

 

GoLinks: Long, complex URLs make it tough to access internal company tools. GoLinks makes links short and easy to remember for clients like Reddit and Lyft. Its tool can programmatically generate URLs that are single sign-on compliant, and teams get a dashboard of analytics. Whether employees are setting up a new computer or working while traveling, GoLinks means they won’t be locked out.

Allure Systems:  Fashion brands spend $8 billion per year on models and photographers. Allure Systems uses AI to programatically produce apparel images for shopping sites. The technology can take one photo of a jacket and show it in a variety of poses on a range of models across different sizes. By increasing shopping conversion rates by 14 percent, the team has already racked up $1.4 million in annual recurring revenue with an average SAAS contract costing over $200,000 per year.

Spiral Genetics: Software built to compare large sets of human genome data to help cure diseases. Founder Adina Mangubat says existing software can’t analyze genome data at the massive scale it’ll be at in the coming years. They’ve generated $250K in revenue so far, with $1M in Letters of Intent.

 

Rune: Voice chat and automated friend/squad finder for players on mobile games (like Fortnite, PUBG.) In 10 days since launch, the company says it’s got 5,000 users who spend an average of 30 minutes per day on the platform. Friendships are handled within Rune, allowing users to switch from game to game.

 

Truora:  Truora offers fast and reliable background checks for Latin America at $3 per check. Truora also collects reports of fraud by workers from its clients to create a valuable database employers will pay to access. It already has Uber, Rappi, and other top regional marketplaces using their service.

Aura Vision: Like Google Analytics for physical stores. By pulling a video feed from “any camera” in a store, Aura provides customer age, gender, and how long customers have lingered with a method they say is anonymous and doesn’t require facial recognition. The company founders say they’ll charge stores an average of $9,600 per year.

 

GeoPredict: GeoPredict aims to remove the middlemen from oil and gas real estate sales, and use AI and historical data to help evaluate acreage. They transacted roughly $100,000 last week, and charge a 5% fee.

 

Union Apartment: It’s hard for international students to find housing if they don’t speak the language, don’t have local friends, and might not even have a bank account. Union Apartment offers furnished co-living apartments for international students starting with those from China. Beyond dwellings, Union Apartment provides events like karaoke nights and services like help with banking. It’s already profitable with $130,000 in gross profit in February which makes this a $24 billion gross profit potential business.

 

jet.law: Charges flat legal fees for employment litigation, using court records to predict the workload and how much they should charge up front (rather than charging by billable hours). Co-founder Jesse Unruh previously worked in big business litigation, while co-founder Kyle Harris was a manufacturing design engineer at Apple.

Friendshop:  Friendshop lets you recruit friends to buy with you to get deals. Friendshop wants to be the US version of Pinduoduo, a $24 billion Chinese group buying company. And after its virality helps Friendshop grow in beauty, it plans to move into other consumer goods businesses.

 

Pulse Active Stations Network: Health kiosks for India, meant to be installed in train stations. Co-founder Joginder Tanikella says that there are 600,000 preventable deaths in India as many in the region don’t get regular doctor checkups. “But everyone takes train,” he says. Their in-station kiosk measures 21 health parameters. The company made $28,000 in revenue last month. Charging $1 per test, Tanikella says each machine pays for itself within 3 months. In the future, the kiosks will allow them to sell insurance and refer users to doctors.

 

Pyxai: Employers don’t have scalable ways to screen for soft skills and culture fit. Pyxai gives job applicants a 30 minute quiz that it analyzes with natural language processing to assess what they can do and if they’ll mesh with existing staff. Deemphasizing resumes could decrease discrimination in hiring. Pyxai charges $6 per screening and wants to be part of how all 36 million knowledge job openings get filled.

 

Mage: An app built specifically for buying and selling cards from Magic: The Gathering — the largest trading card game in the world. Aiming to do for Magic what GOAT did for shoe resales, their app scans, recognizes, and prices cards and helps users to list them. The company says their average customer spends $120 per month on Magic cards.

 

Geosite: Businesses that need satellite imagery have to piece it together from 40 providers, manually download the content, and upload it to their system. Geosite is a marketplace for immediately usable spatial imagery. Clients pay an annual fee, and Geosite already has $3 million in contracts with the US Air Force.

