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Netgear’s Meural Canvas II is a better version of the best home gadget for photographers – TechCrunch

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Netgear has released the first updated Canvas digital art from from Meural since acquiring the company last September, and the next-generation connected frame comes with some decent quality-of-life improvements as well as a new, additional size. It’s not a dramatic change from the original Meural Canvas, but it means that a product that was already great is now even better.

The Meural Canvas II from Netgear comes in two sizes, including a smaller 16×24-inch frame that provides a 21.5-inch diagonal picture (starting at $399.95), and a 19×29-inch frame with a 27-inch diagonal display (starting at $599.95). Both screens are 1080P full HD resolution, and both feature ambient light sensors (which are relocated to a better location under the mat that surrounds the screen for improved light detection) that will automatically adjust the brightness of your image to make it appear more natural and less like a screen.

The Canvas II features built-in Wi-Fi, which is also upgraded with this generation (Netgear, which makes routers and other Wi-Fi products, seems to have brought its expertise to bear here) and they offer new Ethernet connectivity, as well as full-size SD ports. They also can hang either vertically or horizontally, and a new accessory mount for this generation (sold separately) allows for even easier switching between the two orientations via simple rotation.

For the virtual art collector

Meural is controlled primarily from the Meural companion app, though you can also access a web interface to accomplish much of the same thing from a desktop browser. The app features curated collections of artwork, which is available both via a paid monthly subscription and via direct, one-time purchases. One of the changes that the Meural service has undergone is that the subscription membership now gets you some, but not all, of the art available — some premium content is still an additional charge. It’s definitely not as good from the user’s perspective as when everything was free once you’d paid the subscription fee, but paying monthly still nets you 20GB of cloud storage for uploading your own art, discounts on the stuff that is available for purchase and access to a much larger library than you get without any membership.

Subscriptions go for either $8.95 per month, or $69.95 per year, and they’re probably plenty to satisfy most casual art lovers who just want some recognizable or interesting works to adorn their walls, and want to be able to change that on a fairly regular basis. And when you use the art provided through Meural’s various collections, you can take a look at credits and descriptions right on the display — available quickly via a motion control swipe up gesture made possibly by the sensors built into the frame.

A note on those motion controls — they allow you to navigate between artwork, and even change playlists and access a menu of other options related to the frame. Basically, you wave your hand near the bottom of the Meural to make this work, and it’s great when it does work, but it definitely takes some learning to figure out how and where to swipe to make it reliably respond. It’s convenient that it’s an option, but controlling the display with the iOS or Android app is a lot more pleasant, generally speaking.

The built-in library that Meural provides is definitely a selling point, and Meural is regularly adding new art collections, both for paid purchases and to build out the library of those works available included in the subscription. It just added a bunch through a new partnership with Marvel, in fact, including movie posters from a long list of their cinematic universe releases.

For the amateur/enthusiast/pro photographer

The primary reason I think the Meural Canvas II is a fantastic product has very little to do with its subscription-based art collection, however. Instead, it’s all about the flexibility and convenience that the Canvas provides when it comes to displaying your own photos. It’s incredibly easy to upload your photos from your mobile device or your desktop, and you can organize them in playlists, add descriptions and titles, and crop them manually or have the frame crop them automatically to display in its 16×9 aspect ratio.

As a display for your own photos, the Meural Canvas II is hard to beat: It’s a lot more flexible and cost effective than getting high-quality prints made, as you can rotate them out as often as you feel like, and the display’s color rendering and matte finish, while obviously not as good as a professional photo print, is nonetheless very pleasing to the eye. When you take as many photos as we collectively do now, but seldom have anywhere to show them off, the Canvas provides the perfect opportunity to ensure they have a great place to shine at home.

The included SD card reader means it’s easy to load up images and put them on the Canvas locally, but I also found that uploading from whatever Wi-Fi-connected device I had access to around the house was easy and fast (again, seems like Netgear’s core expertise came into play here). The ability to quickly change the orientation, which is fast and simple even without the rotation mount accessory, is another big plus for your own photos, as it means you can show off both portraits and landscapes.

Oh, and the ability to load your own artwork isn’t limited to just your photography, of course — any image in a standard format, including animated GIFs, can work on the Meural, which means it’s really only limited by the scope of what’s available on the internet.

Bottom line

Between the frame options, which you can swap out for different color options eventually when they’re sold separately, and the ability to upload your own content to the Canvas, it’s easily the most customizable piece of home decor you can find right now. For some, opting to move up to something like Samsung’s The Frame TV might be a better option, but that’s much larger, much more expensive, much heavier for mounting and not as flexible when it comes to playlists and your own curation of art to display.

The Meural Canvas II provides largely the same visual experience as the generation it replaces, but the other improvements make this a much better product overall, with faster, more reliable Wi-Fi connectivity, improved motion controls, more flexible on-device storage and new mounting options. If you like some variety in your wall art, or you’ve just been trying to figure out how to do something interesting with all those pictures you take, the Meural Canvas II is a great option.



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Report: Windows 11 22H2 update will be released on September 20

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Enlarge / A selection of apps from the Microsoft Store.

Microsoft

Windows 11’s first major update, also called Windows 11 22H2, is due to be released to the public on September 20, according to separate reports from The Verge and Windows Central.

The update has been available in near-final form in Microsoft’s Windows Insider Preview channels since May, and we’ve already covered most of its major changes—Windows 11 22H2 will include a few new security features (and new default settings for existing features), a redesigned Task Manager, new touchscreen gestures and window management features, and tweaks for the Start menu and taskbar, among other things. It also continues to replace old bits of Windows 8- and 10-era UI (like the brightness and volume indicators) with rounded Windows 11-style versions, bringing more visual consistency to Windows PCs.

