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JioSaavn becomes India’s answer to Spotify and Apple Music

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India finally has its answer to Spotify after Reliance Jio merged its music service with Saavn, the startup it acquired earlier this year.

The deal itself isn’t new — it was announced back in March — but it has reached its logical conclusion after two apps were merged to create a single entity, JioSaavn, which is valued at $1 billion. For the first time, India has a credible rival to global names like Spotify and Apple Music through the combination of a venture capital-funded business, Saavn, and good old-fashioned telecom, JioMusic from Reliance’s disruptive Jio operator brand.

This merger deal comes days after reports suggested that Spotify is preparing to (finally) enter the Indian market, a move that has been in the planning for more than a year as we have reported.

That would set up an interesting battle between global names Spotify and Apple and local players JioSaavn and Gaana, a project from media firm Times Internet, which is also backed by China’s Tencent.

It isn’t uncommon to see international firms compete in Asia — Walmart and Amazon are the two major e-commerce players, while Chinese firms Alibaba and Tencent have busily snapped up stakes in promising internet companies for the past couple of years — but that competition has finally come to the streaming space.

There have certainly been misses over the years.

Early India-based pioneer Dhingana was scooped by Rdio back in 2014, having initial shut down its service due to financial issues. Ultimately, though, Rdio itself went bankrupt and was sold to Pandora, leaving both Rdio and Dhingana in the startup graveyard.

Saavn, the early competitor to Dhingana, seemed destined to a similar fate, at least from the outside. But it hit the big time in 2015 when it raised $100 million from Tiger Global, the New York hedge fund that made ambitious bets on a number of India’s most promising internet firms. That gave it the fuel to reach this merger deal with JioMusic.

Unlike Dhingana’s fire sale, Saavn’s executive team continues on under the JioSaavn banner.

The coming-together is certainly a far more solid outcome than the Rdio deal. JioSaavn has some 45 million songs — including a slate of originals started by Saavn — and access to the Jio network, which claims more than 250 million subscribers.

JioSaavn is available across iOS, Android, web and Reliance Jio’s own app store

The JioMusic service will be freemium, but Jio subscribers will get a 90-day trial of the ad-free “Pro” service. The company maintains five offices — including outposts in Mountain View and New York — with more than 200 employees, while Reliance has committed to pumping $100 million into the business for “growth and expansion of the platform.”

While it is linked to Reliance and Jio, JioMusic is a private business that counts Reliance as a stakeholder. You’d imagine that remaining private is a major carrot that has kept Saavn founders — Rishi Malhotra, Paramdeep Singh and Vinodh Bhat — part of the business post-merger.

The window certainly seems open for streaming IPOs — Spotify went public this past April through an unconventional listing that valued its business around $30 billion, while China’s Tencent Music is in the process of a listing that could raise $1.2 billion and value it around that $30 billion mark, too. JioSaavn might be the next streamer to test the public markets.

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Sean Gallagher and an AI expert break down our crazy machine-learning adventure

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We’ve spent the past few weeks burning copious amounts of AWS compute time trying to invent an algorithm to parse Ars’ front-page story headlines to predict which ones will win an A/B test—and we learned a lot. One of the lessons is that we—and by “we,” I mainly mean “me,” since this odyssey was more or less my idea—should probably have picked a less, shall we say, ambitious project for our initial outing into the machine-learning wilderness. Now, a little older and a little wiser, it’s time to reflect on the project and discuss what went right, what went somewhat less than right, and how we’d do this differently next time.

Our readers had tons of incredibly useful comments, too, especially as we got into the meaty part of the project—comments that we’d love to get into as we discuss the way things shook out. The vagaries of the edit cycle meant that the stories were being posted quite a bit after they were written, so we didn’t have a chance to incorporate a lot of reader feedback as we went, but it’s pretty clear that Ars has some top-shelf AI/ML experts reading our stories (and probably groaning out loud every time we went down a bit of a blind alley). This is a great opportunity for you to jump into the conversation and help us understand how we can improve for next time—or, even better, to help us pick smarter projects if we do an experiment like this again!