 

Community Phone: Community Phone aims to be a friendlier wireless carrier, aggregating three existing wireless networks behind a company focused on a positive customer service experience. Co-Founder James Graham says they’re currently seeing $230k in annual recurring revenue, and are profitable with a 45% margin.

Superb AI: To build artificial intelligence, you need accurately labeled training data, but services like Mechanical Turk can be slow and inaccurate. Superb AI has built an AI that assists in the labeling process to speed it up 10X, and creates its own in-house AI algorithms. Superb AI has already done $1 million in revenue in the past 7 months. For most businesses to keep up with the AIs from Google, Facebook, and the other tech giants, they’ll need help generating training data that Superb can provide.

Termius: Termius makes an SSH client that works on desktop and mobile and already has 11,000 paying customers including employees at Disney and NASA. The freemium business model is propelled by its #1 ranking in app stores for “SSH”. Next, Termius wants to expand to teams to become a full collaboration platform.

 

Verto FX: Helps businesses in Africa obtain foreign currencies needed to work with international companies. They currently support the exchange of 18 currencies. The company has seen $26M transaction volume in 5 months of private beta, with $30k monthly revenue. Co-founders Anthony Oduwole and Ola Oyetayo both have backgrounds in building technology platforms for large banks.

Inito: This app lets you measure fertility hormones using a hardware dongle that plugs into your phone. Inito can perform a hormone test and use that data to diagnose and treat conditions, and aid in planning procedures like IVF and IUI. Inito claims it can help people get pregnant faster while earning a 65 percent margin on its hardware, and that its data could help diagnose illnesses earlier.

Woke: Finances ad campaigns for budding eCommerce brands and helps them grow in exchange for a cut of the profits. In one month, they’ve onboarded 4 merchants who are giving them 50% of profits on each sale.

 

 

PNOE: They’ve built a compact breath analysis device for fitness facilities, to provide athletes with information about their cardiac/metabolic health. It’s $6,000, and is meant to replace massive $60,000 alternatives. Revenue is growing 40% per month. After fitness facilities, they aim to bring the device into healthcare centers to help with heart disease, obesity. and breathing problems.

WeatherCheck: Measures weather damage for insurance companies. The company has secured 4.7 million in annual bookings in the five months since it launched to help insurance carriers reduce their overall claims expense. To use the service, insurers upload data about their properties. WeatherCheck then monitors the weather and sends notifications to insurance companies, if, for example, a property has been damaged by hail.

 

EatGeek: After selling their last startup to GrubHub, the co-founders of Eatgeek are looking to help restaurants pull in more large-scale catering orders. Most restaurants aren’t focused on courting those looking to cater events; EatGeek opens them up to an audience of people looking specifically for these larger orders. The company takes a 20 percent commission on every order that moves through their systems, but they don’t have to worry about dealing with the food preparation or delivery.

 

Avo: Prevents human error when implementing analytics. The company says humans suck at implementing analytics. Their team of engineers and data scientists previously built QuizUp, a startup backed by Sequoia Capital that garnered 100 million users. Avo is currently being used by Skip Scooters, among other businesses.

 

Adventurous Co: Adventurous is building an augmented reality scavenger hunt that partners live actors with a mobile app that can create an interactive family activity that’s a lot more engaging than regular “screen time.” They’re launching in San Francisco with 45-60min experiences that cost $15 per person. We previously wrote about Adventurous here.

 

Globe: The startup, which has dubbed itself the “Coinbase for derivatives,” has built a cryptocurrency-derivative exchange that supports high-frequency trading. The platform allows crypto holders to trade global markets with bitcoin and grants users the same access to data leveraged by institutional investors.

 

XGenomes: XGenomes is aiming to revolutionize DNA sequencing with a low-cost, high-efficiency solution that saves time and money. The company’s solution involves laying out samples on glass slides, identifying individual sequences and using machine learning to stitch together the high resolution photos and turn these images into a full DNA sequence. The team from Oxford and Harvard say that the market XGenomes is targeting is now larger than $6.5 billion.

 

Habitat Logistics: A food delivery startup that doesn’t have a consumer mobile app but helps restaurants make deliveries. What sets them apart from competitors?  The company only delivers to restaurants that are within 10 minutes of a customer’s home, saving them time on long deliveries. Restaurants ping Habitat when they have delivery needs and the company sends a driver to complete the delivery. Habitat says they are growing 17 percent month over month, currently collecting $110,000 monthly revenue by charging restaurants per delivery.

