Connect with us

Tech News

India’s largest video streaming service, owned by Disney, breaks Safari compatibility to fix security flaw – TechCrunch

Published

on

Hotstar, India’s largest video streaming service with more than 300 million users, disabled support for Apple’s Safari web browser on Friday to mitigate a security flaw that allowed unauthorized usage of its platform, two sources familiar with the matter told TechCrunch.

The incident comes at a time when the streaming service — operated by Star India, part of 20th Century Fox that Disney acquired — enjoys peak attention as millions of people watch the ongoing ICC World Cup cricket tournament on its platform.

As users began to complain about not being able to use Hotstar on Safari, the company’s official support account asserted that “technical limitations” on Apple’s part were the bottleneck. “These limitations have been from Safari; there is very little we can do on this,” the account tweeted Friday evening.

Sources at Hotstar told TechCrunch that this was not an accurate description of the event. Instead, company’s engineers had identified a security hole that was being exploited by unauthorized users to access Hotstar’s content, they said.

Hotstar intends to work on patching the flaw soon and then reinstate support for Safari, the sources said.

The security flaw can only be exploited through Safari’s desktop and mobile browsers. On its website, the company recommends users to try Chrome and Firefox, or its mobile apps, to access the service. Hotstar did not respond to requests for comment.

Hotstar, which rivals Netflix and Amazon Prime Video in India, maintains a strong lead in the local video streaming market (based on number of users and engagement). Last month, it claimed to set a new global record by drawing more than 18 million viewers to a live cricket match.

Source link

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Tech News

The Easiest Way To Transfer Safari Bookmarks To Google Chrome

Published

on

Moving bookmarks between desktop browsers is fairly straightforward. You can either let Chrome automatically import the bookmarks or do it manually yourself, as explained on the Google Support website.

To auto-import browser bookmarks from Safari:

1. Fire up Chrome on your computer.

2. Click the three-dot menu button located in the upper right corner of the browser.

3. Navigate to Bookmarks > Import Bookmarks and Settings. 

4. Pick Safari from the drop-down menu.

5. Browsing history, Bookmarks, and Search are checked by default. Uncheck the other items if you only want to import the bookmarks.

6. Click Import and then Done.

As mentioned, you can also transfer the bookmarks manually, but you’ll need the related HTML file. This is also a simple process, but it takes a few extra steps.

1. Open Safari on your computer.

2. Go to File > Export Bookmarks.

3. Save the HTML file in your local Mac storage.

4. Open Chrome and go to Bookmarks > Import Bookmarks and Settings

5. This time, pick Bookmarks HTML File from the drop-down menu.

6. Locate the .html file and click Choose File.

On a fresh installation of Chrome, the imported bookmarks will appear on the bookmarks bar (you can show or hide the bar with Ctrl + Shift + B.) But if you’ve already created new bookmarks on Chrome, you’ll find the imported Safari bookmarks in a folder called “Other bookmarks.”

Continue Reading

Tech News

Bluetti Gives Veterans And Military Personnel A Treat This Memorial Day Weekend

Published

on

Bluetti is including some of its best and most versatile power stations up for grabs this memorial weekend with big price cuts. The EP500 (originally $4,599, discounted at $4,399) and EP500 Pro (originally $5,999, discounted at $4,999) may challenge your definition of “portable,” but they are great for instantly providing backup power to a whole house when the grid goes down, especially with their huge 5,100Wh batteries. On the opposite end of the spectrum, the 716Wh EB70S and 537Wh EB55 (originally $599, discounted at $549) won’t break your back with their super portable sizes. Make no mistake, though, they might be small, but they’re big on power and ports.

Of course, Bluetti’s modular power stations are also joining the party. The AC200 MAX and the B230 battery module (originally $3,299, discounted at $3,099) together dish out over 4,000W of pure AC Sine Wave of power. The AC200 MAX can also be charged to full in just two hours by combining both AC and solar inputs. The AC200P (originally $1,599, discounted at $1,499) brings the best of both worlds of power and portability with its 2,000Wh battery capacity, multiple outputs that can power 17 devices all at once, including wireless charging. And, of course, you can even expand that power by connecting a B230 battery module.

Bluetti’s Veterans and Military Benefits Program starts on May 26 at 7:00 PM PDT and ends on May 31 at the same time. It is open to both active personnel and veterans, and they only need to have their status verified through ID.me to get the discounts. Bluetti notes that the program is available for personal use only.

Continue Reading

Tech News

The Reason The FTC Just Hit Twitter With A $150 Million Fine

Published

on

In the FTC order, the commission states that Twitter had access to personal data from more than 140 million users in just the 2014 – 2019 period, which it then shared with advertisers. This was at a time when Twitter’s terms and conditions explicitly stated to its users that this information would be used for the sole purpose of securing their accounts.

According to the FTC and the United States Department of Justice, Twitter began sharing user data with advertisers in 2013 — around the same time it started allowing users to add their phone numbers for two-factor authentication. Before being called out by the FTC, Twitter maintained that it collected phone numbers and email addresses for the purpose of improving account security. Users could, for example, easily reset their passwords, or unlock their accounts using a verified phone number or email address. 

While the average Twitter user likely assumed their phone number and associated data were secure with Twitter, the company disregarded the trust users placed with them and shared this data with advertisers, the FTC orders states.

Continue Reading

Trending