Connect with us

Cars

Huawei to sue US government to overturn its ban as unconstitutional

Published

on

Huawei warns bans will increase prices and put US behind in 5G race
Huawei says that restricting competition will increase prices and delay the implementation of 5G, putting the US behind rival countries.

Huawei has filed a suit against the government of the United States as it seeks to overturn its ban through the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Filed in the US Federal Court, Huawei rotating chair Guo Ping said in Shenzhen on Thursday that the company is seeking a declaratory judgment that the NDAA restrictions were unconstitutional, as well as a permanent injunction against the restrictions.

“The US government has long branded Huawei a threat. It has hacked our servers and stolen our emails and source code,” Guo Ping said. “Despite this, the US government has never provided any evidence supporting their accusations that Huawei poses a cybersecurity threat.

“Still, the US government is sparing no effort to smear the company and mislead the public about Huawei. Even worse, the US government is trying to block us from the 5G markets in other countries.”

In his speech, the Huawei chair alluded to a tweet from US President Trump that called on US companies to develop 6G, and “win through competition, not by blocking out” more advanced competition.

“Other countries are rightly resisting the US government’s campaign against Huawei, and the US president himself has recently questioned using artificial security reasons to block Huawei,” Guo Ping said.

“We are compelled to take this legal action as a proper and last resort. We look forward to the court’s verdict, and trust that it will benefit both Huawei and the American people.”

The complaint filed by Huawei claims that section 889 of the NDAA not only bars all US government agencies from doing business with Huawei, but also bars third parties that use Huawei equipment.

Read: Bipartisan Bill introduced to ban sale of US tech to Huawei and ZTE

“This violates the Bill of Attainder Clause and the Due Process Clause. It also violates the separation of powers principles enshrined in the US Constitution, because Congress is both making the law, and attempting to adjudicate and execute it,” the company said in a statement.

Huawei chief legal officer Song Liuping said the ban was unconstitutional by singling out the company by name, and was a “purposeful and punitive” attack.

“Huawei has never had a fair chance to confront or cross-examine its accusers. Nor has it been allowed an impartial adjudicator,” Song said.

“The U.S. Congress has simply acted as law-maker, prosecutor, and jury at the same time, contrary to the American Constitution.”

Song added the company was, along with the government, suing agency secretaries bound by section 889, including the Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and Acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt. 

Huawei also repeated claims that it has never installed backdoors, and that no evidence against it has ever been produced. 

In a speech delivered earlier this week in London, former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull addressed his nation’s ban on Huawei and ZTE.

Turnbull said the ban instituted in August was not done at the behest of another nation or for protectionist reasons, but because it defended Australia’s sovereignty and as a “hedge against changing times”.

“It is important to remember that a threat is the combination of capability and intent,” he said.

“Capability can take years, decades to develop. And in many cases won’t be attainable at all. But intent can change in a heartbeat.”

Huawei is currently facing a 10-count indictment alleging the company conspired to steal intellectual property from T-Mobile and subsequently obstructed justice, in addition to separate 13-count indictment against the company and its CFO Meng Wanzhou.

Also: Huawei ban sees TPG end rollout of Australian mobile network

“The company denies that it or its subsidiary or affiliate have committed any of the asserted violations of US law set forth in each of the indictments, is not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms Meng, and believes the US courts will ultimately reach the same conclusion,” Huawei said in January.

The US Department of Justice is alleging that Huawei offered bonuses to employees for stealing information, before clarifying to its US employees that such behaviour would be illegal.

“The charges unsealed today clearly allege that Huawei intentionally conspired to steal the intellectual property of an American company in an attempt to undermine the free and fair global marketplace,” FBI Director Christopher Wray said at the time.

“To the detriment of American ingenuity, Huawei continually disregarded the laws of the United States in the hopes of gaining an unfair economic advantage. As the volume of these charges prove, the FBI will not tolerate corrupt businesses that violate the laws that allow American companies and the United States to thrive.”

The United States is alleging that Huawei stole information on a T-Mobile phone-testing robot called Tappy in order to build its own, which included photographing and measuring Tappy, as well as physically stealing a part from it.

“After T-Mobile discovered and interrupted these criminal activities, and then threatened to sue, Huawei produced a report falsely claiming that the theft was the work of rogue actors within the company and not a concerted effort by Huawei corporate entities in the United States and China,” the Department of Justice said.

“As emails obtained in the course of the investigation reveal, the conspiracy to steal secrets from T-Mobile was a company-wide effort involving many engineers and employees within the two charged companies [Huawei and Huawei USA].”

