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LEGO Education Spike Prime: Resources and a glorious new brick [UPDATE]

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There’s a new brick (actually several new parts, but one key brick) in the new LEGO Eductation SPIKE Prime set. The LEGO Education SPIKE Prime Set was released today as the 2020/2021 school season begins, ready to roll for STEAM, coding, and all sorts of LEGO robot adventures. And there’ll be new LEGO elements! The brick I’m most excited about here is the “Integrator Brick” (with cross axle). UPDATE: New resources were launched for educators and parents for students this season!

UPDATE: New training lessons for schools will appear at LEGO Education for the fall season. This will include a brand new new SPIKE Prime Training Trackers unit, too! If you’re an Educator or a Parent facilitating a student from home, take a peek at the new class management portal at LEGO, too. The original article continues below:

The LEGO Education Spike Prime Set was made for 2 student teams, includes 528 bricks, and is the most updated, ready to roll, powerful STEAM learning tool in the LEGO universe. It was made for grade 6-8 students and includes pathways to understanding text-based coding with Python. Also you can make it dance.

In the set you’ll find plenty of new elements, including new sizes for Technic Frames, a new Wheel Design, a new Ball and Castor, a “Biscuit”, a new “wire Clip”, a Technic Base Plate, and a slightly modified GEAR!

We’ve seen bricks LIKE this Integrator Brick before. There have been pretenders to the throne. But this looks a whole lot like it might be my new favorite. I’ll be using this for some really weird stuff, believe you me.

The rest of the stuff in the set can be seen in the video below. It’s going to be pretty radical!

If you’re planning on picking up the LEGO Education SPIKE Prime Set, you’ll be dropping $329.95 right out the gate. This set is meant for students, which means you might very well be an educator if you’re reading about the set in the first place. The pricing of the set is such that it COULD be for an everyday average consumer, or a parent, etc., but it’s meant for schools to utilize as a tool, too.

There’s also an Expansion Set for $99.95 with a whole bunch of extra pieces and a few connectors. There’s a standalone LEGO Technic Large Angular Motor for $34.95, a LEGO Technic Color Sensor for $23.95, and a LEGO Technic Large Hub for Spike Prime for $247.95.

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Realme’s Next Premium Tablet Looks To Have An Unusual Design

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Even though we still have six days before the Realme Pad X launches in China, some of the specs of the Realme Pad X have already been confirmed by Realme’s CMO Xu Qi Chase, GSMArena claims. We know that this mid-range tablet will get the Qualcomm Snapdragon 870 chipset. This also means that the Realme Pad X will become the first Realme tablet to feature 5G connectivity. While the CMO did not reveal the rest of the specs, there’s been rumors about the likelihood of the Realme Pad fetting a QHD+ display that could also support a 120 Hz refresh rate.

From the images, it is also evident that the Realme Pad X gets a single rear-facing camera that is situated on an unusually large camera bump. There is a smaller circle below the rear camera with a prominent “AI” logo. The tablet also skips an LED flash for low-light situations.

Designwise, the Realme Pad looks like a contemporary tablet with small bezels and flat sides. One of the invites also showcases the Realme Pad X being used with a stylus. It remains to be seen if this accessory will be part of the retail package or an optional extra. With the launch date for this product a week away, there is a good chance that we could have additional details about the Realme Pad X before the official launch.

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Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 Revealed As The Heart Of Your Next Android Flagship Phone

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Qualcomm’s latest flagship processor continues to be based on a 4nm manufacturing process — albeit this time from TSMC. This change has allowed Qualcomm to increase the GPU and CPU clock speeds by up to 7%. The result is that the Prime Cortex X2 is now clocked at 3.2 GHz (as opposed to 3 GHz on the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1). Similarly, the 3x Cortex A710 core now clocks at 2.8 GHz (compared to 2.5 GHz earlier).

Then we have the 4x Cortex A-510 efficiency cores that also see a jump from 1.8 GHz to 2 GHz. While Qualcomm is yet to reveal the clock speeds for the Adreno GPU on the Snapdragon 8+ Gen1, they already claim a 10% higher clock speed in the promotional materials.

The rest of the hardware on the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 is similar to that of its predecessor — and this includes the X65 integrated modem as well. The new chip continues to support 3200 MHz LPDDR5 RAM, and the ISP used is the same, with support for 200 MP resolution, 8K video capture, and 64 MP burst capture. In terms of encoding, the chip retains support for Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HDR10, and HLG. A glaring omission, this time around too, is the lack of support for the AV1 codec.

In simpler terms, apart from the faster performance on account of the supposedly better manufacturing process, the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 does not add anything over its predecessor in terms of additional features.

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Why Black Holes Slow Down Time As You Get Closer To One

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To understand why time slows down as an object gets closer to a black hole, it is necessary to understand what time dilation is. Live Science explains that Einstein — obsessed with space and time — was the first to realize that time was relative. After more than a decade of work, Einstein published his general theory of relativity in 1915, shocking the Newtonian establishment and revolutionizing science. Einstein argued that while the laws of physics are constant throughout the universe (via The Conversation), speed or motion, space, and time are not constant but relative. Relative to what? To the point of observation or observer.

Einstein often spoke about trains and how people on and off moving trains would perceive time and speed differently. He cited, for example, that a speeding train would move much faster for a person standing on the side of the track than for a person chasing the train on another train running parallel to it. This has fueled a range of wild experiments with clocks and atomic clocks, and the answers proved Einstein was right: time is not constant and it can dilate.

But to be scientifically accurate, time does not change because of where an observer may be; it changes due to changes in gravity. Scientists have proven these changes in time by measuring atomic clocks on top of buildings and on ground levels, or on orbiting satellites and on Earth. So, if gravity can change time, what would happen to time in the presence of the massive gravitational forces of a black hole?

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