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Intel announces 5G modem for 2019

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(Image: Intel)

Intel has announced the XMM 8160 5G multimode modem, making the product available six months earlier than initially planned in order to support deployments of 5G mobile networks globally.

The modem will provide 5G connectivity to smartphones, PCs, and broadband access gateways, with Intel saying it will provide peak speeds of up to 6Gbps when it launches in the second half of 2019.

The modem will support standalone and non-standalone 5G NR deployments, as well 4G LTE, 3G, and 2G in a single chipset, and supports millimetre-wave (mmWave) spectrum as well as frequencies between 600MHz and 6GHz to support carriers worldwide.

“The Intel XMM 8160 5G modem will enable device manufacturers to design smaller and more power-efficient devices. This can be achieved without the added complexity, power management, and form factor adjustments of two separate modems for 5G and legacy connectivity, as will be introduced in early competing 5G modems,” Intel explained.

“By advancing directly to a multimode solution, Intel will offer very clear improvements in power, size, and scalability.”

According to Intel, devices that use the XMM 8160 5G modem will become available in the first half of 2020.

“We are seeing great demand for the advanced feature set of the XMM 8160, such that we made a strategic decision to pull in the launch of this modem by half a year to deliver a leading 5G solution,” corporate vice president and GM of Intel’s Communication and Devices Group Dr Cormac Conroy said.

Read also: Intel at MWC: How 5G will change the PC

Intel had in September revealed that its technology will be used by both Nokia and Ericsson in the first series of 5G deployments globally.

“Intel is powering the first wave of 5G networks,” Intel SVP of 5G and Network Platform Group Sandra Rivera said.

“Starting with our 5G New Radio modems, we’re building a portfolio of capabilities that lend an additional foundation to the hundreds of millions of modem devices that we have shipped to the market for 4G networks.”

Nokia told ZDNet that there have been three main areas of collaboration between Intel and Nokia: Its AirFrame, AirScale, and ReefShark products.

“On the technical aspect, we’re looking at the AirFrame platform that Nokia has, which is the basis for our cloud core infrastructure, the edge cloud … the second area we were talking about is the AirScale, which is our radio access family; it’s the same family that we use for 2G, 3G, 4G, and now 5G so it’s like a multi-radio access technology,” Nokia told ZDNet.

“We have developed with Intel’s support on the manufacturing side the system on a chip chipsets that go into that, because you need to develop these things with silicon rather than components in order to reach the power consumption levels, and that ReefShark chipset family is one that they’ve been heavily involved with.”

Lastly, Intel enabled Nokia to undertake trials with customers by opening up its 5G Mobile Trial Platform, Nokia said.

According to Ericsson head of Networks Portfolio Management, Product Area Networks Jawad Manssour, Intel and Ericsson have collaborated on 5G for carriers across the globe, including T-Mobile, Sprint, AT&T, Verizon, Deutsche Telekom, Vodafone Group, BT, Telia, Swisscom, Telefonica, Lifecell, Etisalat, MTN, Turkcell, Ooredoo, Orange, China Mobile, China Unicom, SoftBank, NTT DoCoMo, KDDI, Chungwa Telecom, Far EasTone, and Telstra.

“We’ve been collaborating for quite a few years since the early 2000s, and for 5G we’ve been collaborating since four years back,” Manssour said.

“It’s a really comprehensive collaboration, so it started by … predicting how the standards would look like, and this enabled us to start very early on to develop systems for trial activities.”

One such collaboration was during the Winter Olympic Games earlier in 2018.

At the end of September, Intel also announced a series of new 5G developments in China alongside Huawei, ZTE, Tencent, China Mobile, China Telecom, China Unicom, Baidu, and Unisoc.

As part of the swathe of announcements this week, Unisoc CTO Xiaoxin Qiu said his company will be using Intel’s 5G modems in mid-tier Android smartphones globally.

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These Are 3 Of The Worst EVs Of All Time

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If you walk into any Chevrolet dealership today, you are more than likely to see a few Chevy Sparks on the lot. The current model is equipped with a 1.4L four-cylinder engine that puts out a grand total of 98 horsepower. It’s Chevy’s cheapest car at just under $14,000 and offers features like CarPlay standard. Until recently, some new Sparks could be configured with manual crank windows — truly innovative.

Back in 2013, General Motors made an all-electric version of the Spark to comply with California’s (new at the time) emissions regulations (via Green Car Reports). The result was a less than valiant effort. Its motors were assembled just outside of Baltimore, Maryland, and shipped all the way to GM’s operations in South Korea for production.

For specs, the Spark wasn’t weak at 140 horsepower and over 300 foot-pounds of torque, but it only had a realistic range of about 80 miles, and it took more than seven hours to charge without a fast charger. An Edmunds review of the 2016 model noted that charging from a 110-volt outlet took over 20 hours for a full battery. To make matters worse, Spark EVs in the United States were only offered in Oregon, California and Maryland, according to Edmunds. 

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Which Is The Better Electric Car?

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If you prioritize acceleration, battery range, and self-driving technology, the Tesla Model 3 is the clear winner. However, the Polestar 2 comes on top if you consider comfort and interior quality. Besides that, the Polestar 2 is a hatchback with hints of a premium Volvo and the Tesla Model 3 is a sedan similar to the Model S — but smaller.

As for the price, the 2023 Polestar 2 starts at $48,800. If you’re buying the 2022 model, it will cost you about $2,500 less than the 2023 model. But if you want the 2023 Long Range Dual Motor trim, it will cost you about $51,900. The biggest improvement of the 2023 Polestar 2 over the 2022 model year is the 11 miles of extra range on the Long Range Dual Motor variant.

The Tesla Model 3 Rear-Wheel Drive starts at $46,990, while the Long-Range trim is sold at $54,490. The Tesla Model 3 Performance is the most expensive trim at $61,990. But with the U.S. Inflation Reduction Act, the Tesla Model 3 will become eligible for the $7,500 tax credit starting January 1, 2023 — although only the trims that are sold for less than $55,000 will be considered.

Unless Volvo builds the Polestar 2 in the U.S., it won’t qualify for the new tax incentive under the Inflation Reduction Act. However, we know Volvo is building an electric SUV in the U.S., and it will be known as the Polestar 3. 

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Google Stadia Shutdown Took Employees, Game Devs By Surprise

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Video game designer and founding member of multiple game studios, Rebecca Heineman shared on Twitter that her company was lined up for a Stadia game release on the first day of November, but instead got heartbreak. Indie developer Simon Roth mentioned that neither did he receive any warning in advance from Google, nor did the Stadia division reach out to him via email or phone well after the news broke out.

But it was not just indie developers that Google kept in the dark. Even heavyweights like Bungie, which brought users “Halo” and “Destiny” games, were apparently unaware of the Stadia bombshell dropping out of nowhere. Plaion, which owns multiple publishing units and ten game studios, also pointed out that it wasn’t informed in advance. Publishers Goldfire Studios and No More Robots told Kotaku that they each had a game coming out on Stadia next year.

Pixel Games shared that it finalized the deal to bring no less than three games over to Google’s cloud gaming service just a day earlier. Google, on the other hand, is reportedly working with the affected studios with schemes like reimbursing the costs of development and porting existing games to its platform. According to an Axios report, Stadia reps are reaching out to publishing and development partners with reimbursement deals.

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