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Lylux cordless and bladeless hair dryer review

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We’re seeing a steady stream of new products for personal and home use that all use the “smart” qualifier to indicate how intelligent they are because they connect to the Internet. Things don’t have to be connected, however, to be useful. Sometimes, all it takes is the intelligent and creative combination of modern technologies to provide a more convenient and safer experience. That’s the simple joy that the Lylux Hair Dryer is promising by putting together bladeless fans, cordless operation, and smart sensors to make drying hair even less of a hassle.

Design and Safety

A lot of things are going wireless these days but that doesn’t mean you need to connect to some wireless network to be useful. Even the simple case of removing a power cord from the equation already has a massive implication in terms of convenience and safety.

Ditching the cord frees users not only to move around but also bring the Lylus hair dryer where it’s needed. More than that, however, it also removes the dangers of kids and animals tripping over cords, potentially injuring themselves or damaging the dryer.

It doesn’t without costs, though. Since the power that drives the Lylux comes from the built-in rechargeable battery, that also means that the hair dryer is heavier than conventional dryers. And while the dyer itself is cordless, its charging base isn’t and you’ll need to bring that along with you on long journeys away from home.

The Lylux’s safety doesn’t just come from having no cords, though. By also throwing out blades, Lylux also completely removes the risk of hair getting caught inside. It also uses some other smart (not connected) design elements, like a smoothing nozzle that magnetically attaches to the dryer with a satisfying click.

Performance and Battery

All of that design savvy and modern tech features would be for naught if the Lylux couldn’t perform just as well or even better than conventional hair dryers. The good news is that it definitely delivers on most of its promises. That said, it might also take some adjusting to the way it does things compared to your run of the mill equipment.

Boasting of a motor that runs at 100,000 rpm, the Lylux is definitely very strong. It can pump out air efficiently and, thanks to three speed settings and two temperature options (hot or cold), you can choose the strength that you want. The magnetic nozzle also lets you direct that airflow towards a more concentrated area if needed.

Air strength, however, is only part of what speeds up drying. Heat also plays an important role and this is where things can get a bit debatable. The Lylux doesn’t get as hot as other hair dryers and that’s actually by design. It boasts of an “intelligent sensor” for temperature control that caps the heat to 104° F (40° C) that may just be a bit below what some might be used to.

Lylux’s designers argue, however, that drying hair at higher temperatures ends up actually damaging it in the process. With heat and at max speed, it takes 40 minutes to dry long hair. Of course, it takes longer, around 50 minutes, to do the same without heat and at that same speed.

There’s also the probability that Lylux opted for a more moderate temperature cap to squeeze out as much use that it can from the 54Wh battery. Eventually, however, you will need to recharge it on its stand for about an hour to get it to full. It’s another lifestyle change that owners will need to get used to, lest they realize during the morning rush that their trusty dryer is dry out of power.

Wrap-up

Some things don’t need to be too complicated or too advanced to become convenient and useful. Sometimes, all it takes is the ingenious combination of already established and well-tested technologies to turn an old idea into a modern convenience. The Lylux hair dryer is testament to that line of thinking, stringing together small innovations to create a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts.

The Lylux cordless hair dryer is currently on Kickstarter where it just blasted through its modest funding goal in less than a day.

Early birds can try to grab one for a Kickstarter special of $169 if they’re fast enough. The product is expected to go on retail with a $298 price tag after the crowdfunding campaign.

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Bose SoundControl Hearing Aids don’t need a prescription

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As always, it seems that technological innovations are coming full circle. The quality and conveniences of wireless audio made their way from earphones to hearing aids a few years back and now advancements in ear care are coming to consumer audio accessories. Bose, a name renowned for its audio technology, is taking advantage of that cycle and is launching the SoundControl Hearing Aid, its first stab at such a product but one that doesn’t need a doctor’s appointment to acquire.

There have been a handful of new devices that have come up in the past two or so years that aim to revolutionize the hearing aid market. Many of these seem to have taken cues from modern wireless earbuds in terms of the conveniences offered by smartphones, Bluetooth audio, and the like. One thing that these hearing aids have over your consumer wireless earbuds is the accuracy and personalization of settings to each person’s unique hearing profiles, something that Bose is now trying to address.

