Connect with us

Cars

MWC 2019: The Cisco and Nokia tech behind Rakuten’s mobile network

Published

on


(Image: Corinne Reichert/ZDNet)

Japanese online marketplace Rakuten has made the surprise announcement that it will be launching its own mobile network in just eight months, thanks to hardware and software from tech giants Cisco and Nokia.

The Rakuten Mobile Network, which will launch in October, will be the first fully virtualised, cloud-based mobile network in the world.

Speaking with ZDNet at Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2019 in Barcelona, Cisco global director of Mobility and 5G Bob Everson said the rollout will utilise his company’s virtualisation architecture.

“They have a really nice approach,” he said.

“It’s a greenfield build, it’s brand new, so they have the benefit of being able to decide how they want to do this from scratch, and so a very innovative approach where it’s all a completely virtualised, cloud-based network.”

Cisco, which also announced its Unified Domain Center (UDC) at MWC as “the bridge between DNA and mobile”, is lending its routing and switching hardware, software, and services across its cloud, IT, and service provider portfolios to the Rakuten build-out.

The networking giant is also providing its experts from engineering, security, operations, and multi-vendor systems integration.

Once deployed, the network will include a fully virtualised network with multi-access edge computing; software-defined networking; centralised and regional datacentre capabilities; and full service and infrastructure automation.

Rakuten Mobile Network CTO Tareq Amin said his company’s network will be “software powered and automated from top to bottom”.

“With this design approach we mapped out with Cisco and a careful selected vendor ecosystem, we believe we can offer high-value services at more affordable costs, helping our customers to share the true benefits of cloud innovation,” Amin said.

According to the Amin, this virtualised, cloud-based approach is going to save his company at least 35 percent in opex compared to traditional mobile carriers.

“Normally, RAN is somewhat of a monolithic system that’s deployed out there with the software and hardware integrated, and as we move towards virtualisation, the industry is refining a path to get there,” Everson explained.

“It’s a completely virtualised network based on Cisco telco cloud, Cisco orchestration.”

Read also: MWC 2019: Google Stati/on, Cisco team up for global connectivity initiative

Everson said that when Rakuten first announced its intentions to build a mobile network, many in the industry didn’t know it would work.

“Now what we’re showing is that all they have to have out at the cell site is basically the radio and the antenna equipment,” he said.

“None of the real processing happens there, and so all they need is a construction person to go out there, not the higher-level technician, but just the construction person to hang the antenna, plug it in, and it’s literally plug and play back to the network, so they plug that cable in, it goes back to the OSS and the OSS says, ‘I know you’, kicks off our orchestration system, which pushes the RAN software out to an edge cloud node — they have 4,000 edge cloud nodes, they’re all built on Cisco virtualisation technology  — pushes the software out there, brings up all the radio software, and connects to the antenna and fires up the network, and we actually have it doing it in a couple of minutes versus days of coordination.

“Rakuten is way beyond a proof of concept, it’s a real live network that they’re aggressively moving forward with.”

The mobile network will also be 5G ready, according to Cisco, with 5G-enabled IPv6 transport and mobile backhaul.

Nokia CTO: ‘Is the future of web-scales mobile networks?’

Nokia is providing the radio hardware as well as the end-to-end system integrator for Rakuten, Nokia CTO Marcus Weldon told ZDNet in an interview.

“Because they don’t have any cell sites of their own, they decided to go straight to a cloud-native RAN instead of going with the conventional one where you put the baseband at the bottom of the tower,” Weldon said.

“They lease tower space to put radios up and then backhaul, but they didn’t want to use the cabinet, the baseband, so they’ve gone for cloud native, which is a first.”

Nokia is also working with Rakuten on 5G, but he said it will all be LTE for now.

According to the CTO, the most interesting part of the Rakuten story is the transition of a web-scale company into the mobile network space.

“They’re in the radio business to allow them to complement their web platforms. So they’re a web-scale, but no web-scale has ever built a mobile network before,” he said.

“Is the future of web-scales building mobile networks? Rakuten is the first one that is a web-scale who’s building a mobile network.”

