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How Roblox avoided the gaming graveyard and grew into a $2.5B company – TechCrunch

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There are successful companies that grow fast and garner tons of press. Then there’s Roblox, a company which took at least a decade to hit its stride and has, relative to its current level of success, barely gotten any recognition or attention.

Why has Roblox’s story gone mostly untold? One reason is that it emerged from a whole generation of gaming portals and platforms. Some, like King.com, got lucky or pivoted their business. Others by and large failed.

Once companies like Facebook, Apple and Google got to the gaming scene, it just looked like a bad idea to try to build your own platform — and thus not worth talking about. Added to that, founder and CEO Dave Baszucki seems uninterested in press.

But overall, the problem has been that Roblox just seemed like an insignificant story for many, many years. The company had millions of users, sure. So did any number of popular games. In its early days, Roblox even looked like Minecraft, a game that was released long after Roblox went live, but that grew much, much faster.

Yet here we are today: Roblox now claims that half of all American children aged 9-12 are on its platform. It has jumped to 90 million monthly unique users and is poised to go international, potentially multiplying that number. And it’s unique. Essentially all other distribution services offering games through a portal have eventually fizzled, aside from some distant cousins like Steam.

This is the story of how Roblox not only survived, but built a thriving platform.

Seeds of an idea

(Photo by Steve Jennings/Getty Images for TechCrunch)

Before Roblox, there was Knowledge Revolution, a company that made teaching software. While designed to allow students to simulate physics experiments, perhaps predictably, they also treated it like a game.

“The fun seemed to be in building your own experiment,” says Baszucki. “When people were playing it and we went into schools and labs, they were all making car crashes and buildings fall down, making really funny stuff.” Provided with a sandbox, kids didn’t just make dry experiments about mass or velocity — they made games, or experiences they could show off to friends for a laugh.

Knowledge Revolution was founded in 1989, by Dave Baszucki and his brother Greg (who didn’t later co-found Roblox, but is now on its board). Nearly a decade later, it was acquired for $20 million by MSC Software, which made professional simulation tools. Dave continued there for another four years before leaving to become an angel investor.

Baszucki put money into Friendster, a company that pre-dated Facebook and MySpace in the social networking category. That investment seeded another piece of the idea for Roblox. Taken together, the legacy of Knowledge Revolution and Friendster were the two key components undergirding Roblox: a physics sandbox with strong creation tools, and a social graph.

Baszucki himself is a third piece of the puzzle. Part of an older set of entrepreneurs, which might be called the Steve Jobs generation, Baszucki’s archetype seems closer to Mr. Rogers than Jobs himself: unfailingly polite and enthusiastic, never claiming superior insight, and preferring to pass credit for his accomplishments on to others. In conversation, he shows interests both central and tangential to Roblox, like virtual environments, games, education, digital identity and the future of tech. Somewhere in this heady mix, the idea of Roblox came about.

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Report: Stadia undershot to the tune of “hundreds of thousands” of users

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Enlarge / As we learn more about Stadia’s inner workings, we’ve begun adding some “flair” to this Stadia-branded PUBG parachute.

PUBG / Getty Images / Aurich Lawson

In the wake of Google shutting down its Stadia Games & Entertainment (SG&E) group, leaks about the underwhelming game-streaming service have started to emerge. A Friday Bloomberg report, citing unnamed Stadia sources, attaches a new number to the failures: “hundreds of thousands” fewer controllers sold and “monthly active users” (MAU) logging in than Google had anticipated.

The controller sales figure is central to the story told Friday by Bloomberg’s Jason Schreier: that internally, Google was of two minds about how Stadia should launch. One idea looked back at some of the company’s biggest successes, particularly Gmail, which launched softly in a public, momentum-building beta while watching how it was received over time. The other, championed by Stadia lead Phil Harrison, was to treat Stadia like a console, complete with some form of hardware that could be hyped and pre-sold. In Stadia’s case, the latter won out, with Harrison bullishly selling a Stadia Founder’s Bundle—and this worked out to be a $129.99 gate to the service. Without it, you couldn’t access Stadia for its first few months.

As Schreier reports, Harrison and the Stadia leadership team “had come from the world of traditional console development and wanted to follow the route they knew.”

Stadiamagotchi?

As part of his Stadia-launch mission, Harrison approved deals costing “tens of millions of dollars” to woo publishers like Take-Two and Ubisoft to launch their games on Stadia, Schreier reports. Exactly how many millions of dollars Stadia spent on these deals is unknown, but Schreier claims that “the amount of money Google was willing to spend came as a shock to veteran game developers,” which implies a figure larger than $10 million.

Even with such a financial incentive in his pocket, however, Take-Two CEO Stauss Zelnick eventually admitted to shareholders that gamer uptake for Stadia didn’t meet his previously optimistic expectations. As he said in June 2020: “The launch of Stadia has been slow. I think there was some overpromising on what the technology could deliver and some consumer disappointment as a result.”

