Connect with us

Cars

Majesti-Fi Smart and Premium, First Take: Mobile wi-fi hotspots for business travellers Review

Published

on

Mobile wi-fi hotspots are a popular option with many business travellers, allowing them to use a mobile network to provide a secure wi-fi connection away from the office, rather than relying on unprotected public wi-fi.

Most of these devices are designed for personal use, often provided by mobile networks with a SIM and a contract along with the user’s smartphone. In contrast, the modestly named Majesti-Fi hotspot devices are very much aimed at business users and, following their launch in South Africa, are now available in the UK as well.

The developer, Majestic Ventures, currently offers two hotspot devices. The Majesti-Fi Premium is a slimline device that can easily be slipped into a jacket pocket, while the larger Majesti-Fi Smart has a screen that makes it easier to monitor data usage and network performance. The current version of the Majesti-Fi Smart also functions as a rechargeable battery pack, although that function will be dropped from the new model that’s planned for release in coming weeks, in order to reduce the size of the device.

Both Majesti-Fi devices provide 4G LTE Pro Plus mobile connectivity with 256-bit encryption, and allow you to use either a standard SIM card or the company’s own ‘virtual SIM’ software. Those features are fairly standard for mobile hotspot devices, but it’s the network service they provide that sets them apart from their more consumer-oriented rivals.

Majesti-Fi Smart

majesti-fi-premium-table.jpg

Majesti-Fi Premium

LCD screen

4-inch

no

Battery capacity

6,000mAh

3,500mAh

Battery life

15 hours

13 hours

SIMs

2 x Nano SIM

2 x Nano SIM

Max. download data rate

150Mbps

150Mbps

Max. upload data rate

50Mbps

50Mbps

Weight

240g

151g

Business customers can take out a contract with Majestic Ventures itself, rather than a standard contract with a single existing mobile network. However, Majestic has negotiated deals with more than 300 networks in 140 countries, allowing it to provide a reliable roaming service all around the world. Upon arrival in a new country, the Majesti-Fi device will automatically connect to whichever network provides the strongest signal, but can also switch to other networks as you roam, in order to continually select the best signal it can find.

SEE: Sensor’d enterprise: IoT, ML, and big data (ZDNet special report) | Download the report as a PDF (TechRepublic)

Top ZDNET Reviews

There are a number of pricing and data plans available for the Majesti-Fi devices. For light use, or for a device that’s shared by several members of staff, you can buy a single Majesti-Fi hotspot device for £129 (ex. VAT; £154.80 inc. VAT). This option allows you to choose several PAYG payment plans, such as a 7-day plan with 1GB of data for £14 ex. VAT; £16.80 inc. VAT). You can spread that 1GB over a month for £42 ex. VAT; £50.40 inc. VAT), going up to £155 ex. VAT; £186 inc. VAT) for 5GB per month.

Corporate customers who buy multiple devices get a better deal, with the Majesti-Fi devices discounted to £120 ex. VAT; £144 inc. VAT) each. Regular travellers who are prepared to commit to a 12-month contract get a better deal as well, with 1GB per month costing £35 ex. VAT; £42 inc. VAT). If you need more than 1GB data per month, then the cost simply rises on a flat rate of £35 (ex. VAT) per gigabyte.

The only minor oddity is that there’s no mobile app to control features, such as providing temporary ‘guest’ access to a new user or device while you’re travelling. It is possible to configure network settings such as this via a web browser interface, although that won’t be very intuitive for non-technical users, and Majestic does assume that each device will be set up and configured by the in-house IT department before you leave the office.

Even so, the worldwide coverage and secure, reliable connectivity that the Majesti-Fi devices offer could prove a very worthwhile investment for frequent travellers who need to use a lot of data on the road.

RECENT AND RELATED CONTENT

Enterprises lax about mobile security as more threats loom
Verizon’s Mobile Security Index for 2019 has more than a few findings enterprises should be worried about.

The 10 best smartphones you can buy right now
It’s easy to find a great phone today. In fact, current flagship devices are so good you really don’t need to be replacing them every year.

5G, Wi-Fi 6, and nano-satellites: Cisco pushes total coverage
5G is not the be all and end all, Cisco has said, with Wi-Fi 6 needed to enable indoor coverage and nano-satellites necessary for ensuring the entire world is connected.

First look: Zendure X6 power bank with built-in USB hub
While this isn’t a power bank that you can easily slip into a pocket, it’s packed with powerful features that make it very compelling.

