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How 5G network builders are competing with Huawei in Asia

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Huawei ban: Winners, losers, and what’s at stake (a whole lot)
ZDNet’s Jason Cipriani and Jason Perlow talk with Karen Roby about how the security and trade brouhaha impacts everything from the future of regional carriers and the bottom lines of tech giants to 5G’s prospects and consumer’s pocketbooks. Read more: https://zd.net/2WzVRbq

Mobile infrastructure firms believe that over the next few years, LTE networks in Asia will be replaced with higher-capacity, lower-latency 5G networks. These 5G networks will be the new backend for applications ranging from mobile e-sports, autonomous vehicle communications, to virtually-controlled robotic surgeries.

But if companies want a piece of Asia’s developing markets, Samsung, ZTE, Nokia, Ericsson, and other equipment providers will need to compete with the low-cost offerings of Huawei.

In terms of commercial 5G deals globally, only Finland’s Nokia and Sweden’s Ericsson come close to the Shenzen-based firm. Huawei has publicly announced 40 deals compared to Nokia’s 38 and Ericsson’s 18. But Huawei spent about $15 billion on R&D in 2018, significantly more than the combined $9 billion spent by Nokia and Ericsson.

“This massive spending gives Huawei the capacity to make lower cost chips and routers,” Subramanian Venkatraman, an analyst at Arizona-based MTN Consulting, told ZDNet in an email conversation.

“This is one of the reasons European operators have been reluctant to completely ban Huawei’s kit.”

Nokia and Ericsson told ZDNet that their key to competing in Asia would be partnerships with device makers and operators, as well as their proven track records.

Also see: The winner in the war on Huawei is Samsung

Kai Sahala, head of Nokia’s Asia Pacific and Japan 5G Sales, told ZDNet that 5G spectrum availability in Asia is delaying development outside of the main Japanese, South Korean and Chinese markets, but that his firm is seeing opportunity in Vietnam, Malaysia, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, and Singapore.

“We are competing with all of the vendors, including Huawei, in many markets, and we have been successful,” he said.

“That tells that there’s something in our position, and our 5G offering especially.”

Sahala says the firm is taking several approaches to market for countries in the Asia region.

“I don’t think these things are negotiated solely on price, [but also] quality, reliability, openness of interfaces, things like security and the platforms that we can offer,” he said.

Although he admits there have been stumbling blocks, such as the initial spotty performance and delays for the 5G network rollout in South Korea.

“In the big picture, it’s really about the long-term performance,” he said. “Performance by independent studies [of our 4G networks] is really outstanding”.

Erik Kruse, an Internet of Things Ecosystem Partner Manager at Ericsson, told ZDNet his firm was competing on 5G with cost, performance, and reliability.

Some see the recent US restrictions on Huawei, which prevents US firms from collaborating or supplying components to Huawei, as a factor for competition.

Read: Now Arm tells staff to stop working with Huawei

Multiple sources have said the restrictions have forced Huawei to place some projects as “pending” while also “slowing down” others, such as those in its server business. One said Huawei had already ordered a large amount of components in the first quarter of 2019, giving it a temporary buffer from U.S. supply chain availability issues.

But Steve Cheng, Vice President and General Manager of Taiwan’s Quanta Computer, told ZDNet that it’s difficult to compete with Huawei’s low costs, and he believes US restrictions will give other players a better chance to develop the 5G market.

Sahala said Nokia has a “neutral” position on the restrictions, as they are decided by governments, but is continuing to keep an eye on the developing situation. Kruse and a spokesperson for Ericsson, meanwhile, declined to comment on the Huawei restrictions.

Ultimately, will Huawei come out as a front-runner?

Caroline Chan, Data Center Group vice president and 5G infrastructure division general manager at Intel, told ZDNet that the US firm would comply with the US government’s order on Huawei — a “tricky situation” — but said that there’s no clear front-runner for 5G in Asia as yet.

“Everybody is realising there is a huge potential to get there,” she said. “The question is investment priority and how aggressive and courageous you are.”

Related Coverage

SoftBank goes with Ericsson and Nokia for 5G network

Japanese telco goes with Swedish and Finnish equipment manufacturers.

First 5G laptop: Lenovo and Qualcomm showcase always-on PC due in early 2020

Is this ‘Project Limitless’ 5G PC the future of computing?

Tech trade war: After Huawei, which Chinese firms are next on US enemies list?

