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Instagram is using object recognition tech to describe photos for visually impaired users – TechCrunch

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Instagram is a visual service; it’s a feed of photos and videos and memes that users take in, but the company is rethinking how to optimize a visual service for users with visual impairments via a couple of new features.

The accessibility-focused update rolling out today offers two options to give visually impaired users alternative text descriptions of what’s happening in posts. One leverages user text input while the other uses Facebook’s object recognition tech to do the heavy lifting.

The descriptions will surface for users utilizing screen readers. The user-input alternative text option will pop up in advanced settings when a user is posting a photo. It’s definitely a little out of the way, but it exists now, so that’s something. While there’s a level of depth that can only come from a human-written visual description, the company’s use of its object recognition software is obviously going to be carrying out most of the text descriptions on items in the Feed, Explore and Profile sections.

It’s an interesting proposition for a service that has made a name for itself through being almost entirely visual, keeping text and external navigations at bay while promoting a feed that’s all about visual absorption. At this point Instagram is far from fringe, and neither is the segment of the population that has a visual impairment — 285 million according to the blog post announcing the feature.

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Nothing’s Ear (Stick) Teaser Tells Us A Whole Lot Of Nothing

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The good news for fans of the relatively new company is that we know Nothing will be launching a new audio product by the end of the year. The bad news is that we know almost nothing about the product except for its name: the Nothing Ear (Stick). The company included a couple of teaser images with its announcement, but none of them really give us a look at the product, instead showcasing a cylindrical container (presumably the charging case) with the company’s logo on it.

Nothing calls the Ear (Stick) “the next evolution” in its own audio lineup, reinforcing the same ethos it used to hawk its smartphone: that of a simplistic device that doesn’t get in the way — possibly in the literal sense this time around, as Nothing describes the product as featuring “supremely comfortable” ergonomics and a “feather-light” design. If there’s any point that seems worth getting excited about, it’s the mention that Ear (Stick) will be “molded to your ears.”

Whether that refers to a pair of earbuds that will come with silicone putty for creating custom ear molds is anyone’s guess, but the concept itself is definitely a thing. Beyond that, Nothing confirmed the earbuds will have a “unique charging case,” so it’s safe to say they likely sport a true wireless design. Sadly, Nothing won’t tell us anything about the product’s specs and price right now, but it did say the model will arrive sometime before 2023.

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Apple Stage Manager’s iPadOS 16 Surprise Could Save You From Buying A New One

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Among the older Apple iPad models that have officially received the nod (via Engadget) for Stage Manager on iPadOS 16 include the 11-inch iPad Pro (first generation and above) and the 12.9-inch iPad Pro (third generation and above). These relatively new iPad models come powered by Apple’s A12X Bionic and A12Z Bionic chipsets. Since Stage Manager was initially designed for M1-powered iPads running iOS 16 or beyond, enabling it on older hardware comes with a few trade-offs. 

While the M1-powered iPad can simultaneously open up to eight live apps on the screen, the maximum number of live apps on older models is limited to just four. In addition, older iPads running iPadOS 16 and beyond would also not be able to invoke Stage Manager while using the devices with external displays. Interestingly, Apple is yet to enable external display support for Stage Manager on even the M1 iPads. However, the company did confirm that Stage Manager for the M1 iPads will be enabled on the M1 iPads via a software update before the end of 2022. 

Apart from enabling Stage Manager on older iPads, the next version of iPadOS 16 (likely to be called iPadOS 16.1) could incorporate a lot of bug fixes. Per Apple’s current plan, the public beta version of iPadOS 16 should reach customers by October. Apple has also confirmed that Stage Manager will also make it to macOSVentura, which is also set for release in October 2022.

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How To Reset And Pair Your Roku Remote

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When your Roku streaming device is freezing up or your remote isn’t working correctly, the problem can often be fixed by simply rebooting the machine, which Roku calls a system restart. If that method doesn’t work, however, users also have the option of resetting the device, which will return it to factory settings. That means you’ll need to set the device back up as if it is new, and that’s why you should try restarting the device before resetting it. The steps to restart are identical for the simple Roku remote and the basic voice remote, both of which use standard AAA batteries:

  1. Slide the battery compartment cover off and remove the batteries.
  2. Disconnect the main device’s power cable and reconnect it after at least 5 to 10 seconds have passed.
  3. Immediately after Roku’s main interface appears onscreen, complete the restart process by re-inserting the batteries into the remote and sliding the cover back in place.

The following are steps for people who own a Roku Voice Remote Pro:

  1. Disconnect the main device’s power cable.
  2. Reconnect it after at least 5 to 10 seconds have passed.
  3. As soon as Roku’s main interface appears onscreen, complete the restart process by long-pressing the pairing button on the remote for 20 seconds.
  4. When you see a slowly blinking green light stop then switch to rapid-fire blinking, let the reset button go.

Another way to restart that works for most types of Roku remotes is by going through the gadget’s “Settings” menu. This is the option you’ll want to use if the Roku’s power cord is located somewhere difficult to reach, according to the company.

  1. Hit the Home icon on the remote.
  2. Go to “Settings.”
  3. Pick “System.”
  4. Choose “Power.” If it’s unavailable, go to the next step.
  5. Hit “System restart,” then confirm by choosing “Restart.”
  6. Immediately after Roku’s main interface appears onscreen, follow step 3 onwards for your specific Roku remote listed above.

Simple Roku remote users can instantly press buttons to check for responsiveness. Those who own voice remotes have to wait at least half a minute to check whether the system restart fixed the issue.

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