 

WorkClout: WorkClout is building software to help manufacturers manage their operations in a cohesive product. The team says 56 percent of all manufacturers still manage their software on paper and Excel, WorkClout makes it much easier to spot inefficiencies and improve workflows. The team is focusing on customers in the packaging manufacturing space first, and is looking to tackle food and beverage companies and textile manufacturers next.

 

PadPiper: A marketplace for finding monthly housing and compatible roommates. The company helps interns find the right place to live, with the right roommates, partnering with big companies who need to help their interns navigate the housing market. The founders say they had to move 35 times in five years for academic reasons and were disappointed by Craigslist and other options. PadPiper has $10,000 in monthly revenue and says it’s growing 37 percent week-over-week.

 

DevFlight: DevFlight wants to revamp the business model for open-source software. They’re building a marketplace to pair open-sourced developer with companies. DevFlight works with the company and developers to create a plan that helps both parties understand the scope of the project. DevFlight takes a 25 percent transaction on the deals.

Handle.com: Automates the collection process of unpaid construction invoices. Construction companies are often forced to pay for their own jobs when customers are late on payments. According to Handle, there are $104 billion in unpaid construction invoices every year. Handle launched six weeks ago and is currently collecting $22,800 in monthly revenue. The founders previously launched an Andreessen Horowitz-backed company called Tenfold.

 

Gerostate Alpha: Gerostate Alpha is tackling human aging, an ambitious goal. The three co-founders are all academics at the Buck Institute where they’ve spent years researching aging. They’ve used their proprietary platform for drug discovery to quickly parse 90,000 compounds and identify 150 hits for further research.

 

Trestle: Founded by a former employee of Stripe, a fellow Y Combinator grad, Trestle provides companies a home page/easy-to-use intranet with profiles of each employee. The company is already working with Brex, Plaid and others to help employees feel less isolated and work more productively amongst each other.

Green Energy Exchange: Green Energy Exchange wants to give consumers a choice in where they get their energy. The virtual utility co. plans to let consumers choose where their renewable energy comes from — at least in the 12 states where that’s legal. The founder previously ran a large multi-billion dollar energy company and now wants to make choosing your energy supplier as easy as paying for Netflix by partnering directly with solar and wind generators. The startup is launching in Texas next month.

 

rct studio: Led by a team of YC alums behind Raven, an AI startup acquired by Baidu in 2017, rct studio is a creative studio for immersive and interactive film. The platform provides a real time “text to render “engine (so the text “A man sits on a sofa” would generate 3D imagery of a man sitting on a sofa) that supports mainstream 3D engines like Unity and Unreal, as well as a creative tool for film professionals to craft immersive and open-ended entertainment experiences called Morpheus Engine.

 

CredPal: CredPal is building a credit card company for Africa that looks to help the 200 million in Africa’s neglected middle class that lack access to formal credit, the startup says. The company hopes to become the next American Express and bring African consumers more convenience and freedom in how they purchase goods.

 

Calii: The company helps consumers in Latin America save money by directly connecting them to producers of fruits and vegetables. Cutting out the middlemen saves consumers lots of cash, say the founders. The Latin American companies are taking Chinese behemoth Pinduoduo’s business model and applying it to a different geography, like Rappi and Grin have done before them.

 

Nabis: Nabis is tackling the cannabis shipping and logistics business, working with suppliers to ship out goods to retailers reliably. It’s illegal for FedEx to ship weed so Nabis has swooped in and is helping ship and connect while taking cuts of the proceeds, a price the suppliers are willing to pay due to their 98 percent on-time shipping record.

 

Nettrons: A no-human-in-the-loop AI talent sourcer meant to make the recruiting process more efficient. The company has three paying companies who they’ve helped make six hires to date. Nettrons, founded by a pair of engineers, says their target market is worth $1 billion.

 

Fuzzbuzz: Fuzzing is the process of throwing mountains of invalid data at code to find bugs. Fuzzbuzz is looking to simplify the process of fuzzing for developers, taking a long complicated setup and turning it into a 30 minute process that automates the easy parts and connects with existing services like Jira, Github and Slack.

 

Interprime: Provides “Apple level” treasury services to startups. Startups are raising a lot of money with no way to manage it, says Interprime. They want to help these businesses by managing these big investments. They take a .25 percent advisory fee for all the investment they oversee. So far, they have $10 million in investment capital they are servicing.