These hearing aids are, of course, considered medical devices more than consumer products and their precision and advanced features come at more than the cost of the device itself. They often need a doctor’s prescription or at least a checkup, something that is more than just inconvenient these days. Some hearing aid companies have started to adopt remote or virtual doctor’s appointments but Bose does away with even that.

That’s what makes the Bose SoundControl Hearing Aids special because they have been FDA-approved to be sold directly to consumers, no need for professional advice. That said, Bose’s Hear app, designed especially for this device, does offer the opportunity to have a one-on-one appointment with product experts for free. Given the price tag of this thing, it’s not exactly too generous an offer.

The Bose SoundControl Hearing Aids are lightweight and practically invisible, with the main electronics hiding behind your ears, out of sight. In just 30 minutes, you can set up your personal settings in the Bose Hear app without fiddling with confusing controls or even asking a doctor. Users will also be able to choose between Focusing on certain voices or letting sound in from Everywhere. A pair does cost a hefty $850, though, but it might still be a fraction of the total expenses for a formal hearing aid, not to mention a doctor’s fee.

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OnePlus 7 and 7T Android 11 update is reportedly very buggy

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OnePlus has been making great strides and making big promises regarding its Android updates but it might need a bit more work when it comes to the quality of those updates. Though fortunately not the norm, OnePlus has been known to have pushed updates with rather notable issues, some of them worse than others. That is the unfortunate experience that OnePlus 7 and OnePlus 7T owners are reportedly having after the Android 11 and OxygenOS 11 upgrade brought not only new features but also bugs that remain unfixed more than a month later.

OnePlus has had rather problematic upgrades but it seems that the OxygenOS 11 update, which also brings Android 11, is taking the cake. There have been reports about problems with the latest update across many of OnePlus’ phones, including the OnePlus Nord, but owners of the company’s 2019 models are the ones that seem to have gotten the short end of the stick.

A growing number of complaints on Reddit as well as OnePlus’s own forums reveal the rather unfavorable situation regarding the update. Those complaints are all over the place, from greater battery drain to dropped frames that could affect mobile gaming. There are also worrying reports of overheating, at least more than usual, which could raise red flags when it comes to safety.

Given the wide range of issues, there is no single known source of the problem other than the Android 11 update. Of course, other phones on Android 11 don’t report such problems and OnePlus users are quick to blame OxygenOS 11 as the real culprit. It doesn’t help that this version of OnePlus’s custom Android experience isn’t exactly that popular because of the heavy changes that the company made.

OnePlus already pushed a minor update to these phones but it doesn’t seem to have addressed the problems to users’ satisfaction. Unfortunately, the only way to get around the problem is to downgrade back to Android 10, which is also impractical for many OnePlus 7 and 7T owners.

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Windows Holographic 21H1 update brings major new features to HoloLens

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Windows 10’s first major feature update of the year is already being prepared for rollout but it seems that the HoloLens 2 is getting dibs on its own major update before PCs. In fact, this update might be even more feature-packed than Windows 10’s May 2021 update itself. Windows Holographic version 21H1 is now available for download and it finally brings Microsoft’s better version of its Edge web browser, the one based on Google Chromium, of course.

Microsoft has been pushing its Chromium-based Edge rather aggressively wherever it can, replacing the old edgeHTML version as if it never existed. It isn’t just on PCs, of course, and even its mixed reality platform is getting the new Microsoft Edge web browser. And it isn’t just about having a shiny, modern web browser either.

The new Edge also enables WebXR experiences that the older web engine couldn’t support. Perhaps more importantly, it also allows PWAs or Progressive Web Apps to be installed alongside proper Windows apps from the Microsoft Store. Microsoft has also been pushing these web apps hard in an attempt to fill in the gaps left by its UWP platform.

Windows Holographic version 21H1 also pushes some changes to the operating system’s settings UI. One very notable change is the power menu that now behaves and looks more similar to the ones you see in Windows 10 on desktops. That includes the orange dots that indicate an update will occur when you restart or shut down the device.

The upgrade also makes handling multiple users less painful, now showing a list of users on the login screen to save you from typing user names over and over again. For devices in Kiosk mode, visitors can also be automatically logged in, though that default behavior can also be turned off by the device administrator. Windows Holographic 21H1 is available for the HoloLens 2 and also marks the end of support for the old version 1903 from two years ago.

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