If the cold war with China intensifies, more companies with alleged ties to the Chinese government could be prohibited from doing business with American firms.

Japan telcos pull back sale of new Huawei smartphones

Citing consumer safety concerns and uncertainty over Google’s Android support, SoftBank and KDDI have delayed the sale of new handsets from the Chinese vendor, specifically, the Huawei P30 lite, which had been slated to hit the local market on May 24.

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How To Build Your Own Retro Gaming Console With A Raspberry Pi

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Once your micro SD card is mounted with RetroPie, you can plug it into your fully assembled Raspberry Pi 4 and begin the setup process in the software menu that appears. Make sure your controller is nearby, as you’ll need it during the first boot process. If you’re using a USB controller, make sure it’s connected physically, then follow the instructions on-screen.

If you’re using a Bluetooth controller, tap F4 on your USB keyboard to exit back into the Linux command prompt screen, then type and execute the command “sudo ~/RetroPie-S etup/retropie-setup.sh” that loads you into a backend RetroPie menu. Navigate to the Bluetooth option and then open it to begin searching for a controller. Set your Bluetooth controller to sync mode, then pair it in the menu. Return to the Linux command prompt and type the command “sudo shutdown -r now”. Upon loading back into RetroPie, you should be able to use your Bluetooth controller by simply turning it on and following the on-screen menu. Once everything is complete, you’ll end up on another menu with the option RASPI-CONFIG, which you should now select.

Upon tapping that option, you’ll be taken to the main configuration menu for RetroPie, which includes all sorts of different settings. Go ahead and configure whichever settings you need. It’s also a good idea to navigate to Advanced Settings and disable Overscan if you’re using an HDTV. From here, you should be able to load your ROMs (stored on your SD card) and play them from the menu that appears when you boot up RetroPie. Check out the RetroPie documentation for troubleshooting any issues you may encounter, and happy gaming!

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Today’s Wordle Answer #377 – July 1, 2022 Word Solution And Hints

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The solution for the July 1, 2022, edition of Wordle is pinto. It made its way to the English vocabulary from the Spanish word pinto, which refers to a subject that is spotted or mottled. Horses with a patchy coloration, especially those rocking white patches, are affectionately known as pinto.

The word traces its etymological roots to the Latin term pinctus, which is used to describe something that has been painted over. The pinto bean, which is a staple in Mexican, Spanish, and Brazilian cuisines, also gets its name from the patchy color profile of its outer skin. According to Ancestry data, Pinto is a popular Catalan name that eventually made its way to the Indian subcontinent with the advent of Portuguese invaders.

Interestingly, it is also used to describe a person with greying hair, something pop culture describes as a salt-and-pepper look. You can trace the history of Pinto family migration across the U.S. and Canada in the 19th century here. As for famous personalities with that surname, the actress described above is Freida Pinto, while the footballer in question is José Manuel Pinto. Meanwhile, Fernão Mendes Pinto was a renowned Portuguese explorer and writer who also has a crater on the planet Mercury named after him.

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This New $6 Raspberry Pi Is The Computer The DIY Smart Home Needs

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In terms of hardware, the Raspberry Pi Pico W is identical to its predecessor; it sports the same RP2040 Arm Cortex M0+ Dual-Core SoC, which is based on TSMC’s 40nm low power manufacturing process. This chip clocks up to 133MHz and also packs in 264KB of SRAM. There is 2MB of onboard flash storage thrown in, as well. Additionally, the machine features a 40-pin GPIO just like the original Pico from 2021. The onboard micro USB controller can be used for data transfer and receiving power.

The Wi-Fi module on the Raspberry Pi Pico is the Infineon CYW43439 wireless that, apart from supporting 2.4GHz Wi-Fi networks, also adds Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low-Energy support. However, as of now, Raspberry has chosen not to enable Bluetooth capability in the machine. The company does not rule out the possibility of enabling Bluetooth further down the line, though.

With over 2 million Raspberry Pi Pico boards in the hands of consumers, the company expects its new model to enjoy similar success. The company also believes that the ongoing chip shortage has been among the prime reasons for the popularity of the RP2040-based Raspberry Pi Pico. The Pico W, thanks to its newfound wireless capability, will continue to be a great product that can power many IoT-based applications and DIY smart home needs. With a price tag of $6, the Raspberry Pi Pico W costs just $2 more than its predecessor. As the ecosystem for starter microcontrollers evolves, the $6 you spend on the Pico W will definitely be a worthwhile investment.

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