Our chat kicks off on Wednesday, July 28, at 1:00 pm Eastern Time (that’s 10:00 am Pacific Time and 17:00 UTC). Our three-person panel will consist of Ars Infosec Editor Emeritus Sean Gallagher and me, along with Amazon Senior Principal Technical Evangelist (and AWS expert) Julien Simon. If you’d like to register so that you can ask questions, use this link here; if you just want to watch, the discussion will be streamed on the Ars Twitter account and archived as an embedded video on this story’s page. Register and join in or check back here after the event to watch!

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Kaseya gets master decryptor to help customers still suffering from REvil attack

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Kaseya—the remote management software seller at the center of a ransomware operation that struck as many as 1,500 downstream networks—said it has obtained a decryptor that should successfully restore data encrypted during the Fourth of July weekend attack.

Affiliates of REvil, one of the Internet’s most cutthroat ransomware groups, exploited a critical zero-day vulnerability in Miami, Florida-based Kaseya’s VSA remote management product. The vulnerability—which Kaseya was days away from patching—allowed the ransomware operators to compromise the networks of about 60 customers. From there, the extortionists infected as many as 1,500 networks that relied on the 60 customers for services.

Finally, a universal decryptor

“We obtained the decryptor yesterday from a trusted third party and have been using it successfully on affected customers,” Dana Liedholm, senior VP of corporate marketing, wrote in an email on Thursday morning. “We are providing tech support to use the decryptor. We have a team reaching out to our customers and I don’t have more detail right now.”

In a private message, threat analyst Brett Callow of security firm Emsisoft said: “We are working with Kaseya to support their customer engagement efforts. We have confirmed the key is effective at unlocking victims and will continue to provide support to Kaseya and its customers.”

REvil had demanded as much as $70 million for a universal decryptor that would restore the data of all organizations compromised in the mass attack. Liedholm declined to say if Kaseya paid any sum in exchange for the decryption tool. Kaseya has since patched the zero-day used in the attack.

That means that, for the time being, it’s not publicly known if Kaseya paid the ransom or received it for free from either REvil, a law enforcement agency, or a private security company.

In the days following the attack, REvil’s site on the dark web, along with other infrastructure the group uses to provide technical support and process payments, suddenly went offline. The unexplained exit left victims and researchers worried that the data would remain locked up forever, since the only people with the ability to decrypt it had vanished.

Where did it come from?

REvil is one of several ransomware groups believed to operate out of Russia or another Eastern European country that was formerly part of Soviet Union. The group’s disappearance came a few days after President Joe Biden warned his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin that, if Russia didn’t rein in those ransomware groups, the US might take unilateral action against them.

Observers have speculated since then that either Putin pressured the group to go quiet or the group, rattled by all the attention it received from the attack, decided to do so on its own.

Some of the companies victimized by the attack include Swedish grocery store chain COOP, Virginia Tech, two Maryland towns, New Zealand schools, and international textile company Miroglio Group.

REvil is also behind a crippling attack on JBS, the world’s biggest producer of meat. The breach caused JBS to temporarily close some plants.

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AT&T nightmare: Woman had to wait 3+ months for broadband at new home

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Enlarge / Lovie Newman tells News 4 San Antonio about having to wait nearly four months for AT&T Internet service.

AT&T reportedly forced a San Antonio woman to wait nearly four months to get Internet service at her new home, and she didn’t get close to solving the problem until she asked a local news station for help.

“Lovie Newman planned for a smooth transition into her new home, including scheduling a transfer for her AT&T high-speed Internet service in advance,” according to a report Tuesday by News 4 San Antonio.

The house Newman moved into was apparently newly built and not yet connected to AT&T’s network, but it sounds like the months-long wait was due primarily to mistakes by AT&T technicians and customer-service problems. In what Newman called “a complete nightmare,” AT&T continually rebuffed her attempts to get Internet service.

Newman scheduled an installation appointment for April 1, but when the day came, AT&T called to say, “we need to reschedule,” she told the news station. Initially, Newman “was told there was a service outage in her new far East Side neighborhood,” News 4 journalist Darian Trotter reported. “Technicians were working on it, but she says they had no idea when service in the area would be restored.”

