Connect with us

Tech News

LG Wing rotating second screen is shaping up to be quite interesting

Published

on

Although it seems to have trouble selling its phones, LG arguably has no qualms taking risks in making very interesting ones. From the curved LG G Flex “banana phone” to the modular LG G5 to the recent generation of dual screen cases, the company has admittedly released impressive phones in the past years. It seems that LG will be at it again with the rather odd “LG Wing” and recent leaks are painting a picture of an eccentric phone that might actually be interesting and, more importantly, affordable.

It’s easy enough to make fun of the idea of a second square screen swiveling from beneath the main, full-length one. It’s is probably because it’s a bit inconceivable what you’d do with a second screen that’s only half the size of your phone. Fortunately, there are videos that give ideas on exactly that.

The first exclusive leaked video, courtesy of Android Authority, showed how the LG Wing would allow for running two apps at once, which is probably the main use case for this design. A new video clip, however, also suggests that the second screen could be used as an extension for the same app, for displaying maps or even stats in a game.

Of course, this would suggest that the app or game supports such a setup and Android apps, by default, don’t. As with LG’s Dual Screen cases, it requires that app developers take the extra steps to add support for utilizing a second display. And developers’ motivation will closely be tied on whether the volume of sales of a particularly unique device will be worth that extra work.

If the rumored US pricing for the LG Wing is on the mark, it could be an easy buy at around $1,000. That would suggest, however, that the phone will have less than premium specs, at least if the $600 LG Velvet is any indicator. That said, Korean media do report that the LG Wing will be one of the company’s most expensive, priced at around 1.9 million KRW (roughly $1,600), making it a more difficult sell in that case.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Realme’s Next Premium Tablet Looks To Have An Unusual Design

Published

on

Even though we still have six days before the Realme Pad X launches in China, some of the specs of the Realme Pad X have already been confirmed by Realme’s CMO Xu Qi Chase, GSMArena claims. We know that this mid-range tablet will get the Qualcomm Snapdragon 870 chipset. This also means that the Realme Pad X will become the first Realme tablet to feature 5G connectivity. While the CMO did not reveal the rest of the specs, there’s been rumors about the likelihood of the Realme Pad fetting a QHD+ display that could also support a 120 Hz refresh rate.

From the images, it is also evident that the Realme Pad X gets a single rear-facing camera that is situated on an unusually large camera bump. There is a smaller circle below the rear camera with a prominent “AI” logo. The tablet also skips an LED flash for low-light situations.

Designwise, the Realme Pad looks like a contemporary tablet with small bezels and flat sides. One of the invites also showcases the Realme Pad X being used with a stylus. It remains to be seen if this accessory will be part of the retail package or an optional extra. With the launch date for this product a week away, there is a good chance that we could have additional details about the Realme Pad X before the official launch.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 Revealed As The Heart Of Your Next Android Flagship Phone

Published

on

Qualcomm’s latest flagship processor continues to be based on a 4nm manufacturing process — albeit this time from TSMC. This change has allowed Qualcomm to increase the GPU and CPU clock speeds by up to 7%. The result is that the Prime Cortex X2 is now clocked at 3.2 GHz (as opposed to 3 GHz on the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1). Similarly, the 3x Cortex A710 core now clocks at 2.8 GHz (compared to 2.5 GHz earlier).

Then we have the 4x Cortex A-510 efficiency cores that also see a jump from 1.8 GHz to 2 GHz. While Qualcomm is yet to reveal the clock speeds for the Adreno GPU on the Snapdragon 8+ Gen1, they already claim a 10% higher clock speed in the promotional materials.

The rest of the hardware on the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 is similar to that of its predecessor — and this includes the X65 integrated modem as well. The new chip continues to support 3200 MHz LPDDR5 RAM, and the ISP used is the same, with support for 200 MP resolution, 8K video capture, and 64 MP burst capture. In terms of encoding, the chip retains support for Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HDR10, and HLG. A glaring omission, this time around too, is the lack of support for the AV1 codec.

In simpler terms, apart from the faster performance on account of the supposedly better manufacturing process, the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 does not add anything over its predecessor in terms of additional features.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Why Black Holes Slow Down Time As You Get Closer To One

Published

on

To understand why time slows down as an object gets closer to a black hole, it is necessary to understand what time dilation is. Live Science explains that Einstein — obsessed with space and time — was the first to realize that time was relative. After more than a decade of work, Einstein published his general theory of relativity in 1915, shocking the Newtonian establishment and revolutionizing science. Einstein argued that while the laws of physics are constant throughout the universe (via The Conversation), speed or motion, space, and time are not constant but relative. Relative to what? To the point of observation or observer.

Einstein often spoke about trains and how people on and off moving trains would perceive time and speed differently. He cited, for example, that a speeding train would move much faster for a person standing on the side of the track than for a person chasing the train on another train running parallel to it. This has fueled a range of wild experiments with clocks and atomic clocks, and the answers proved Einstein was right: time is not constant and it can dilate.

But to be scientifically accurate, time does not change because of where an observer may be; it changes due to changes in gravity. Scientists have proven these changes in time by measuring atomic clocks on top of buildings and on ground levels, or on orbiting satellites and on Earth. So, if gravity can change time, what would happen to time in the presence of the massive gravitational forces of a black hole?

Continue Reading

Trending