Connect with us

Cars

Indigo subsea cable system chooses NextDC datacentres

Published

on

The Indigo subsea telecommunications cable will land in NextDC’s Perth and Sydney datacentres, the companies have announced.

The cable will connect to NextDC’s 6MW P1 and 16MW S1 datacentres, as well as the upcoming 20MW P2 and 30MW S2 datacentres, with the company saying it will be NextDC’s first P2 customer.

NextDC had in April said it would be raising AU$281 million for three new datacentre sites in Sydney, Perth, and Melbourne.

The provider in August announced a net profit of AU$6.6 million for FY18 on revenue of AU$161.5 million, AU$152.6 million of which was datacentre services revenue.

Being built by Telstra, SubPartners, Google, Singtel, AARNet, Indosat Ooredoo, and Alcatel Submarine Networks, the Indigo cable will span around 9,000km, connecting Sydney, Perth, Singapore, and Jakarta. It has two fibre pairs.

According to SubParters, the submarine cable’s construction remains on track, and will see the 36Tbps system go live in mid-2019.

The Indigo consortium last month completed its landing in Sydney at Coogee Beach, with the Central cable to be installed by early December.

“The Indigo cable system will utilise new spectrum sharing technology so each consortium member will have the ability to independently take advantage of technology advancements for future upgrades and capacity increases on demand,” the consortium said.

Telstra had in September announced the completion of the landing of Indigo West at Floreat Beach, Perth, with the 2,400km cable segment between Christmas Island and Perth having been laid.

Superloop completed the marine survey, cable system manufacturing and factory testing for both Indigo West and Indigo Central in August, as well as the drilling phase in Sydney for the landing of two subsea cables, installation of the beach manhole in Sydney for Indigo Central, and an agreement to provide its second landing facility to Southern Cross.

The Indigo Central final splice is expected to be complete in early December, and the Indigo West final splice in late December.

Superloop had acquired SubPartners for $2.5 million back in April 2017 just after the initial Indigo subsea cable announcement, saying it would provide the company with APAC submarine cable capacity and assets across the region.

Superloop had at the start of last year similarly announced that it would establish a point of presence at NextDC’s C1 datacentre in Canberra.

“I’ve worked with NextDC since its first facility, B1, opened in Brisbane,” Superloop CTO Ryan Crouch said in March 2017.

“This partnership between Superloop and NextDC has resulted in continual growth in collocation and network services for customers, and has seen our businesses grow in tandem.”

Subsea cables across the globe

  • The Indigo subsea cable system
  • Vocus’ Australia-Singapore Cable (ASC)
  • Vocus’ North West Cable System (NWCS) between Darwin and Port Hedland, and the new Tiwi Islands spur being added
  • The Australian government’s Coral Sea subsea cable, being constructed by Vocus to connect Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands and funded through the foreign aid budget
  • Google’s Dunant transatlantic subsea cable between Virginia Beach in the United States to the French Atlantic coast
  • The Indian government’s Chennai-Andaman and Nicobar islands subsea cable, being built by NEC
  • Southern Cross Cables’ NEXT subsea cable system between Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, being built by SubPartners
  • The Trident subsea cable system connecting Perth with Singapore via Indonesia
  • The Jupiter subsea cable connecting the US, Japan, and the Philippines and being built by a consortium including Facebook, Amazon, SoftBank, NTT Com, PLDT, and PCCW
  • The Hawaiki subsea cable between Australia, New Zealand, and the US
  • Superloop’s Hong Kong cable
  • Telstra’s Hong Kong Americas (HKA) cable between Hong Kong and the US
  • Telstra’s Pacific Light Cable Network (PLCN) between Hong Kong and the US
  • Google’s Japan-Guam-Australia (JGA) cable system
  • The Asia-Pacific Gateway (APG) subsea cable connecting China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, and Singapore, owned by a consortium including China Telecom, China Unicom, China Mobile, NTT Communications, KT Corporation, LG Uplus, StarHub, Chunghwa Telecom, CAT, Global Transit Communications, Viettel, and VNPT, and being constructed by NEC
  • The Southeast Asia Japan 2 cable (SJC2), which will have 11 landing stations in Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Hong Kong, China, South Korea, Taiwan, and Japan, being built by NEC and funded by a consortium including China Mobile International, Chunghwa Telecom, Chuan Wei, Facebook, KDDI, Singtel, SK Broadband, and VNPT
  • The Bay to Bay Express Cable System (BtoBE), connecting Singapore and Hong Kong with the US, being funded by consortium including Facebook, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and China Mobile International, and being built by NEC
  • The South Atlantic Cable System (SACS) connecting Angola and Brazil, going live in October 2018 after being built by NEC