Smartphone out of juice? Check out the Electjet Apollo Traveller power bank (TechRepublic)
The Apollo Traveller by Elecject might be for you if you need a smartphone power bank to keep your device charged while on the go.

Wi-Fi 6 explained: Everything you need to know about the Galaxy S10’s new wireless tech (CNET)
Here’s how this bleeding-edge, ultrafast wireless tech differs from Wi-Fi 4 and Wi-Fi 5.

Read more reviews

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cars

Tesla Set To Deliver The First Semi To Pepsi

Published

on

In October, Tesla’s CEO revealed that the production of the Tesla Semi had begun, and it was bound to be delivered today. Tesla has already started the countdown, and we expect the unveiling event to go down at the Nevada factory. The electric truck will be dispatched to Pepsi, which had ordered 100 units. Investor reports that Tesla’s stock price increased by 7.7% on Wednesday, probably in anticipation of Tesla’s Semi first delivery.

Musk tweeted on Saturday that the “Tesla team just completed a 500-mile drive with a Tesla Semi weighing in at 81,000 lbs!” However, considering that Musk said that the company is dealing with supply chain issues and market inflation, it’s unclear if Tesla will stick to the original $180,000 price it intended to sell at when it was announced in 2017. Then again, Tesla offers a cheaper Semi that will be available for about $150,000 — but it can only achieve up to 300 miles at full load capacity. For now, we can only wait until it’s on the road to confirm if the specs match up to what was promised five years ago.  

Continue Reading

Cars

Coinbase Joins Elon Musk In Slamming The Apple App Store Tax

Published

on

Coinbase complained that Apple’s insistence on its cut unreasonably interfered with its business.

Coinbase’s argument was largely the same as Elon Musk’s, and the basis of Epic Games’ aforementioned lawsuit. According to all of the above, Apple was half of a duopoly: with Google, it controlled the global app marketplace. The “duopoly” part of the argument is pretty much incontrovertible: As of October 2022, both Apple and Google control 99.43% of the global smartphone market between them (via StatCounter). Both get a 30% cut of everyone’s action on its marketplace. From the perspective of Coinbase, that took too much money out of too many elements of its business.

Epic sued over that and, as noted above, won with an asterisk. Apple had restricted in-app purchases, and courts found that anticompetitive, but did require that Apple get a 30% cut of the profits, even though they took place in someone else’s app. In short, according to the Verge, the court said that if you’ve found a way to make money using iOS, you owe Apple 30%, period.

Epic thought in-app purchases should be exempted from the tax. Coinbase thinks elements of the NFT development process — in this case, gas prices to run the processing equipment necessary to mint NFTs — should be exempt from Apple’s app tax. Apple treats all user expenses on an app as in-app purchases and, per the Epic court decision, in-app purchases mean Apple gets a cut.

It’s not a simple problem, and it’s not likely to be solved anytime soon. Stakeholders and regulators have barely begun to integrate cryptocurrency and NFTs into the conventional marketplace. Who gets paid for what is likely to be a conversation for years on end. For now, all that’s certain is that conversation has begun.

Continue Reading

Cars

LastPass Security Breach Exposed Some Customer Data, But Details Are Still Slim

Published

on

LastPass’ new blogpost continues to be vague about the nature of the latest security incident that has affected the platform. What it does reveal, however, is that the company recently detected yet another incident of “unusual activity” within a third-party cloud storage service connected to LastPass. LastPass stopped short of revealing details surrounding the affected third-party cloud service. However, TechCrunch has hinted at the possibility of the cloud service being AWS. For those unaware, starting in 2020, LastPass began using AWS (Amazon Web Services) to store more than a billion customer records on Amazon’s cloud.

LastPass goes on to add that the security incident prompted an immediate internal investigation, following which they ascertained that the threat actor was able to access “certain elements” of LastPass’ customer information. Interestingly, LastPass has also confirmed that the unauthorized party used data from the August 2022 incident to gain access to LastPass’ systems.

While LastPass hasn’t revealed the exact nature of customer information that has been breached, they maintain that customers’ passwords have not been affected. LastPass also said it had engaged the services of Mandiant — a leading security firm — to help them with the investigation. The company has also notified law enforcement agencies about the same. The company has promised to share more updates surrounding the latest incident after they conclude an internal investigation.

Continue Reading

Trending