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Huawei security: ‘Significant’ engineering flaws pose risk to networks, says UK

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Huawei warns bans will increase prices and put US behind in 5G race
Huawei says that restricting competition will increase prices and delay the implementation of 5G, putting the US behind rival countries.

The board that oversees the security of Huawei equipment used in UK telecoms networks has said that technical issues with the Chinese company’s engineering processes have lead to new risks.

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“Further significant technical issues have been identified in Huawei’s engineering processes, leading to new risks in the UK telecommunications networks,” said the annual report from the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC) Oversight Board. The board oversees the unit that evaluates the security of the Chinese company’s products used in UK telecoms network.

The report warned: “Overall, the Oversight Board can only provide limited assurance that all risks to UK national security from Huawei’s involvement in the UK’s critical networks can be sufficiently mitigated long-term.”

The report also said that “no material progress” has been made by Huawei in the remediation of the issues reported last year. As a result, it said this made it inappropriate to change the level of assurance from last year “or to make any comment on potential future levels of assurance”.

In 2018, HCSEC said its work had continued to identify “concerning issues” in Huawei’s approach to software development, bringing significantly increased risk to UK operators, which required ongoing management and mitigation.

SEE: IT pro’s guide to the evolution and impact of 5G technology (free PDF)

The report said: “The Oversight Board continues to be able to provide only limited assurance that the long-term security risks can be managed in the Huawei equipment currently deployed in the UK,” and warned that it would be difficult to appropriately risk-manage future products in the context of UK deployments, until the “underlying defects in Huawei’s software engineering and cyber-security processes are remediated”.

Huawei acknowleged in a statement that the report details concerns about Huawei’s software engineering capabilities. “We understand these concerns and take them very seriously,” it said and added that the company was spending $2bn to improve its software-engineering capabilities.

However, the HCSEC board report noted: “At present, the Oversight Board has not yet seen anything to give it confidence in Huawei’s capacity to successfully complete the elements of its transformation programme that it has proposed as a means of addressing these underlying defects. The Board will require sustained evidence of better software engineering and cyber security quality.”

A spokesman for the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre said “We can and have been managing the security risk and have set out the improvements we expect the company to make. We will not compromise on the progress we need to see: sustained evidence of better software engineering and cybersecurity, verified by HCSEC. This report illustrates above all the need for improved cybersecurity in the UK telco networks which is being addressed more widely by the Digital Secretary’s review.”

SEE: Cybersecurity in an IoT and mobile world (ZDNet special report) | Download the report as a PDF (TechRepublic)

In the background is the ongoing row about about Huawei and 5G, the next generation of mobile technology.

The US banned the Chinese networking giant from government contracts back in 2014 has continued to raise concerns about the use of equipment from Huawei in 5G networks, worried that it could create a backdoor to be used by the Chinese state for spying.

While the company has strenuously denied that this is possible (and pointed to a history of spying by the US), the US has been lobbying other states to dump Huawei kit from forthcoming 5G networks, with mixed results.

The UK is currently carrying out a review of 5G security but the country’s tech security agency has already said that it can manage the risks of using Huawei equipment, and that having a broad set of suppliers to be able to spread risk is also essential to security. 

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The 12 Cheapest Productions Cars Ever Made

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Nobody said that a cheap car must be a terrible one, and the Volkswagen Type 1 Beetle is proof. Created before WWII and put into production under British management after the war, the VW Beetle went on to be one of the best-selling cars of all time, according to Autoweek. They are basic, small, and austere, but dependable, capable, and enjoyable cars to many.

The genesis of the car was in the idea of producing a “people’s car” for the German public, something the average German could afford to buy and use on the newly laid Autobahn highways. With plans interrupted by the war, German industry had been decimated and also needed economic activity to rebuild. Volkswagen commenced production to get its people behind the wheel, but also exported the cars to increase much-needed trade, and it became a success (via Hemmings).

In developed markets where the VW sold, it was often the cheapest car available. Thanks to its simple design and robust engine, people took millions of them home, even creating subcultures of fanatical drivers, and it continued to be made in 2003 in Mexico.

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Elon Musk Made This Video Game When He Was 12 Years Old. Here’s How You Can Play It

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In 1995, Musk was on his second day at Stanford University when he and his brother abruptly dropped out, dove into Silicon Valley’s emerging Internet boom, and started Zip2. This company provided city travel guide information to prominent online newspapers. Four years later, Compaq Computer Corporation bought that company for $307 million in cold hard cash and another $34 million worth of stock options (via Biography).

He immediately took that money and co-founded the online bank X.com, which later consolidated with Confinity to become PayPal (via Business Insider). In 2002, eBay bought PayPal for $1.5 billion. Musk pocketed around $175 million from that venture, turned around, and created SpaceX. See the pattern?

Musk was born in Pretoria, South Africa, in 1971. When he was young, his parents feared that he had a hearing problem (via Biography), but it wasn’t that he was intentionally ignoring them. Instead, he was getting so utterly wrapped up and focused on his own thoughts that he wasn’t aware they were calling out to him. He was later diagnosed with the autism spectrum disorder known as Asperger’s syndrome. Symptoms include not responding to their name and obsessive interest in certain subjects, both of which were present in Musk.

In 1979, when Elon was around eight years old, his parents divorced. He and his siblings went to live with his mother because, according to Musk, his father was a “terrible human being.” However, he also calls his dad a “brilliant engineer,” and believes he got his computer and engineering skills from him.

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The Best Cyber Monday Laptop Deals 2022

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The ASUS TUF Gaming F15 laptop was awarded as one of our preferred affordable gaming laptops of 2022, and Cyber Monday deals from Best Buy slash the price even further. Through the online retailer, this ASUS model falls from $1,079.99 to $699.99. Something about the removal of the comma makes anything seem like a much more reasonable investment! Another ASUS deal at Best Buy brings us the ROG Zephyrus 144Hz 14-inch gaming laptop with 16 gigabytes of RAM and an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 graphics chip for $500 off — that’s $899.99 rather than $1,399.99.

Directly through Lenovo, there are a few some impressive laptop deals. You can save a whopping $2,010.00 on the ThinkPad T14s Gen 2 14-inch in storm gray color for a grand total of $849. There’s over $2,200 to be saved on the same model,  but in black. Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 Yoga Gen 6 14-inch is 65% off — that pitches the price by $2,350.00 to $1,259.00.

Target’s only Cyber Monday specific deal is for the HP Victus 15.6-inch 144Hz gaming laptop, which was originally listed for $829.99 but has fallen to $589.99. That’s another gaming laptop that earned a spot on our best affordable gaming laptop rank. However, there are a number of unspecified sales and clearance deals that slash laptop prices by as much as $500 at Target, such as the Acer Aspire 3 15.6-inch laptop with 8 gigabytes of RAM for $249.99. 

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