See: Huawei CFO sues Canadian government, police, border force

The indictment involving Meng Wanzhou relates to the relationship between Huawei and its Iranian-affliate Skycom.

“Huawei employees allegedly told banking partners that Huawei had sold its ownership in Skycom, but these claims were false,” United States acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said in January.

“In reality, Huawei had sold Skycom to itself.”

Whitaker alleged the company used the false sale to claim it was in compliance with US sanctions on Iran, and hence banks working with the company also violated the sanctions. The acting Attorney-General also alleges Huawei lied to the US government and attempted to obstruct justice by concealing and destroying evidence, and moving potential government witnesses back to China.

On Wednesday, the Vancouver Sun reported the Huawei CFO’s extradition case has been deferred until May 8, where a date for the extradition hearing could be set.

Meng was arrested on December 1 in Vancouver.

Updated at 15:18pm AEDT, March 7, 2019: additional comments added. 

Related Coverage

China charges two detained Canadians for spying and stealing state secrets

Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau, in response to the charges, has said he is ‘very concerned with this position that China has taken’.

Huawei CFO sues Canadian government, police, border force

The lawsuit alleges that the global Huawei CFO was detained and interrogated by airport customs, and her electronic devices searched, before informing her that she was under arrest.

Huawei pleads not guilty to stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile

A trial has been set for March 2, 2020.

MWC 2019: Huawei builds 5G network across Korea with LG Uplus

LG Uplus has deployed more than 10,000 5G sites across Korea using Huawei technology, providing average mobile speeds of 900Mbps in Seoul.

President Trump: ‘I want 6G in US as soon as possible’

Meanwhile Huawei CEO calls Trump a “great president” as Trump weighs a ban on its 5G tech in mobile networks.

Huawei has big plans for new Singapore cloud region

Chinese tech giant launches new cloud region in Singapore, where it says it is looking to develop into one of its largest outside China and will deliver artificial intelligence capabilities.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cars

Callaway Chevy Silverado SC602 Signature Edition trounces Ram TRX in a drag race

Published

on

American performance vehicle builder Callaway Cars has debuted its newest creation: The Chevy Silverado SC602 Signature Edition, now officially the best sleeper truck on the road. How fast? Hold your breath: This Chevy Silverado has trounced the mighty RAM TRX in a drag race. That’s saying a lot since Ram made it clear the TRX is “the quickest, fastest, and most powerful mass-produced truck in the world.”

But as it turns out, Callaway has other plans. The company has a long and cherished history of building quirky yet high-end performance cars like the C4 Corvette Sledgehammer and C7 Corvette AeroWagen. However, what we really love about the Silverado SC602 is the way it looks.

It may resemble a factory-stock Chevy Silverado from some angles, but there are telltale signs of the truck’s outstanding stoplight-to-stoplight ability. Like those 20 or 22-inch Callaway lightweight wheels, for instance, or the bevy of chrome Callaway exterior badging, including a bold CALLAWAY script on the carbon fiber front grille.

As with any Callaway vehicle, what matters most is hiding under the sheet metal. The SC602 starts life as a Chevrolet Silverado Trail Boss, RST, LTZ, or High Country with a standard 6.2-liter V8 motor and four-wheel drive. Next, Callway installs a GenThree Eaton TVS R2650 Supercharger with a TripleCooled intercooler. The blower offers 15-percent more displacement yet requiring 18-percent less power output.

It doesn’t stop there. The truck also gets a high-flow intake, low-restriction stainless steel dual outlet exhausts with quad exhaust tips, and a bespoke Callaway ECU with custom tuning. After all the dirty engine work is complete, the Callaway Silverado SC60’s blown V8 is now pumping out 602 horsepower and 560 pound-feet of torque.

But wait, the Ram TRX’s Hellcat V8 makes 702 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque, 100 more horses (and 90 more torques) than Callaway’s truck, so how did it trounce the Ram? Two words: weight and tires. The Silverado SC602 tips the scales at only 5,820 pounds (2640 kg), while the Ram TRX weighs around 7,080 (3,211 kg) pounds.

The result is nothing short of astonishing. The SC602 goes from zero to 60 mph in 4.3-seconds, zero to 100 mph in 9.80-seconds, and breaks the quarter-mile in 12.5-seconds @ 113 mph. Meanwhile, the Ram TRX goes from zero to 60 mph in 3.99-seconds, a bit quicker than the Chevy.

But the latter is faster from zero to 100 mph as the Ram needed 10.14 seconds to perform the deed, proof of the Callaway Silverado SC60’s mid to high-range pulling power. And yeah, those sticky performance tires were partly responsible for the Callaway’s drag strip prowess.