The article mostly retreads the messy, public history of how Stadia missed the mark with critics and potential buyers, including the service’s lack of transferable game ownership and its lack of a clear à la carte subscription option made popular by video-streaming services like Netflix. The report hints at least one game project that was canceled as part of SG&E’s dissolution earlier this month: “a cross between a Google Assistant and a Tamagotchi pet, allowing players to interact with smart creatures in all sorts of fun ways.” This digital-pet game would have leaned in part on Stadia’s server infrastructure and would have “only worked on a cloud platform,” Schreier says.

Also on Friday, Wired’s Cecilia D’Anastasio published a report citing additional, unnamed sources on the woes of Stadia development. According to that report, Google forbade game developers in the SG&E group from “using certain game development software,” which D’Anastasio likened to “roadblocks on the very fundamentals of game-making.” Additionally, she reports that Stadia’s ambitious goals for internal game studios were hamstrung by serious issues with Google infrastructure:

Google’s famously long and involved hiring process can take six to nine months. And it took time for Google to broaden its hiring standards to accommodate skill sets necessary for game development rather than its traditional fields. The goal was to bring in 2,000 people over five years to work on developing games for Stadia, two sources say.

That “five year” count aligns with previous SG&E Director Jade Raymond’s claim that Stadia needed “four years” to turn around ambitious games, far beyond the less than two years those teams were actually given.

D’Anastasio’s report also backs up Schreier’s allegations about Stadia user counts, claiming that the service “did not meet internal expectations in 2020” and amounted to “unremarkable subscription numbers.” And both reports go into detail about how unique Stadia features, particularly the “State Share” option to jump directly into a mid-game moment, were hyped and advertised well before any game had actually implemented them, thus depressing fan interest.

Savage launch for Savage Planet

This news follows a messy interruption to one of SG&E’s only game launches before its dissolution: a Stadia port of the PC and console game Journey to the Savage Planet. The game was developed by Typhoon Studios, a studio that Google acquired in late 2019 and folded into SG&E, but days after the game’s Stadia version launched as part of the Stadia Pro paid subscription service, SG&E had shut down. In the days that followed, Stadia Pro subscribers began complaining that the game would freeze on its opening “press start” menu, and players had no recourse in terms of changing the game’s save file or toggling other settings.

Questions mounted about who might be able to fix the issue, and one Reddit thread catalogued how Stadia support pointed fingers at the game’s prior publisher, 505 Games. This prompted a 505 representative to tell an affected fan, “Reach out to Stadia support again and inform them that the publisher for that version of JttSP is actually them.”

On Monday, February 22, weeks after the bug was first discovered (and days after the Reddit thread spread far and wide), the game received an update fixing the issue. Stadia representatives declined to answer Ars Technica’s questions about who exactly patched the game or whether the game’s original developers at Typhoon were still employed at Google.

That work to keep the game maintained is a reminder, at the very least, that Stadia continues to operate as a home for third-party games streamed from Google’s servers to players’ homes. Paid $10/mo Stadia Pro subscriptions include access to a library of over two dozen games, while “free” accounts can either buy Stadia game licenses à la carte or access free-to-play software like Destiny 2.

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Netflix drops extended Shadow and Bone teaser, announces release date

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Jessie Mei Li stars as Alina Starkov in Shadow and Bone, a new Netflix fantasy series adapted from Leigh Bardugo’s worldwide bestselling “Grishaverse” novels, premiering April 23.

Netflix unexpectedly dropped an extended teaser trailer for its forthcoming fantasy series Shadow and Bone during a panel at IGN Fan Fest. The hotly anticipated series is adapted from Leigh Bardugo’s bestselling “Grishaverse” novels and will premiere on April 23.

(Mild spoilers for the books below.)

Bardugo published Shadow and Bone, the first of a trilogy, in June 2012, followed by Siege and Storm in 2013 and Ruin and Rising in 2014. She told Entertainment Weekly in 2012 that she deliberately avoided the usual medieval fantasy motifs and drew inspiration instead from the Russian Empire in the early 1800s. “As much as I love broadswords and flagons of ale—and believe me, I do—I wanted to take readers someplace a little different,” she said. “Tsarist Russia gave me a different point of departure.”

Inspiration for the menacing Shadow Fold—the trilogy’s Big Bad—came from her decision to not treat “darkness” metaphorically, but literally. “What if darkness was a place?” she said. “What if the monsters lurking there were real and more horrible than anything you’d ever imagined beneath your bed or behind the closet door? What if you had to fight them on their own territory, blind and helpless in the dark? These ideas eventually became the Shadow Fold.”

In Shadow and Bone, teen orphan Alina Starkov of the Kingdom of Ravka is sent on an expedition across the Unsea (aka the Fold) to bring back provisions for her wealthy patron. Her best friend, Malyen “Mal” Oretsev, is also on the expedition. When monsters inhabiting the Unsea (called volcra) attack, Alina saves the day thanks to previously unsuspected “Grisha” powers—people who can manipulate the elements as weapons. This catches the attention of Grisha leader The Darkling, who brings her to the city of Os Alta, where she begins training with other Grisha to control her powers. But her tutor, Baghra, warns Alina that The Darkling cannot be trusted, and many harrowing adventures ensue.