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Cars

Galaxy Z Fold 4 Under-Display Camera May Get A Stealthy Makeover

Published

on

According to a tweet from the account @SamsungRydah, which was first spied by SamMobile and has since been removed by Twitter based on a copyright claim (seemingly lending credibility to the leak), the Galaxy Z Fold 4 will rectify the poor invisibility of the UDC. The model will reportedly use a different arrangement of pixels to make it denser, providing a 132ppi circle, up from the Galaxy Z Fold 3 model’s measly 94ppi. The result is that the hole will hopefully be less visible, and text should be less distorted in that area. Unfortunately, it’s not completely invisible, at least not based on the leaked slide.

What isn’t clear, however, is whether Samsung is also upgrading the camera sensor itself to something more than just 4MP. Increasing the sensor’s own pixel count could help offset whatever side effects the UDC panel might have in terms of quality. While the Galaxy Z Fold 3 foldable’s internal camera was moderately usable for video calls, it just didn’t sit well with buyers considering how much they’d paid for the premium phone.

An upgraded internal camera would be in line with upgrades to the other cameras expected for the Galaxy Z Fold 4. These include a 50MP main sensor and a 10MP telephoto with 3x optical zoom. These are moderate upgrades, of course, but Samsung seems to be taking a page from Apple’s book here by improving quality through software and other minor tweaks rather than going all out on what would be a bulky sensor that wouldn’t fit the Galaxy Z Fold 4 model’s slim profile.

Continue Reading

Cars

Today’s Wordle Answer #416 – August 9, 2022 Solution And Hints

Published

on

The answer to today’s Wordle puzzle (#416 – August 9, 2022) is patty. Its meaning varies across cultural contexts — to the British, it’s a small pie or pastry; to North Americans, it’s a small, round, and flat chocolate-covered peppermint sweet. More generally to Americans, it’s a small flat cake of minced or finely chopped food, especially meat (via Merriam-Webster). To Mr. Krabs of SpongeBob, it’s a veggie burger (and a moneymaker). Seeing as the word patty has roots in the French word “pat,e” which means dough, Mr. Krabs obviously knew what he was doing. 

We solved the puzzle in four tries today, just like yesterday and the day before. We began guessing with the word roate, which is an uncommon but excellent first guess (even the WordleBot thought so). After following up with fluid, we hit a lucky strike with catty — only one letter short of the correct answer.

Continue Reading

Cars

The Reason Ford Won’t Build A Mustang GT500 Convertible

Published

on

Ford won’t be making a convertible Mustang GT500 because… it’s too powerful.

Hau Thai-Tang, Ford’s chief product platform, and operations officer confirmed the S550 platform on which the Mustang was built had reached “the top end of the capabilities” (via Muscle Cars & Trucks).

Dave Pericack, former Director Enterprise Product Line Management — Ford Icons, backs up those comments even more bluntly. “The real reason” Ford isn’t making a convertible model is because, by removing the roof, the car would lose all its structure and stiffness in the chassis and body. The power of the GT500 is simply too much for a convertible car to handle.

The only way it could make a convertible model would be to “spend a lot of money in exotic material” to compensate for the loss of the roof and the structural integrity it provides (via Ford Authority). Ford is not prepared to do that, considering the S550 platform is nearing the end of its road. The S650 platform — the seventh generation of Ford Mustangs — is on its way and will, in all likelihood, be the last Mustang with an internal combustion engine.

Fear not Ford faithful. The Blue Oval is already looking to the future and has already built a 900hp electric Mustang to show the world that an EV can also be a muscle car.

Continue Reading

Trending