“I wasn’t hearing back, and I kept getting rescheduled and pushed around to different departments,” Newman said.

“You never came to my house”

Newman was able to schedule another installation appointment in May after the outage was fixed, but installers never came to her house. “For three and a half months, she says she made countless efforts to get connected, including the one time she got an appointment and eagerly waited for technicians to arrive,” News 4 said.

Newman was at home waiting for installers to arrive when she got a message from AT&T saying, “we missed you,” she told News 4. “I’m like, ‘you never came to my house. How did you miss me?'” AT&T installers had mistakenly gone to a different address in Alamo Heights, the report said.

“Out of desperation, she considered switching service providers,” but “an online search of at least three companies revealed service in her neighborhood wasn’t available.” The TV station’s video report shows that those three providers were Charter Spectrum, Grande Communications, and Google Fiber.

“I put in my address and it said, ‘not available,'” Newman said. Newman was afraid of losing her job because of the lack of AT&T Internet service, but News 4 said that “Newman’s employer was able to make special accommodations to keep her working.”

Even though AT&T has dragged its feet for months, its website says that service should be readily available to Newman. We entered Newman’s address into AT&T’s online availability checker, and it reports that fiber-to-the-home service is available where she lives:

AT&T gets moving after hearing from reporter

After months of waiting for AT&T to provide a broadband connection, Newman contacted Trotter at News 4 over two weeks ago. The station reached out to AT&T, and while the company initially did not reply to the media organization, the prospect of news coverage got AT&T’s attention.

The news video showed an email sent to Newman on July 8 from an employee in an AT&T executive office. “The AT&T Office of the President (OOP) received a communication from a local news media reporter,” the email said. “However, since you are our customer, I wanted to reach out to you directly.”

The week after that July 8 email, News 4 “received a statement from a spokeswoman saying, ‘our team has already begun looking into this and is in contact with Ms. Newman,'” Trotter said in the news report. Newman was still waiting for service to be installed this week when the News 4 report aired. “I want my Internet to be installed, up and running by this weekend,” she told the station.

Due to News 4 prodding AT&T into action, it seems that Newman is finally close to getting connected—nearly four months after AT&T abruptly canceled her first installation appointment. “After we got involved, Newman says techs have recently installed wiring, and an Internet box has been set up outside her home,” Trotter said at the end of his report. “Everything is ready, she just needs to schedule the installation.”

We contacted Newman and AT&T today about whether service has been or will soon be installed and will update this article if we get new information.

Newman’s AT&T nightmare unfortunately not unique

Newman’s ordeal is similar to one we wrote about in April. In that case, Comcast had an error in its coverage map and falsely told the customers that Internet service would be available at their new home. The couple, Edward Koll and Jo Narkon, then paid Comcast $5,000 for a network extension, but the project kept getting delayed. Comcast finally provided Internet service after Koll contacted Ars and we reached out to Comcast’s public relations department.

Koll and Narkon ended up waiting six months for cable Internet and had to use unreliable and data-capped cell service that entire time. We’ve written other stories over the years about Comcast falsely telling customers that they could get service. After our article about Koll and Narkon published a few months ago, we heard from a few more people in Comcast territory who were incorrectly told that Internet service would be available at their homes.

We also wrote about a frustrated AT&T-using family in Mississippi in November 2020. AT&T had falsely promised Kathie McNamee and her family U-verse Internet service of about 5Mbps, which is slow by today’s standards but still much faster than what they ended up getting. Ultimately, AT&T only provided the family speeds of up to 768kbps over its legacy DSL network and has not upgraded its network there or in many other areas where glacially slow AT&T speeds are the norm.

This kind of AT&T home-Internet problem is nothing new. Back in 2015, we wrote about a family in Georgia that couldn’t get AT&T Internet at a home they bought even though their neighbors and the home’s previous owners had service. AT&T said it didn’t have enough capacity to hook up additional customers.

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