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JBL’s new Bluetooth speakers range from tiny to massive (and expensive)

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In addition to announcing a trio of new wireless earbuds today, JBL has announced a range of Bluetooth speakers. When we use the phrase “range,” we mean it too, as these new speakers vary in size from tiny clip-on speakers that hang off a belt loop to massive boomboxes that have built-in wheels. As you might imagine, along with those vast differences in size comes a difference in features and price too.

JBL Clip 4

One of the smallest speakers JBL announced today is the the Clip 4. Those who have one of the previous-generation Clips know what this is all about, as portability is the name of the game. JBL says this mini speaker has a 10-hour battery life, is IP67 water and dustproof, and supports Bluetooth 5.1. The company has even upgraded the carabiner for this release, though we’re not sure what exactly that upgrade entails.

JBL Go 3

Just like the Clip 4, the JBL Go 3 is a tiny speaker that puts portability before sound quality, so it shouldn’t be surprising that both speakers have a similar feature set. In the Go 3, we can expect battery life of around five hours along with the same support for Bluetooth 5.1 and the same IP67 water and dust resistance rating we saw in the Clip 4.

JBL Xtreme 3

Here’s where things start to get a little more impressive (and expensive, for that matter). The Xtreme 3 looks more or less the same as previous speakers in the line, as you’ve got the two Bass Radiators on either side of the device. On the inside, you’ll find four drivers and a battery that’s good for 15 hours of usage on a full charge. The Xtreme 3 can connect to other speakers through JBL’s PartyBoost for stereo sound and, like the Clip 4 and Go 3, includes IP67 waterproofing and dustproofing.

JBL PartyBox On-The-Go

Next up we have the PartyBox On-The-Go, which is so big it needs a shoulder strap for portability. This is a speaker for the karaoke fans of the world, as it ships with a wireless mic that has bass, treble, and echo tuning. The speaker itself boasts a 100W output; supports Bluetooth, USB, and AUX connections; and also puts on a light show which is synced to the music that’s playing. It even has physical mic and guitar inputs, so you can use it as an amp if you need to.

One thing to keep in mind about the Partybox On-The-Go is the fact that it’s only IPX4 splash resistant, so don’t go submerging it in water. Look for the battery in this speaker to last for around 6 hours before it needs a recharge.

JBL PartyBox 310

We started with the tiny Clip 4 and Go 3, and now we’re ending with the the PartyBox 310 – a speaker that own set of wheels and a retactible handle. The PartyBox 310 serves up a number of improvements over the PartyBox On-The-Go, outputting at 240W with an 18-hour battery life (at least according to JBL’s own metrics). Like the PartyBox On-The-Go, lights inside the speaker sync up to the music and the PartyBox 310 carries the same IPX4 splashproof rating as its more portable cousin.

Here, however, we’ll also find a set of backlit physical controls on the top of the speaker, along with dual mic and guitar inputs. The speaker even has onboard vocal tuning, which might be a little extreme for most but appreciated by the budding karaoke star. It seems like a pretty intense Bluetooth speaker, but of course, it has an intense price tag to go along with it.

Pricing and availability

Of the five speakers announced today, the JBL Go 3 is the least expensive of the bunch, coming in at $39.95 with availability in October. The Clip 34, on the other hand, is launching in November and is priced at $69.95. With the JBL PartyBox On-The-Go, which is available now, we take a big jump up in price to $299.95. The Xtreme 3 will run $349.95 when it launches in November, while the PartyBox 310 will set you back a whopping $499.95 when it launches later this month.

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Realme’s Next Premium Tablet Looks To Have An Unusual Design

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Even though we still have six days before the Realme Pad X launches in China, some of the specs of the Realme Pad X have already been confirmed by Realme’s CMO Xu Qi Chase, GSMArena claims. We know that this mid-range tablet will get the Qualcomm Snapdragon 870 chipset. This also means that the Realme Pad X will become the first Realme tablet to feature 5G connectivity. While the CMO did not reveal the rest of the specs, there’s been rumors about the likelihood of the Realme Pad fetting a QHD+ display that could also support a 120 Hz refresh rate.

From the images, it is also evident that the Realme Pad X gets a single rear-facing camera that is situated on an unusually large camera bump. There is a smaller circle below the rear camera with a prominent “AI” logo. The tablet also skips an LED flash for low-light situations.

Designwise, the Realme Pad looks like a contemporary tablet with small bezels and flat sides. One of the invites also showcases the Realme Pad X being used with a stylus. It remains to be seen if this accessory will be part of the retail package or an optional extra. With the launch date for this product a week away, there is a good chance that we could have additional details about the Realme Pad X before the official launch.

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Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 Revealed As The Heart Of Your Next Android Flagship Phone

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Qualcomm’s latest flagship processor continues to be based on a 4nm manufacturing process — albeit this time from TSMC. This change has allowed Qualcomm to increase the GPU and CPU clock speeds by up to 7%. The result is that the Prime Cortex X2 is now clocked at 3.2 GHz (as opposed to 3 GHz on the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1). Similarly, the 3x Cortex A710 core now clocks at 2.8 GHz (compared to 2.5 GHz earlier).

Then we have the 4x Cortex A-510 efficiency cores that also see a jump from 1.8 GHz to 2 GHz. While Qualcomm is yet to reveal the clock speeds for the Adreno GPU on the Snapdragon 8+ Gen1, they already claim a 10% higher clock speed in the promotional materials.

The rest of the hardware on the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 is similar to that of its predecessor — and this includes the X65 integrated modem as well. The new chip continues to support 3200 MHz LPDDR5 RAM, and the ISP used is the same, with support for 200 MP resolution, 8K video capture, and 64 MP burst capture. In terms of encoding, the chip retains support for Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HDR10, and HLG. A glaring omission, this time around too, is the lack of support for the AV1 codec.

In simpler terms, apart from the faster performance on account of the supposedly better manufacturing process, the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 does not add anything over its predecessor in terms of additional features.

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Why Black Holes Slow Down Time As You Get Closer To One

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To understand why time slows down as an object gets closer to a black hole, it is necessary to understand what time dilation is. Live Science explains that Einstein — obsessed with space and time — was the first to realize that time was relative. After more than a decade of work, Einstein published his general theory of relativity in 1915, shocking the Newtonian establishment and revolutionizing science. Einstein argued that while the laws of physics are constant throughout the universe (via The Conversation), speed or motion, space, and time are not constant but relative. Relative to what? To the point of observation or observer.

Einstein often spoke about trains and how people on and off moving trains would perceive time and speed differently. He cited, for example, that a speeding train would move much faster for a person standing on the side of the track than for a person chasing the train on another train running parallel to it. This has fueled a range of wild experiments with clocks and atomic clocks, and the answers proved Einstein was right: time is not constant and it can dilate.

But to be scientifically accurate, time does not change because of where an observer may be; it changes due to changes in gravity. Scientists have proven these changes in time by measuring atomic clocks on top of buildings and on ground levels, or on orbiting satellites and on Earth. So, if gravity can change time, what would happen to time in the presence of the massive gravitational forces of a black hole?

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