Related Coverage

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Cars

How To Build Your Own Retro Gaming Console With A Raspberry Pi

Published

on

Once your micro SD card is mounted with RetroPie, you can plug it into your fully assembled Raspberry Pi 4 and begin the setup process in the software menu that appears. Make sure your controller is nearby, as you’ll need it during the first boot process. If you’re using a USB controller, make sure it’s connected physically, then follow the instructions on-screen.

If you’re using a Bluetooth controller, tap F4 on your USB keyboard to exit back into the Linux command prompt screen, then type and execute the command “sudo ~/RetroPie-S etup/retropie-setup.sh” that loads you into a backend RetroPie menu. Navigate to the Bluetooth option and then open it to begin searching for a controller. Set your Bluetooth controller to sync mode, then pair it in the menu. Return to the Linux command prompt and type the command “sudo shutdown -r now”. Upon loading back into RetroPie, you should be able to use your Bluetooth controller by simply turning it on and following the on-screen menu. Once everything is complete, you’ll end up on another menu with the option RASPI-CONFIG, which you should now select.

Upon tapping that option, you’ll be taken to the main configuration menu for RetroPie, which includes all sorts of different settings. Go ahead and configure whichever settings you need. It’s also a good idea to navigate to Advanced Settings and disable Overscan if you’re using an HDTV. From here, you should be able to load your ROMs (stored on your SD card) and play them from the menu that appears when you boot up RetroPie. Check out the RetroPie documentation for troubleshooting any issues you may encounter, and happy gaming!

Continue Reading

Cars

Today’s Wordle Answer #377 – July 1, 2022 Word Solution And Hints

Published

on

The solution for the July 1, 2022, edition of Wordle is pinto. It made its way to the English vocabulary from the Spanish word pinto, which refers to a subject that is spotted or mottled. Horses with a patchy coloration, especially those rocking white patches, are affectionately known as pinto.

The word traces its etymological roots to the Latin term pinctus, which is used to describe something that has been painted over. The pinto bean, which is a staple in Mexican, Spanish, and Brazilian cuisines, also gets its name from the patchy color profile of its outer skin. According to Ancestry data, Pinto is a popular Catalan name that eventually made its way to the Indian subcontinent with the advent of Portuguese invaders.

Interestingly, it is also used to describe a person with greying hair, something pop culture describes as a salt-and-pepper look. You can trace the history of Pinto family migration across the U.S. and Canada in the 19th century here. As for famous personalities with that surname, the actress described above is Freida Pinto, while the footballer in question is José Manuel Pinto. Meanwhile, Fernão Mendes Pinto was a renowned Portuguese explorer and writer who also has a crater on the planet Mercury named after him.

Continue Reading

Cars

This New $6 Raspberry Pi Is The Computer The DIY Smart Home Needs

Published

on

In terms of hardware, the Raspberry Pi Pico W is identical to its predecessor; it sports the same RP2040 Arm Cortex M0+ Dual-Core SoC, which is based on TSMC’s 40nm low power manufacturing process. This chip clocks up to 133MHz and also packs in 264KB of SRAM. There is 2MB of onboard flash storage thrown in, as well. Additionally, the machine features a 40-pin GPIO just like the original Pico from 2021. The onboard micro USB controller can be used for data transfer and receiving power.

The Wi-Fi module on the Raspberry Pi Pico is the Infineon CYW43439 wireless that, apart from supporting 2.4GHz Wi-Fi networks, also adds Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low-Energy support. However, as of now, Raspberry has chosen not to enable Bluetooth capability in the machine. The company does not rule out the possibility of enabling Bluetooth further down the line, though.

With over 2 million Raspberry Pi Pico boards in the hands of consumers, the company expects its new model to enjoy similar success. The company also believes that the ongoing chip shortage has been among the prime reasons for the popularity of the RP2040-based Raspberry Pi Pico. The Pico W, thanks to its newfound wireless capability, will continue to be a great product that can power many IoT-based applications and DIY smart home needs. With a price tag of $6, the Raspberry Pi Pico W costs just $2 more than its predecessor. As the ecosystem for starter microcontrollers evolves, the $6 you spend on the Pico W will definitely be a worthwhile investment.

Continue Reading

Trending