Taali Foods: Taali Foods is looking to create a new healthy snack food, starting off with a popcorn replacement made from popped water lily seeds. The snacks ditch artificial flavoring, ingredients or preservatives and delivers serial snackers a healthier option with 67% less fat and 20% less calories than regular popcorn.

 

Gordian Software: An API for travel booking companies to sell seat selection and checked bags. Right now, Gordian is profitable and earning $65,000 per month offering online travel agencies tools to help them sell seating, baggage and other ancillary products. Gordian has three major pilots in the works, including one with lastminute.com.

 

Shiok Meats: A cell-based clean shrimp meat provider founded by a team of scientists. Compared to other shrimp on the market, Shiok says their cell-based shrimp meat is more sustainable and taste the same as regular shrimp. The shrimp meat is grown in bioreactors, similar to brewing beer. The startup is targeting the Asia-Pacific shrimp market, which it says is worth $25 billion.

 

Hatch: Hatch is looking to keep the conversations between franchise businesses and their customers moving along and driving sales all the while. The team is focusing on text, email and voice automation to push revenue at their customers which includes Jeep, Ashley Homestore and Rent-A-Center. The company is profitable and earning $119,000 per month.

 

Bot Orange: A customer communication system built on WeChat that integrates sales, marketing and more. WeChat currently offers no tools to companies to manage customers. Bot Orange will be that customer management tool within the app, helping businesses manage various channels without having to navigate another third-party tool.

 

Postscript: Postscript is working with online commerce brands to contact customers on smartphones via SMS. The startup wants to be a Mailchimp for texts, automating conversations between mobile-savvy millennial consumers and companies that are increasingly focused on direct-to-consumer and subscription models. We wrote about Postscript on TechCrunch here.

 

Tailor-ED: Launched by a pair of Stanford grads, the startup helps teachers create tailored lesson plans by sending short quizzes to groups of students to figure out the best lesson plans for those students. In the last four weeks, 2,500 students have received lessons from Tailor-ED. Operating under a freemium model, the company says they are targeting a $1.5 billion market.


Wallets Africa: African debit cards often don’t let users pay for international services like Netflix. Wallets Africa is building a digital bank that brings support to many of these online purchases via a partnership with Visa. The team is currently processing $3.5 million in purchases every month.

 

AuroraQ: A developer of a “practical” quantum computer. The founder has a Ph.D. in quantum physics and says AuroraQ will be the “Dell of quantum computing,” building integrated computers from quantum components, which is must less costly.

 

Probably Genetic: Probably Genetic is selling direct-to-consumer DNA tests, aiming to help Americans diagnose whether they are one of the 15 million undiagnosed people in the country that have a rare genetic disease. The co-founders say that on average it takes people more than 7 years to get diagnosed, and Probably Genetic hopes to change that with their $1,200 test which they will be launching in 12 weeks.

 

Viosera Therapeutics: Uses AI to predict and block drug resistance in cancer and bacteria. The startup has treated its solution with mice infected with MRSA and were able to cure 100 percent of the infected mice. The company is targeting MRSA patients initially with its drug discovery platform. Viosera says it is beginning clinical trials in the next six months.

 

Upsolve: Upsolve wants to helps low-income individuals file for bankruptcy more easily. The non-profit service gets referral fees from pointing non low-income families to bankruptcy lawyers and is able to offer the service for free. The company says that medical bills, layoffs and predatory loans can leave low-income families in dire situations and that in the last 6 months, their non-profit has alleviated customers from $24 million in debt.

 

AllSome:  Virtual warehouses and fulfillment for online sellers in Southeast Asia. How it works: customers ship their inventory to AllSome’s warehouse space, and AllSome handles quality assurance, storage, labelling, packaging and shipping. AllSome’s founders say the company is profitable.

 

BearBuzz: BearBuzz is building an influencer marketplace that moves things along much more quickly than today’s negotiation slog. They’ve standardized ad formats and can automatically verify the video ads via image and voice recognition. The team plans to make money by facilitating these quicker connections and taking 25 percent of adspend.

 

Point: A digital bank offering a debit card with rewards and a better user experience. The company is going live with virtual debit cards and checking accounts next month. 

