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Huawei will not be beaten to death despite $30b hit: Ren Zhengfei

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Huawei ban: Winners, losers, and what’s at stake (a whole lot)
ZDNet’s Jason Cipriani and Jason Perlow talk with Karen Roby about how the security and trade brouhaha impacts everything from the future of regional carriers and the bottom lines of tech giants to 5G’s prospects and consumer’s pocketbooks. Read more: https://zd.net/2WzVRbq

After finishing with revenues over $100 billion — 721 billion yuan — for 2018, Huawei is expecting to drop $30 billion of revenue from its forecast due to the trade war with the United States.

“In the next two years, I think we will reduce our capacity, our revenue will be down by about $30 billion compared to forecasts,” Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei said in Shenzhen on Monday.

“Our sales revenue this year and next will be about $100 billion.”

Ren said over the next two years, the Chinese giant would look to switch out some of its technical foundations, which could hit US component makers, after which the company would become stronger.

“We are strong, I think there is no way we will be beaten to death,” he said.

Ren also confirmed that Huawei’s international smartphone shipments had dropped by 40%, but said Chinese growth is “very fast”.

On the recent sale of its subsea cable business, Ren said the decision was a not a swift one.

“We were quite successful in that business,” he said. “It’s not because we were attacked and the business went badly, and sold it.”

“We thought that’s not part of our core business that’s why we decided to sell it, and for the other businesses we will not have spin-off or sale — we might shrink our size.”

Ren claims historic IP thefts not possible

The Huawei founder brushed aside accusations of intellectual property theft by the company, saying the company has always behaved itself.

“Even if we were small, we have very strong business ethics and integrity, otherwise we cannot come to where we are today,” Ren said.

“The claims of Huawei theft of IPR, that’s not possible.”

Ren’s statement will likely draw raised eyebrows in Cisco headquarters, which sued the Chinese giant for infringing on its patents and copying its source code in 2003.

Almost a decade later, Cisco called Huawei out for stating the suit was unjustified, and challenged Huawei to release an expert report from the time of the incident.

“In fact, within a few months of filing suit, Cisco obtained a worldwide injunction against sale by Huawei of products, including our code for a Cisco-proprietary routing protocol called EIGRP, and Huawei publicly admitted that the code had been used in their products and they pledged to stop,” Cisco’s senior vice president, general counsel, and secretary Mark Chandler said at the time.

Huawei is currently facing charges in the US for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The alleged activity occurred during 2012-13, and relates to Huawei’s attempts to build a robot similar to the one T-Mobile was using at the time to test mobile phones.

The US indictment related to the case alleges Huawei offered bonuses to employees for stealing information, before needing to clarifying for its US employees that such behaviour would be illegal.

“The charges unsealed today clearly allege that Huawei intentionally conspired to steal the intellectual property of an American company in an attempt to undermine the free and fair global marketplace,” FBI Director Christopher Wray said in January.

The Chinese giant has pleaded not guilty.

Speaking on Monday, Ren said although Huawei has a large number of patents, it has not been aggressive in seeking royalties from other companies.

“Over the past eight years, we were not aggressive seeking IPR royalties to companies that use our IPR, that’s because we were busy pursuing our business growth,” he said.

“We may try to get some money from those companies who use our IPR, but we will not be as aggressive as Qualcomm.”

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This Brand Makes The Worst Android Phones, According To 27% Of People We Polled

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Most respondents who participated in our poll seem to earnestly believe that Xiaomi makes the worst Android phones out there. More than 27% of the polled users think Xiaomi deserves this particular crown. On the face of it, the poll results seem grossly unfair towards Xiaomi, given that the company doesn’t even sell its phones to U.S. consumers. There is no denying, however, that Xiaomi needs to do a lot to change its brand perception in the U.S. if they ever plan on releasing smartphones in North America (again, that is).

With more than 21% of the votes, a virtually unknown smartphone brand for U.S. consumers comes in second place. The brand in question here is Realme — a sub-brand owned by OPPO. Realme is a very popular smartphone brand in Asia and is known mainly for its value-for-money devices that usually compete against similarly priced alternatives from Xiaomi.

Another smartphone brand that is in desperate need of a brand overhaul is Google. More than 18% of polled people thought Google makes the worst Android phones. That’s a lot of brickbats for a company behind the software that powers Android phones. The less favorable opinion seems to stem from a long list of issues that troubled the Google Pixel lineup.

Samsung and OnePlus find themselves in the last two places on this list with 17.23% and 15.54% of the votes, respectively. It could be that the other brands are simply less popular in the minds of U.S. citizens, or it could be that Samsung and OnePlus really and truly make the best Android phones — what do you think?

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Lincoln Model L100 Concept Is Hyper-Luxury Electrification With Wild Doors And A Disco Floor

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Certainly, the exterior of the Model L100 Concept is memorable. Lincoln describes it as “the tension between exuberant elegance and subtle restraint,” and it’s clear that aerodynamics have played a big role in deciding the overall silhouette. We’ve seen how that chase for slipperiness through the air can lead to electric cars looking like relatively amorphous blobs, though that’s something Lincoln manages to avoid.

Instead, it plays with light, glass, and scale. The Model L100 Concept hunkers low to the ground, with a glass panoramic roof and reverse-hinged doors to add drama as well as make entering and exiting more straightforward. Sensors track the owner’s approach, meanwhile, with the promise of a curated light show both outside and inside. Then, the doors — which extend all the way back to the rear bumper — gape outward, while the entire glass roof section lifts up.

The concept is finished with a satin digital ceramic tricot metallic paint, shifting between cool blue and soft white. Instead of the traditional chrome, frosted acrylic has been used as a more sustainable alternative. The whole floor of the cabin, meanwhile, is one big digital panel capable of showing shifting graphics, colors, and patterns. 

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Here’s How Drones Could Change The Medical Industry

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UKRI’s program also has major implications for the medical industry in particular, both in terms of its future sustainability as well as efficiency. University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) Director Phil Woodford told BBC the Future Flight Challenge could help reduce traffic, pollution, and transport sensitive medical supplies, all at the same time. The project’s first phase will start with drones traveling between the Royal Lancaster Infirmary, Wesmorland, and Furness General Hospitals in Cumbria, using a dedicated 250ft airspace. Based on routes in Google Maps, the average driving distance of such trips more or less range from 20 to 40 miles.

The thing is, current means of delivering medical samples in Lancashire involves traveling to different hospitals several times a day using vans, taxis and motorcycles. Compared to such rudimentary means of travel, which Woodford said takes an hour or more depending on traffic, using medical drones are said to shorten the overall trip to just 15 minutes. Woodford argued that medical drone deliveries can make the process faster, safer, and doesn’t put unnecessary load on drivers and the environment. While drones have proven to be quite handy in space, properly integrating them on Earth’s busier air space is another story. Fortunately, the project is building a roadmap to tackle just that.

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