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Huawei Australia sees large profit and revenue growth while skirting ban impact

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Huawei ban sees TPG end rollout of Australian mobile network
Australian telco says the lack of a clear upgrade path to 5G will see it end its network rollout.

Huawei Australia experienced an 18% spike in revenue over the course of 2018, as the Australian arm of the Chinese giant collected receipts of AU$735 million compared to AU$623 million in the year prior.

Broken down by revenue type, the company saw revenue growth across the board: It increased goods sales by 19% to AU$417 million, revenue from services jumped 22% to AU$154 million, with construction payments growing by 12% to AU$164 million.

With the cost of sales increasing by 21% to AU$597 million, Huawei Australia had pre-tax profit of AU$38.7 million against AU$32 million in 2017. For the year to December 31, 2018, the company paid AU$9.3 million in income tax, whereas it paid AU$16.3 million for 2017, which led to the company posting an 89% jump in post-tax profit to AU$29.3 million.

The amount spent by the company on wages in 2018 fell from AU$49.4 million to AU$47.5 million, as it reported having 343 employees. For research and development, expenditure was steady at AU$4.7 million, however the amount of tax incentives gained dropped from AU$0.51 million to AU$0.13 million.

During 2018, the Chinese giant found itself banned from 5G rollouts in Australia, which resulted in TPG announcing it would cease the building out of its mobile network.

Despite this, the company optimistically claimed the ban “may reduce the scale and growth in the carrier network business”.

“The company will continue to pursue its objective of increasing its profitability and market share during the next financial year, with a particular focus on the enterprise and consumer business,” Huawei Australia said in its filing to ASIC.

Huawei is having better luck in the United Kingdom than Australia, where it has been allowed to deploy 5G equipment despite a report pointing out significant flaws in its equipment.

Last week, the Chinese parent company announced first quarter earnings that saw revenue jump by 39% to 180 billion yuan as it sold 59 million smartphones.

The company has previously said it wanted to be the biggest smartphone brand overall by 2020.

Huawei Australia made its filing with ASIC with an air of defiance, stating it does not believe it is a reporting entity.

“The company is not publicly accountable,” the filing said.

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Samsung and Huawei are the first big tech companies to jump on the folding smartphone bandwagon, so what’s different between the Galaxy Fold and the Mate X?

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How To Build Your Own Retro Gaming Console With A Raspberry Pi

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Once your micro SD card is mounted with RetroPie, you can plug it into your fully assembled Raspberry Pi 4 and begin the setup process in the software menu that appears. Make sure your controller is nearby, as you’ll need it during the first boot process. If you’re using a USB controller, make sure it’s connected physically, then follow the instructions on-screen.

If you’re using a Bluetooth controller, tap F4 on your USB keyboard to exit back into the Linux command prompt screen, then type and execute the command “sudo ~/RetroPie-S etup/retropie-setup.sh” that loads you into a backend RetroPie menu. Navigate to the Bluetooth option and then open it to begin searching for a controller. Set your Bluetooth controller to sync mode, then pair it in the menu. Return to the Linux command prompt and type the command “sudo shutdown -r now”. Upon loading back into RetroPie, you should be able to use your Bluetooth controller by simply turning it on and following the on-screen menu. Once everything is complete, you’ll end up on another menu with the option RASPI-CONFIG, which you should now select.

Upon tapping that option, you’ll be taken to the main configuration menu for RetroPie, which includes all sorts of different settings. Go ahead and configure whichever settings you need. It’s also a good idea to navigate to Advanced Settings and disable Overscan if you’re using an HDTV. From here, you should be able to load your ROMs (stored on your SD card) and play them from the menu that appears when you boot up RetroPie. Check out the RetroPie documentation for troubleshooting any issues you may encounter, and happy gaming!

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Today’s Wordle Answer #377 – July 1, 2022 Word Solution And Hints

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The solution for the July 1, 2022, edition of Wordle is pinto. It made its way to the English vocabulary from the Spanish word pinto, which refers to a subject that is spotted or mottled. Horses with a patchy coloration, especially those rocking white patches, are affectionately known as pinto.

The word traces its etymological roots to the Latin term pinctus, which is used to describe something that has been painted over. The pinto bean, which is a staple in Mexican, Spanish, and Brazilian cuisines, also gets its name from the patchy color profile of its outer skin. According to Ancestry data, Pinto is a popular Catalan name that eventually made its way to the Indian subcontinent with the advent of Portuguese invaders.

Interestingly, it is also used to describe a person with greying hair, something pop culture describes as a salt-and-pepper look. You can trace the history of Pinto family migration across the U.S. and Canada in the 19th century here. As for famous personalities with that surname, the actress described above is Freida Pinto, while the footballer in question is José Manuel Pinto. Meanwhile, Fernão Mendes Pinto was a renowned Portuguese explorer and writer who also has a crater on the planet Mercury named after him.

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This New $6 Raspberry Pi Is The Computer The DIY Smart Home Needs

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In terms of hardware, the Raspberry Pi Pico W is identical to its predecessor; it sports the same RP2040 Arm Cortex M0+ Dual-Core SoC, which is based on TSMC’s 40nm low power manufacturing process. This chip clocks up to 133MHz and also packs in 264KB of SRAM. There is 2MB of onboard flash storage thrown in, as well. Additionally, the machine features a 40-pin GPIO just like the original Pico from 2021. The onboard micro USB controller can be used for data transfer and receiving power.

The Wi-Fi module on the Raspberry Pi Pico is the Infineon CYW43439 wireless that, apart from supporting 2.4GHz Wi-Fi networks, also adds Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low-Energy support. However, as of now, Raspberry has chosen not to enable Bluetooth capability in the machine. The company does not rule out the possibility of enabling Bluetooth further down the line, though.

With over 2 million Raspberry Pi Pico boards in the hands of consumers, the company expects its new model to enjoy similar success. The company also believes that the ongoing chip shortage has been among the prime reasons for the popularity of the RP2040-based Raspberry Pi Pico. The Pico W, thanks to its newfound wireless capability, will continue to be a great product that can power many IoT-based applications and DIY smart home needs. With a price tag of $6, the Raspberry Pi Pico W costs just $2 more than its predecessor. As the ecosystem for starter microcontrollers evolves, the $6 you spend on the Pico W will definitely be a worthwhile investment.

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