 

MyScoot: MyScoot wants to help urban millennials make friends in India with their platform for home-hosted social events. Users can search the service and pay to attend events. MyScoot looks to keep things safe for attendees through background checks, peer reviews and what they’re calling a “social trust scoring algorithm.” They have had more than 1000 bookings through their app, with 60% of users returning after booking their first event.

 

Memfault: A developer of tools for engineers at embedded hardware companies that they say are as good as tools available for mobile engineers. Memfault is used for deployment, monitoring and analytics. So far, they have four customers and $5,500 in monthly recurring revenue.

 

Board: Board is a mortgage company that lets home buyers lock down a house with an all-cash offer. Cash buyers are 4 times more likely to win in a bidding war and often save tens of thousands off of a property’s purchase price compared to those with mortgages. They’re looking to be a cash buyer for the 80 percent of people who need a mortgage, by approving people for these massive loans and then making 2 percent off the mortgage.

 

Portal Entryways: Portal automatically opens doors for wheelchair users and keeps them open until they’ve gone through. Many existing accessibility buttons are out of reach, or too far from doors to be helpful; Portal uses a smartphone app on the user’s phone to control these existing buttons (modified with Portal’s hardware), effectively hitting the button for them. Portal is focusing on public places with many doors at first, like universities and malls.   We wrote about Portal Entryways on TechCrunch here.

 

Blueberry Medical: A pediatric telemedicine company that provides medical care instantly to families. Blueberry provides constant contact, the ability to talk to a pediatrician 24/7 and at-home testing kits for a total of $8 per month. They’ve just completed a paid consumer pilot and were able to resolve 50 percent of issues without in-person care. They’ve partnered with insurance providers to reduce ER visits.

 

Maitian.ai: Maitian is building the next generation of vending machines, taking notes from the hotel mini-bar fridge and allowing businesses to sell food in a way that’s friendlier than the average vending machine. Users swipe their credit card, open the door to the machine and pick out what they want. The team is focusing on South East Asia and has launched in 2 locations.

 

Emi Labs: Is developing a virtual assistant for human resources workers that automates the hiring process for low-skilled jobs. The startup counts Burger King and PwC as customers, with a total market size of $2.4 billion. Emi Labs improves the candidate experience by making the hiring process more personalized to them using AI.

 

Latchel: Latchel is building a maintenance platform for property managements that helps them free up their time by processing requests and dispatching contractors to fix the issues. Latchel makes up to $10 per unit per month for property managers and charges a 10 percent referral fee to contractors when they source them for jobs.

 

Alpaca: Is developing an API for free stock trading to replace legacy software. The founders say Alpaca’s commission-free stock trading API is the first and only broker dealer that understands developers, and it allows customers to build and trade with real-time market data free of cost.

 

 

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The best portable projectors for 2021

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We love the idea of casting a large screen whether it’s to binge-watch a series over the weekend, deliver business presentations during the weekdays, or project photos from the smartphone anytime in between. These conveniences grow manifold with the portable projectors that are mini-sized to fit right into your backpack and transform any surface into a large screen, ideally 100-inch plus, without any hassle.

We have rounded up the best 4K ultra-short throw projectors on the market previously. But if that’s not your budget or it doesn’t really fall in your scope somehow, here’s a list of (in no particular order) the best mini projectors worth your cash. Some of these may feel old but they are as good to hit the road with. Without ado then – here are the best portable projectors in 2021.

ViewSonic M2

There is still time before you start traveling for business like you did say about two years back. When you do, the ViewSonic M2 will be the right portable projector to haul along in the bag for presentation anytime, anywhere. The full HD (1920x1080p resolution) LED projector is compact for office settings and lightweight to be carried along. It provides 1,200 lumens of brightness and offers over 30,000 hours of light source usage.

What We Like

– Interesting kickstand design
– Good brightness
– Dual Harman Kardon speakers

What We Don’t Like

– No built-in battery

The $732.99 ViewSonic M2 is even more interesting because of its short throw lens that allows the projector to cast up to 100-inches from only 9 feet away. Built-in dual Harman Kardon Bluetooth speakers for amazing audio, the projector runs Android and lets users download apps to project directly for entertainment. The ViewSonic M2 supports HDMI and USB Type-C input modes and is compatible with PCs, Macs, smartphones and all sorts of media players.

