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Labor commits to kicking in AU$5m for Sunshine Coast JGA cable landing

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(Image: Sunshine Coast Council)

Should a Shorten government come to power in Australia this year, the Labor party will commit to spending AU$5 million on the 550km Japan-Guam-Australia (JGA) cable extension landing at Maroochydore, situated around 100km north of Brisbane.

The opposition party reiterated the numbers produced when the extension was announced in September, and how it would contribute to 864 new jobs and AU$927 million in new investment for Queensland.

The Sunshine Coast Council will fork out AU$35 million for the extension, while the state government will kick in AU$15 million.

Pointing to former Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s support for the extension, Labor called on current Prime Minister Scott Morrison to support it.

In November, Sunshine Coast Council announced Vertiv would build the AU$6.6 million cable landing station

The 9,500km JGA cable is being developed in two parts, with AARNet, Google, and RCI Connectivity handling the southern part from Australia to Guam, with RCI being the sole developer of the northern part between Japan and Guam. The cable is being built by NEC and Alcatel Submarine Networks, and is due to be completed by the first half of 2020.

Meanwhile, Telstra has said it has begun deploying Infinera’s Infinite Capacity Engine 4 on its Asia Pacific subsea cables. Australia’s incumbent telco said the move will increase its fibre capacity by 160 percent, port density by 140 percent, and reduce power consumption.

The deployment will be completed “in the coming months”, Telstra said.

Last week, the telco launched its rapid restoration service for subsea cable outages on three of its intra-Asia routes, which could see times reduced to minutes.

Telstra is using Ericsson equipment with Ciena’s GeoMesh Extreme to boost the virtualisation and automation of its subsea cable network.

“The Asian region presents one of the most challenging environments for subsea cable systems. Busy and shallow shipping ports in Hong Kong and Singapore, high-levels of fishing activity and an ecosystem prone to natural disasters, all threaten to disrupt or damage underwater infrastructure,” Telstra’s Head of Connectivity and Platforms Nadya Melic said.

“Damage to a subsea cable can take weeks or even months to fix. But with our new continuous connection service, we are able to reroute customers impacted by potential damage to another subsea cable path on our three path network in less than 30 minutes.”

Melic added the under half-hour period was “almost seamless restoration”.

Subsea cables across the globe

  • Vocus’ Australia-Singapore Cable (ASC)
  • Vocus’ North West Cable System (NWCS) between Darwin and Port Hedland, and the new Tiwi Islands spur being added
  • The Australian government’s Coral Sea subsea cable, being constructed by Vocus to connect Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands and funded through the foreign aid budget
  • Google’s Dunant transatlantic subsea cable between Virginia Beach in the United States to the French Atlantic coast
  • The Indian government’s Chennai-Andaman and Nicobar islands subsea cable, being built by NEC
  • Southern Cross Cables’ NEXT subsea cable system between Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, being built by SubPartners
  • The Trident subsea cable system connecting Perth with Singapore via Indonesia
  • The Jupiter subsea cable connecting the US, Japan, and the Philippines and being built by a consortium including Facebook, Amazon, SoftBank, NTT Com, PLDT, and PCCW
  • The Hawaiki subsea cable between Australia, New Zealand, and the US
  • Superloop’s Hong Kong cable
  • Telstra’s Hong Kong Americas (HKA) cable between Hong Kong and the US
  • Telstra’s Pacific Light Cable Network (PLCN) between Hong Kong and the US
  • Google’s Japan-Guam-Australia (JGA) cable system
  • The Asia-Pacific Gateway (APG) subsea cable connecting China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, and Singapore, owned by a consortium including China Telecom, China Unicom, China Mobile, NTT Communications, KT Corporation, LG Uplus, StarHub, Chunghwa Telecom, CAT, Global Transit Communications, Viettel, and VNPT, and being constructed by NEC
  • The Southeast Asia Japan 2 cable (SJC2), which will have 11 landing stations in Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Hong Kong, China, South Korea, Taiwan, and Japan, being built by NEC and funded by a consortium including China Mobile International, Chunghwa Telecom, Chuan Wei, Facebook, KDDI, Singtel, SK Broadband, and VNPT
  • The Bay to Bay Express Cable System (BtoBE), connecting Singapore and Hong Kong with the US, being funded by consortium including Facebook, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and China Mobile International, and being built by NEC

