Connect with us

Tech News

IMAX pulls the plug on its dream of VR arcades – TechCrunch

Published

on

2 hours ago
Tech News

2 Views

The company behind the biggest screens in cinema is giving up on bringing VR screens within a few inches of users’ faces. The company announced today in a SEC filing that it will be shutting down its three remaining virtual reality centers including its flagship location in Los Angeles.

Via the filing:

In connection with the Company’s previously-announced strategic review of its virtual reality pilot initiative, the Company has decided to close its remaining VR locations and write-off certain VR content investments.

The locations in LA, Bangkok and Toronto will be shuttered in Q1 of 2019 according to Variety.

After making a lot of noise about the centers at launch, the company seemed to realize pretty quickly that the economics just weren’t there. Previous to today’s announcement, IMAX had already shut down 4 of the 7 VR centers that had been opened.

A lot of virtual reality startups who were counting on the pipe dream resurgence of the American arcade scene are probably sweating a bit after today’s news. It was clear that IMAX’s efforts hadn’t been a raving success, but there’s a big difference between dialing it back and shutting it down.

Earlier this year, IMAX confirmed that it had paused work on a VR camera project it was developing with Google.

Source link


Check Also



A mindful, contemplative approach to internalized racism and sexism is a necessary piece of the …

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tech News

The 12 Fastest Ways To Travel On Land

Published

on

The L0 Series Maglev train is a high-speed magnetic levitation (maglev) train developed by Central Japan Railway Company (JR Central) in Japan. The train, also known as the “Linimo,” is the world’s first commercial maglev train to enter revenue service. The train was first introduced in 2011 and currently operates in the city of Nagoya (via Tanken Japan).

The L0 Series trains are powered by superconducting magnets, which lift the train off the tracks and propel it forward. This technology allows the train to reach speeds of up to 374 mph (601 km/h) without the need for wheels, gears, or friction. This results in a smoother and faster ride compared to traditional trains.

On April 16th, a manned seven-car L0 series trainset reached a speed of 590 km/h (370 mph) breaking the previous world record of 581 km/h (361 mph) set by a Japanese MLX01 maglev trainset in December 2003. The speed of 590 km/h was sustained for 19 seconds. Just five days later, on April 21st, a manned seven-car L0 series trainset recorded a top speed of 603 km/h (375 mph). The train hit its top speed at 10:48 am, about 4 minutes into the run, with 49 JR Central employees on board. The train sustained the speed for 10.8 seconds, traveling 1.8 kilometers (1.1 mi) during that time.

One of the unique features of the L0 Series is its ability to operate on both elevated and ground-level tracks. This is made possible by its ability to switch between levitation and contact modes. The train also has a smaller environmental footprint than traditional trains as it emits less noise and vibration.

In addition to its use in Nagoya, JR Central has plans to introduce the L0 Series on the Tokyo-Osaka route. This will reduce travel time between the two cities from 2 hours and 25 minutes to just 1 hour and 7 minutes.

Overall, the L0 Series Maglev train is a technological marvel that showcases Japan’s leadership in high-speed rail technology. It offers a faster, smoother, and more efficient mode of transportation for passengers, and also has a lower environmental impact than traditional trains. With plans to expand its usage to other routes, the L0 Series is set to revolutionize the way we travel in Japan and potentially the world.

Continue Reading

Tech News

The Dodge M80 Was A Throwback Truck Concept Ahead Of Its Time

Published

on

If Fisher-Price made combat vehicles in World War II, it might look like the Dodge M80 concept. The M80 was a retro-inspired vehicle in the same way that the PT Cruiser and Plymouth Prowler harkened back to the old days of motoring. Although unlike the PT Cruiser and the poor Prowler, the M80 didn’t make anyone who looked at it think cars in general were a bad idea. 

As reported by Canadian Driver in 2002, the Dodge M80’s exterior was entirely new, but it had familiar bones as it was based on the Dodge Dakota and was powered by a 3.7-liter 210-horsepower V6. With an estimated weight of just 2,500 pounds, it would have been a featherweight next to other trucks at the time. For comparison, a Ford Ranger from the same year had a curb weight of 3,085 pounds (via Edmunds). Where the M80 really shined was its proposed simplicity and capability. The interior was spartan and therefore easy to clean. Pictures of the concept show compartments galore, including a rear window that allowed either access to the bed while in the truck or effectively lengthened the truck bed. GMC is currently putting a similar feature to use in the EV version of the Sierra.

The Dodge M80 unfortunately never came to pass. As such, it was not able to breath life into the floundering compact truck market at the beginning of the new Millenium. Fortunately, the future is bright for small trucks with the introduction of the Ford Maverick and Hyundai Santa Cruz. 

Continue Reading

Tech News

Why You Need To Use Google Chrome’s Enhanced Safe Browsing Mode

Published

on

First, the basics. Activating Enhanced Safe Browsing in Chrome is a simple process: just click Settings, scroll to Privacy And Security > Safe Browsing, and select the Enhanced option. The importance of Enhanced Safe Browsing is a somewhat longer story. In short, no security is foolproof, and Google has historically erred on the side of making simple, accessible tools for consumers. Incognito Mode in particular is allegedly considered a bit of a joke over at Google HQ; some users are even suing over its limitations.

By contrast, Enhanced Safe Browsing focuses on the security holes hackers are most likely to exploit. Per Google, Enhanced Safe Browsing uses multiple strategies to guarantee user safety: it checks websites against a constantly updated list of unsafe locations, examines unusual URLs for potential phishing scams, and inspects downloads for dangerous or corrupted files. It even takes a sampling of potential threats a given user has encountered and syncs it with their Google Account, allowing for personalized security focused on the risks that the user is most likely to face. All this happens in real time, as the user goes about their browsing session.

Note that Enhanced Safe Browsing’s real-time service means sending more user data to Google than browsing in normal or Incognito Mode. That’s a concern worth being aware of: big companies have security breaches, too, and are by no means universally trustworthy when it comes to user data. That said, participating in the digital world more or less requires users to operate within the ecosystem of one of a handful of large companies. If your home or office is a Google shop, Enhanced Safe Browsing is unquestionably the most secure option available.

Continue Reading

Trending