AAXA P7

AAXA P7 is one of the smallest mini projectors to deliver true native 1080p resolution. This next-gen solid-state mini projector integrates compact 4th generation Texas Instruments Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology – found in movie theaters – to makes the native 1920×1080 pixel resolution possible.

What We Like

– Full HD resolution
– Great performance for its size
– Delivers big picture in low light

What We Don’t Like

– Limited contrast ratio
– No zoom

Provided with rated brightness of 600 lumens, better than some of the other projectors in a similar form factor, the AAXA P7 doesn’t support Wi-Fi but comes with VGA, USB and HDMI options for connectivity. It also features a card reader to project content directly. The versatility of this compact projector is supported by a tripod provided alongside. Backed with 30,000 hours luminous LEDs, the P7 projector produces a 120-inch image. Its MSRP has been dropped to $419 from the initial $499.

Epson EpiqVision Mini EF12

One of the more refined portable projectors from Epson, the EF12 touts 1920 x 1080 pixel resolution with 1,000 lumens brightness. Designed primarily for streaming enthusiasts in the work-from-home era, this 4K compatible (downconvert), smart streaming laser projector comes with built-in Android TV and support for HDR.

What We Like

– Up to 150-inch projection
– Built-in Android TV for direct access to apps
– Nice design, superior sound

What We Don’t Like

– Limited brightness and contrast

If you want to continue your binge-watching sessions on a screen measuring up to 150-inches, pack it and take it along in your travel bag after use, the $899.99 Epson EF12 is a delightful option. It lets you play movies, series and videos directly from Hulu, HBO or YouTube over wireless connectivity with true audio by Yamaha, right out of the box.

LG CineBeam PH550

The extremely portable and lightweight LG CineBeam PH550 LED projector features built-in TV tuner and can project TV shows with nice video and image quality. The LED-based DLP projector comes with 550 lumens rated brightness but is slightly low on resolution. The projector has only 1,280 x 720 pixel resolution and it delivers up to 100-inch screen.It is priced at $499.

What We Like

– Small structure big delivery
– Onboard rechargeable battery
– Built-in TV tuner

What We Don’t Like

– Very low resolution
– Expensive

Enabling entertainment or a professional set up is not at all difficult with this LG projector. It is Bluetooth compatible and features an HDMI port. It comes packed with a rechargeable battery onboard offering 2.5 hours of backup. The LG PH550 features wireless mirroring to connect with a smartphone or tablet and has 30,000 hours lamp life (virtually it will never need replacement).

Anker Nebula Solar

While the Anker Nebula Capsule II is a very capable projector in its own right, our preference lies with the Solar Portable. Arguably, Anker Nebula Solar is the finest portable projector in the company’s portfolio with the right blend of features to deliver immaculate picture quality both outdoors and indoors. It can be mistaken for a solar-powered projector because of its moniker, but the Nebula model is far from renewably powered. It does come with built-in battery.

What We Like

– Great features for its petite size
– Decent picture and sound
– High resolution and HDR support

What We Don’t Like

– Dreary sound

The Nebula Solar features 1080p resolution and supports HDR10. It can cast up to 120-inches screen with a good degree of brightness for impressive picture quality. The projector has 400 lumens of brightness and it runs Android TV. The onboard battery runs for almost 3 hours but this can be beefed up with the provided USB-C charging cable. Currently Anker is selling it at $469.99.

Kodak Luma 350

A flagship offering in the Luma series of Kodak’s palmtop projectors, the Kodak Luma 350 is powered by Android to let the users download apps in a jiffy and stream content directly without the phone’s intervention. The projector comes with Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, HDMI and USB for connectivity.

What We Like

– Built-in Android
– Rechargeable battery onboard
– Plenty of connectivity options

What We Don’t Like

– Average video quality
– Very minimal resolution

Preinstalled with apps like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, Twitch and YouTube, this LED-based DLP projector delivers content in 150 ANSI lumens brightness. The projector has an 854x480p resolution, 3,500:1 contrast ratio and is designed primarily for casual video watching. Built-in with 3-watt speaker, the LED projector has a rated lifetime of 30,000 hours and features 7,500mAh battery, good enough to last a couple of days between charges. The $536.99 price tag has been slashed by Kodak and you can pick one up for $299.99.