In 2015, Bardugo published Six of Crows, followed by a sequel, Crooked Kingdom, the following year. The Hollywood Reporter has described the duology as “a blend of Ocean’s 11 and Game of Thrones.” These books are set in the 17th century equivalent of the Dutch Republic. Teenaged Kaz Brekker, aka “Dirthyhands,” is a thief in the city of Ketterdam, who is hired to rescue a scientist from a fortress known as the Ice Court. He recruits members of his street gang, the Dregs, to assist him, given the difficulty of the heist, and once again, many harrowing adventures ensue.

The Netflix adaptation will reportedly cover the events of the Shadow and Bone trilogy and serve as a prequel to the Six of Crows duology. Eric Heisserer (Arrival) heads the project as creator and showrunner, and language expert (“conlanger”) David J. Peterson (Game of Thrones, Doctor Strange, Thor: The Dark World) and Christian Thalmann, who helped Bardugo develop the fictional languages for her Grishaverse novels, will consult on the series. Bardugo herself is an executive producer. Per the official premise:

Shadow and Bone finds us in a war-torn world where lowly soldier and orphan Alina Starkov has just unleashed an extraordinary power that could be the key to setting her country free. With the monstrous threat of the Shadow Fold looming, Alina is torn from everything she knows to train as part of an elite army of magical soldiers known as Grisha. But as she struggles to hone her power, she finds that allies and enemies can be one and the same and that nothing in this lavish world is what it seems. There are dangerous forces at play, including a crew of charismatic criminals, and it will take more than magic to survive.

Jessie Mei Li (Last Night in Soho) stars as Alina Starkov, Ben Barnes (Westworld, The Punisher) plays General Kirigan, aka The Darkling, Archie Renaux (Hanna, The Gold Digger) plays Mal, and Zoe Wanamaker (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone) plays Baghra, Alina’s tutor and mother to The Darkling. There are also several characters from Six of Crows who will appear in this first season: master thief Kaz Brekker (Freddy Carter, Pennyworth); acrobat and knife expert Inej Ghafa (Amita Suman, Doctor WhoThe Outpost); sharpshooter Jesper Fahey (Kit Young, Endeavor), former brothel worker and “Heartrender” Nina Zenik (Danielle Galligan, Game of Thrones), and former witchhunter Matthias Helvar (Calahan Skogman). Two major characters from the Six of Crows duology will not appear in this first season: Nikolai Lantsov and Wylan Van Eck, a merchant’s son and demolitions expert.

Shadow and Bone premieres on Netflix on April 23, 2021.

Listing image by YouTube/Netflix

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Pokémon Legends: Arceus’ stealth-infused open world hits Switch in 2022

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Today’s online Pokémon Presents stream, which celebrated the series’ 25th anniversary, included at least one major surprise: the announcement of a new, more action-oriented Pokémon game set in a period resembling feudal Japan. Pokémon Legends: Arceus is in full development by Game Freak and is targeting an early 2022 release, according to the announcement.

While the new game will be set in the now-familiar Sinnoh region, it will move things back to “a long, long time ago, when the Sinnoh region was still only a vast wilderness.” Players will operate from a base in a feudal-style village, starting out with one of three familiar starter pokémon (Rowlett, Cyndaquil, or Oshawott) to explore that wilderness and fill in the region’s first pokédex.

A short trailer for the game showed a few changes from the series’ usual RPG format. Using a Sword and Shield-style over-the-shoulder camera, players can “study the pokémon’s behaviors, sneak up to them, then throw pokéballs” to catch them directly, as the game’s official description puts it.

The announcement trailer shows the protagonist sneaking through tall grass and around trees to get the jump on unaware pokémon, suggesting stealth will play a large role in the capturing this time around. You’ll also be able to throw pokéballs containing captured monsters directly at wild pokémon, leading to the series’ standard turn-based battles.

Pokémon Legends: Arceus was developed with the desire to deliver an experience infused with new action and RPG elements that go beyond the framework established thus far, while honoring the core gameplay of past Pokémon titles,” The Pokémon Company said in a statement.

Elsewhere in the presentation, The Pokémon Company also announced the widely rumored remakes of the Nintendo DS-era Pokémon Diamond and Pearl for the Switch. Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl are expected to launch in late 2021 and are being developed by Ilca Inc., best known for Pokémon Home.

The Pokémon Company also showed off some new footage of the previously announced New Pokémon Snap, slated for a Switch release on April 30. Players will be able to crop and edit photos taken in the game with stickers and frames and then share them with other players online, earning points based on their photos’ popularity. Players will also be able to throw fruit and glowing “lumina orbs” to help get monster shots that will receive a better rating from the game’s algorithm.

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