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How To Back Up Your Mac To iCloud

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iCloud can come in clutch in a variety of situations. For example, you may not need to wrestle with Migration Assistant when setting up a new Mac if you’ve backed up all your important data to iCloud. However, there’s a reason Apple still puts Time Machine on every Mac the company sells: Time Machine backs up your Mac’s entire system, including all your apps and files. Not only that, but Time Machine also keeps a version history of every change you make to your Mac on an hourly and daily basis.

Depending on the sizes of both your Time Machine drive and your Mac’s internal storage drive, your Time Machine history could stretch back days, months, or even years. Time Machine can be a real lifesaver, too, if the developer of an app you use stops publishing it since you can always just reinstall it from your Time Machine backup. You almost can’t have too many backups of your important data, so there’s not much reason not to take advantage of both Time Machine and iCloud when protecting the files on your Mac. And since both options handle backups differently than the other, you’re not getting duplicate backups but rather a more expansive backup overall.

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Honda Prologue EV SUV Gets First Design Preview Ahead Of US Launch

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Honda has big ambitions for the Prologue, though we’ve expressed skepticism about the automaker’s projected sales targets in the past. Since then, of course, the world has changed considerable. The global fuel crisis — led in no small part by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine — has seen prices spike worldwide, and the car market could have taken on a much different shape by the time Honda’s EV finally hits the ground in 2024. As reported by The Washington Post on May 18, 2022, United States Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen stated that the cost of gasoline has increased by $4 across the country, and there’s no expectation for that to change any time soon.

That requires actually building EVs to meet demand, however, something every automaker has experienced issues with in the past few years. The impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on global supply chains has been considerable, and shows no signs of alleviating any time soon. Honda may have plenty of demand for the 2024 Prologue, then, but whether it can actually meet that remains uncertain. 

At least the dealerships themselves should be ready for the EV future, even if production lines aren’t necessarily at capacity. The early designs for the modular, charging station-equipped locations show a layout that Honda claims will scale according to the total number of EVs it actually sells. The automaker plans to roll out 30 different EV models by 2030, using not only Ultium but its own Honda e:Architecture, at which point it also expects to have sold a whopping 500,000 EVs overall.

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The Real Reason Michael Burry Bet Millions Against Apple

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Wright explains that Buffett is a long-term investor while Burry shorts stock on short-term plays. Buffett is not in the business of predicting company stock prices but invests in companies that he believes have business value down the road. Burry, on the other hand, is looking at what Apple stocks will do in the near future. Inflation, supply chain issues complicating the technology sector, China’s COVID-19 lockdowns, and the performance of NASDAQ are bound to affect Apple stock in the short term.

Burry has been open about his vision of the market, assuring that “the greatest speculative bubble of all time in all things” is inevitably leading to the “mother of all crashes” with investors piling up on cryptocurrencies (via Business Insider). Burry’s put options on Apple stocks give him the right (but not the obligation) to sell shares at a certain price, at a certain time. “If Apple doesn’t fall beneath a certain price by that time, the put options would expire worthless,” Billy Duberstein explains in a separate post for Fool.

Benzinga adds that Burry’s bearish position is valued at around $36 million if he exercises it. It is the largest position in his portfolio. Apple stock had a big run, quadrupling its stock price since early 2019. However, by May 2022, Apple stocks are down 20% year-to-date. The company from Cupertino saw a 16% drop in the stock price in this past quarter alone. Burry’s portfolio reveals his confidence in the U.S. market. He slashed it from 20 holdings to just six in the third quarter of 2021, with a value that dropped from $140 million to $42 million. In the fourth quarter, he swapped three of his remaining six holdings, lifting his portfolio to $74 million. “Short sellers on a stock have nothing, zero, zilch, nada, to do with the success or failure of the underlying business,” Burry tweeted on April 27.

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