ASUS ZenBeam Latte L1

A new member on the block, the ASUS ZenBeam Latte L1 LED projector has a slightly low native resolution of 720p and 300 lumens brightness, but that doesn’t stop it from delivering up to 120-inch screen with minimum picture distortion or color difference. The coffee mug-shaped projector features operative controls on the top in circular orientation and includes wireless smartphone mirroring, USB Type-A and HDMI for connectivity.

What We Like

– Lovely design
– Powerful 10W Bluetooth speaker

What We Don’t Like

– Average brightness and resolution
– Lacks USB charging

Interestingly, ASUS packs the ZenBeam Latte L1 with a 6000mAh battery that provides the compact LED projector video playback time of 3 hours and 12 hours in case of audio. It features a rather powerful Harman Kardon 10W Bluetooth stereo speaker that enhances the bass and overall audio for an authentic theatre-esque experience.

Xgimi MoGo Pro

Xgimi MoGo Pro is one of the more versatile portable projectors you can lay your hands on. The compact 1080p resolution projector delivers impressive picture quality with decent contrast and features Android TV to stream movies and tons of other content without having to connect to an external device like a phone or a media player.

What We Like

– Runs Android TV with Chromecast
– Appealing design
– Doubles as Bluetooth speaker

What We Don’t Like

– No card reader
– No USB-Type C

The MoGo Pro works at Full HD with HDR support and also accepts 4K only to downconvert it to the supported resolution. Built-in with dual 3-watt speakers, the MoGo Pro supports both for output and input, meaning the projector can be used as a Bluetooth speaker. The projection from Xgimi’s device is pretty bright thanks to the 300 ANSI lumens of rated brightness. The battery onboard the projector lasts 2 hours while playing video in full brightness and almost 30 mins are increased in energy-saving mode.

Final thought

There is so much variety in the portable projectors currently available. Amid this list of options – or others that didn’t make it – your choice will depend on the requirement and budget. Of importance is also the type of content you want to stream (your need) and the size of the projection image you want.

Then finally you can arrive at a budget for a mini projector. A projector like this may not be a TV alternative in a bright room but in dimmer lighting the image quality is good and its space-saving aesthetics weigh heavier.

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OnePlus Buds Pro are here, should you buy or ditch

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The OnePlus Buds Pro have been finally launched. The company bills it as the “most advanced listening device” in the portfolio that now adds the third set of TWS earbuds. The advanced earbuds have been revealed alongside the OnePlus Nord 2 and there’s enough reason to be excited.

The new pair of buds are a major step up from the OnePlus Buds released last year as OnePlus looks to take on the popular options in the market with features that seem hard to ignore. So, should you jump the gun and buy the Buds Pro or wait for the other options? Let’s delve into the details to help you make a measured decision.

Design and looks

There has been a major design overhaul from the original OnePlus Buds with shorter stems and a horn-like driver casing profile. They get a more modernized aesthetic shape that seems to flow immaculately. This is well complemented by the dual-tone finish with matte plastic for the upper half and a cool shiny metal plating adorning the stems.

The design is definitely distinct from the other options on the market, and so far we love it. The same design language flows to its charging case that now has a lying down flat profile (compared to the original having vertical profile) where the earbuds rest. This also assists in the wireless charging aesthetics of the buds via Qi-certified pads/mats.

Another design feature worth mentioning is the freedom of using silicone replaceable eartips (in three sizes) as compared to the predecessor. This ensures you get a desired secure fit, which in turn helps in blocking out ambient noise for the ANC to work like a charm.

Specs and features

The biggest feature coming to the OnePlus Buds Pro is the smart adaptive noise cancellation. This helps toggle the amount of active noise cancellation being applied depending on the environment. The earbuds have three microphones each for either bud, capable of filtering noise levels almost up to 40dB. A big advantage over fixed level ANC earbuds that have a handful of presets only.

The 11mm dynamic driver delivers a punchy sound and with the Dolby Atmos audio, the earbuds are a pleasure for listening. For those who like the idea of binaural sounds, the earbuds come with the Zen Mode Air feature to play white noise in a jiffy via the headphone settings or the Hey Melody app.

OnePlus Buds Pro have the latest Bluetooth 5.2 for connectivity that promises stable connection and 94ms ultra-low latency Pro Gaming mode. Another highlight is the addition of IP55 water and dust resistance rating making this new accessory perfect for workouts and running as well. Even the charging case gets an IPX4 water resistance rating, which is an added bonus for the outdoorsy.