What’s more, the Silverado SC602 is 50-state emissions compliant and carries a 3-year/36,000-mile warranty to supplement Chevy’s bumper-to-bumper warranty. Other goodies include aluminum door sills, billet aluminum pedals, an Alcantara-covered horn cover, and ID plaques to let other people know you’re driving the genuine article.

How much? We have no idea. But you can get in touch with Callaway if you fancy the ultimate Ram-beating sleeper truck.

Callaway Chevy Silverado SC602 Signature Edition Gallery

Continue Reading

Cars

Ford reveals the custom 2021 Mustang Mach-E to be given away for charity

Published

on

Ford has supported various charities for a long time, often donating customized automobiles to be auctioned off. Each year Ford offers a customized car for the AirVenture charity, and typically that car is a Ford Mustang of some sort with a big V8 engine under the hood. This year, the car Ford is donating to the charity is a different kind of Mustang.

Ford has revealed the customized electric 2021 Mustang Mach-E that will be auctioned off this year. The vehicle was built to honor the sacrifices of Women Air Force Service Pilots. The special Mach-E is inspired by the female volunteer pilots and the planes they flew during World War II.

Proceeds from the vehicle auction support the EAA initiative to provide young women and underserved youths more access to careers in the aviation industry. Ford notes that it has worked with AirVenture for more than two decades and has donated 12 custom aviation-themed performance vehicles so far, raising a total of more than $4 million. 2021 marks the first year Ford has donated an electric vehicle.

The custom Mach-E was designed by Ford and has a custom paint scheme with military badging inspired by the warplanes the volunteers flew. Women Air Force Service Pilots flew almost every type of military aircraft in World War II as they rolled off the factory floor after assembly. Ford put badges, including the US Army Air Force star on both sides, wings logos on the hood and fender, and No. 38 on the front fascia, rear bumper, and inside the cabin.

That number represents the 38 volunteers who died serving their country. Women Air Force Service Pilots are a group of American volunteers who transported warplanes to US Army bases worldwide to be used in combat. The female pilots flew more than 60 million miles during the war and weren’t recognized as active military personnel until 1977 when the pilots were granted retroactive military status.

Continue Reading

Cars

This Porsche 911 Turbo S pays homage to Mexican driving ace Pedro Rodriguez

Published

on

In collaboration with Porsche Latin America, Porsche Mexico, and Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur, German automaker Porsche has built a custom 911 Turbo S in memory of the late, great Pedro Rodriguez. Rodriguez is the most successful Mexican racing driver of all time.

He walked away with 11 titles in the World Championship of Makes – now known as the World Endurance Championship – and helped Porsche capture the crown in 1970 and 1971 aboard a Porsche 917 KH in Gulf Oil livery. Rodriguez claimed two Formula Grand Prix wins, four wins in the 24 Hours of Daytona, and a victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans before losing his life in 1971 at the Norising street circuit in Nuremberg, Germany.

Fifty years on after that fateful and deadly crash, Porsche is reliving the glory days with a custom 911 Turbo S ‘One of a Kind’ Pedro Rodriguez. The car debuted at a Sportscar Together Day event at the Centro Alto Rendimineto in Toluca, Mexico, where it drew oohs and ahhs with its custom Gulf attire.

Porsche claims the 911 Turbo S ‘One of a Kind’ Pedro Rodriguez is, well, genuinely one of a kind. “This configuration, with these specific details and equipment, has been locked in the Porsche configurator, as well as in the production system, so that this car is literally unrepeatable,” said Camilo San Martin, Director of Porsche Mexico.

Wearing the iconic Gulf Blue paint with single orange striping, it also has custom high-gloss black wheels, an aluminum center lock, and a black number 2 in a white circle graphic on the doors and front hood. Look closely at the B-pillar and you’ll find a silhouette of the 917 KH race car wearing the colors off the Mexican flag, complete with the name and signature of Pedro Rodriguez.

Other bespoke elements include unique carbon moldings on the lower door frames (which illuminate when the doors are open), Graphite Blue leather seats with orange stitching, and an engraved tribute of the eight races that Rodriguez won aboard the Porsche 917 KH under the rear spoiler.

Also included are a Gulf Blue key fob (with Rodriguez’s signature) and a luggage set wearing the same blue and orange colors. It still has a turbocharged 3.8-liter flat-six pumping out 640 horsepower and 590 pound-feet of torque with an eight-speed dual-clutch gearbox under the hood.

The Porsche 911 Turbo S Pedro Rodriguez will hit the auction block later this year. Porsche will donate the auction proceeds to various charities.

Continue Reading

Trending