Like all major Windows updates, it likely won’t be offered to all current Windows 11 users on September 20. Microsoft usually sends the update to a small number of PCs first and gradually expands availability until all Windows 11 PCs have installed it. Users can manually install new updates by downloading an ISO or using the Windows 11 Installation Assistant from this page.

Microsoft’s update plans for Windows have changed a lot in the last year, and they’re reportedly still in a state of flux. The company said last year that Windows 11 would receive major updates once a year and that Windows 10 would move from its twice-a-year update model to the same once-per-year schedule. But even as the pace of major updates has officially slowed down, Microsoft has also made some changes to its development and release practices that allow it to roll out small- to medium-size changes at shorter intervals. In the 10 months since Windows 11 was released, we’ve gotten a long list of user interface tweaks, updates for a number of preinstalled first-party apps, and Android app support. Microsoft also reportedly plans to go back to releasing new numbered Windows versions every three years or so, although the company has neither confirmed nor denied this.

For Windows 10 users who can’t or don’t want to install Windows 11, Windows 10 is getting its own 22H2 update. Microsoft released a preview build for it late last month, but the company isn’t talking about what this update actually does. It’s not likely to include many big user-facing improvements.

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Pixel 6 owners who upgrade to Android 13 can never go back

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Android 13 is slowly rolling out to Pixel phones, but here’s something to consider when that update message finally pops up on your device: You can never go back.

Google is apparently changing the way Android updates are enforced on its latest devices. A new warning message on the Pixel Factory Image page says that the Pixel 6, 6 Pro, and 6a can never go back to older versions of Android once they update:

Anti-rollback was first introduced in Android 8 as a security feature. Google can patch all the exploits it wants, but security fixes are meaningless if an attacker can just roll back a device to a previous version that’s full of security holes. Rollback protection works by recording the newest installed version into tamper-evident storage that persists across device wipes, and now the system knows if it’s on an old version or not. Previously, this feature would just show a warning message on boot (and it looks like that will still happen on the Pixel 5 and lower), but now, Google plainly says of the Pixel 6, “You will not be able to flash older Android 12 builds.”

It’s not clear why only the Pixel 6 is affected by this change. If you don’t count Android 12L, this is the Pixel 6’s first major OS update. The three phones listed are also the only three phones that use Google’s first in-house SoC, the Google Tensor, so maybe the chip is flexing its muscles with new anti-downgrade capabilities.

This isn’t a big deal for most consumers, but in previous Android versions, it was nice to have an escape hatch if Google came out with a particularly buggy first release. If you frequently try out different software builds, this change will presumably mean that you can’t use any older third-party ROMs, either.

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Almost-certain Nest Wifi appears at FCC with Wi-Fi 6E on-board

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Enlarge / We can’t show you Google’s likely new Nest Wifi router because it’s confidential. But “white” and “spherical” are pretty good bets.

Google has a new device awaiting approval at the FCC, and all signs point to it being an updated Nest Wifi router that not only addresses the notable lack of Wi-Fi 6 on its last model but leapfrogs ahead to Wi-Fi 6E.

In FCC documents made available yesterday, Google asked the FCC to keep confidential its schematics and operational details, including an “Internal Proprietary Antenna Solution consisting of 6 antennas.” As pointed out by Android Police, the fillings also show support for the 6 GHz frequencies of Wi-Fi 6E. There are also the standard 2.4 and 5 GHz bands, Bluetooth Low-Energy, and the 2.4 GHz frequencies that smart home connection standard Thread relies upon.

The model number—A4R-G6ZUC—is akin to other Nest products, and 9to5Google says it has confirmed that this is the number for the next Nest Wifi router.

In late 2019, when Google skipped Wi-Fi 6 for Nest Wifi, citing (questionable) cost concerns, we noted that a Wi-Fi 6 router wouldn’t do much for a home mostly filled with Wi-Fi 5 and 4 (i.e., 802.11ac and 802.11n) devices. And yet, had Nest’s router and points used Wi-Fi 6, their ability to use this newly freed-up spectrum space to speak to newer devices—and especially for backhaul moving of traffic from node to node—could have benefitted homes full of noisy devices or those competing with close-by neighbors’ gear.

It’s the same story with Wi-Fi 6E. There’s a small list of devices using the relatively recent Wi-Fi 6E right now: the Pixel 6 and 6a, Samsung’s Galaxy S21 Ultra, some brand-new laptops (not including the latest MacBook Air), and any PC you upgrade yourself with a 6E card. Wi-Fi 6E also lets devices make use of the wider 80 and 160 MHz channels, opening up capacity and reducing interference.

Broadcom chart illustrating the difference between a noisy 5GHz channel and a clean 6GHz channel.
Enlarge / Broadcom chart illustrating the difference between a noisy 5GHz channel and a clean 6GHz channel.

Broadcom

It’s worth noting that this FCC filing is only for a Nest Wifi router. It remains to be seen whether Google will offer Nest hubs with built-in speakers, as with the previous Nest Wifi. One more notable improvement Google could latch onto new Nest hubs would be Ethernet ports, something painfully lacking from the current generation.

In our benchmark review of Nest Wifi, we were impressed with Nest’s coverage of a 3,500-square-foot, difficult-layout home but found lots of room for improvement. Given the other options available at the same price points, it seemed like an option best suited for those already enthusiastic about Google Assistant speakers.

By the time Nest Wifi arrives (likely at an October Google hardware event), there will probably be strong Wi-Fi 6E mesh competition. We’ll see if the product has the same value proposition then.

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