Battery life and charging

The battery of the OnePlus Buds Pro goes on for seven hours on a single charge without ANC and five hours with ANC enabled. That number can be stretched up to a duration of 28 hours (with ANC) and 38 hours in normal listening mode via the charging case.

Where the earbuds edge slightly ahead of the competition is the fast charging support courtesy of the Warp Charging technology. So we are talking about 10 hours of playback time with just 10-minutes of charging via the USB-C. Add to this the ability to charge the case by placing it on the back of a OnePlus 9 Pro, if you happen to own the phone.

Price and release date

The earbuds are all set to release in Europe on August 25 and in the U.S. and Canada on September 1, 2021. They might just nudge ahead of AirPods 3 or the Samsung Galaxy Buds 2 in terms of the release date, which will be a slight advantage to win over the eager buyers. The OnePlus Buds Pro will come in two color options – white or matte black.

OnePlus Buds Pro will arrive at $149 – a lot more than the OnePlus Buds’ initial price tag of $79. However, they are more feature rich and look absolutely amazing compared to the predecessor. Given they have a nice ANC mode that price tag will be just right for many buyers. Of course, they do undercut the AirPods Pro by a good margin.

Options to consider

Given the number of options, the ones that are most reliable in terms of feature to price ratio have to be AirPods Pro, Beats and LG TONE Free FN7. Depending on what you want from the earbuds, some features you might miss more than others, it is good to have a four-way choice as all of these are interesting in their own right.

If price is a major consideration, the Beats Studio Buds are also a very feasible option depending on what features you value more. As an overall package, LG TONE Free FN7 earbuds are the best bet –given their set of features (bacteria-killing UVnano tech) and the balanced price point.

AirPods Pro brings added features like transparency mode or even a couple of extra microphones, but other than that, they are fairly comparable. OnePlus instead nudges ahead in some comparisons like the battery life, water-resistance rating and Bluetooth connectivity.

You would not want to count out the upcoming Nothing Ear (1) earbuds by Carl Pei, former co-owner OnePlus. The ANC earbuds are aggressively priced at $99 and they also boast impressive features. The niche earbuds is the first product developed by the tech wizard, and it’s already backed by some big names in the audio and tech industry.

Wrap up

It goes without saying, OnePlus has hit the nail on its head with the Buds Pro. The Chinese OEM has a very competitive feature list that’ll appeal to most buyers at the given price. OnePlus has truly made a leap forward from the previous offerings here, and there is no reason audio lovers will not cherish using them. Now that the availability has been announced, the decision to wait for other options like AirPods 3 or Galaxy Buds 2 is dependent on what you really desire.

However, in the current scenario, there is little reason for you to shy away from the Buds Pro. Until they land in our court and we review them thoroughly, the decision will largely depend on how the Buds Pro looks on paper. On paper, the earbuds look exciting, and they should do well in real-life usage too.

For us, they are a definite yes at this point in time. The attractive design sets them apart from the crowd that still follows more or less the same measured design approach.

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iPad mini rumors may have one key detail wrong: Analyst weighs in

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Apple is expected to release an updated iPad mini tablet later this year, one that may feature a mini-LED display. The latter rumor is a contentious one, with multiple claims that are at odds with each other. Only a day after a leak claiming the new model will feature a mini-LED panel, an analyst is stating otherwise.

Yesterday, July 22, a report surfaced at DigiTimes that claimed the next iPad mini model will feature a mini-LED display, building upon rumors that Apple will reveal a sixth-generation iPad mini model this year. Such hopes may have been quickly dashed, however, at least when it comes to the display.

A day later, analyst Ross Young took to Twitter to directly counter the DigiTimes report, saying simply, “No miniLED iPad Mini this year. Digitimes (sic) story was not correct.” Young went on to clarify that his statement referred to an iPad mini model for 2021, noting that he confirmed the details with Apple’s “supposed miniLED supplier.”

The analyst likewise points out that mini-LED displays are reserved for Apple’s high-end products, of which the iPad mini doesn’t qualify. Though this miniature slate has managed to persist through five solid generations, it doesn’t offer the same features as its larger siblings.

The iPad mini — at least in its current 5th-generation iteration — features Touch ID as with the base $329 iPad. Rumors claim the alleged 6th-generation model will feature around the same 7.9-inch display as the current version, likely also retaining Apple Pencil support while adding more powerful hardware.

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