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New iPhone 12 mini leaked in name and size

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Today we’re taking a peek at the full October 2020 iPhone lineup from Apple, thanks to a series of leaks from a variety of sources. The iPhone 12 mini will be one of four devices, as best as we can tell so far, and it’ll feature a device size not seen from Apple for several generations. This so-called iPhone 12 mini is rumored to be a size roughly equivalent to that of the original iPhone 5 or iPhone SE!

As we explored a bit back in May, the smallest of the four new iPhones for 2020 could be smaller than the iPhone you’re holding right now. Smaller than the iPhone 6, 7, 8, smaller than X. This new device could earn its rumored “mini” name via MacRumors and the tweet below from L0vetodream with a body that’s not much larger than the iPhone first released in late 2013.

The full collection of new iPhone devices revealed in October of 2020 and released in late October or early November will likely go as follows: iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro, and iPhone 12 Pro Max.

SEE TOO: 12 things you should know about iPhone 12

The lesser two devices, iPhone 12 and 12 mini (not to be mistaken for the iPhone X DIY mini), will have very similar features save a slightly different display size. The Pro models will have advanced camera arrays and sensors and significantly higher prices. The size of the display of the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro will likely be the same – so it’ll be interesting to see how Apple makes their differences clear at a glance.

The iPhone 12 will likely be revealed on October 13, 2020 at a special virtual Apple event. It’ll have been a tough decision for Apple to hold this event virtually – like it was for the September event for the iPad and Apple Watch. But, given the high production value of the virtual streamed presentation VS the potential negative effects of an in-person press event, this might well be the way things go from now on.

It’s also possible that Apple will hold their special event on the 20th of October – Apple’s given no specific indication through official channels just yet. We’ll see soon enough!

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OnePlus 8T OxygenOS 11 adds the Amazon app nobody asked for

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OnePlus may have thankfully promised to stop preloading Facebook on its phones but it seems to have switched one Big Tech for another Big Tech. The OnePlus 8T, the company’s latest flagship announced just last week, is getting a minor update to OxygenOS 11 but instead of what should have been a trivial event in India has blown up over the Internet. It turns out, the update also adds the Amazon app to the phone but OnePlus apparently has a ready answer for that.

To be clear, the Amazon app is only being installed on Indian models of the OnePlus 8T, an important distinction in this context. It is, after all, Indian users who spotted the OxygenOS 11.0.1.2 changelog that mentions the addition of the Amazon app “for a better shopping experience”.

Given the recent promise from OnePlus not to pre-install Facebook and other bloatware anymore, this almost sneaky addition seems almost insulting. OnePlus’s explanation is that, at least in India, it has always pre-installed the Amazon app anyway so it’s nothing really new. What’s new is that it wasn’t actually able to pre-install the app from the get-go.

Speaking to Android Authority, OnePlus explained that it wasn’t able to install the Android 11 of the Amazon app in time for the OnePlus 8T’s launch. The update simply put back what should have been there in the first place, no harm, no foul. At least for OnePlus, that is.

Of course, the mere idea that OnePlus is still putting in bloatware, even if limited to a single market, is already ruffling a few feathers. Of course, it isn’t unusual for smartphone makers to partner with companies that get their apps preloaded, like Samsung and Microsoft, but OnePlus is often held to a higher standard than most OEMs.

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Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 comes in a more compact form

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The Raspberry Pi single-board computers or SBCs have long been the darling of makers and tinkerers because of their size and their price. The RPis, however, have also served as the foundation of more formal products that take advantage of the platform more than just the package. For these types of uses, The Raspberry Pi Foundations has provided smaller but also less featured Compute Modules and the latest version based on the RPi 4 shrinks that size down even further with one important consequence.

Calling these watered-down or dumbed-down versions of the Raspberry Pi 4 isn’t exactly fair. Yes, almost all the I/O components have been removed in order to compress the computer into the most compact form possible. Instead of being used out of the box as ready-to-use computers, however, compute modules are instead embedded in larger products, some of them commercially available, that have their own I/O systems anyway.

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 or RPi CM4 is built on the same platform as its namesake, which means using the 64-bit quad-core BCM2711. Like the RPi 4, buyers have a choice of 1, 2, 4, or even 8GB of RAM but, for the first time, there are also options of eMMC storage capacities at 8, 16, or 32GB. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are also optional.

Another thing that’s new in the CM4 is that the smaller than previous Compute Modules and therefore break compatibility with devices designed around older CMs. I/O signals are now delivered via two high-density perpendicular connectors, one used for power and low-speed interfaces while the other is for high-speed interfaces.

The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 now comes in 32 variants, starting at $25. For those who do need all the I/O connectors at least for testing, the Foundation is also selling a matching Compute Module 4 IO Board for $35, without the CM4.

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LG SIGNATURE OLED R Rollable TV is now available for purchase if you can

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While Samsung is lording it over its rivals when it comes to foldable phones, LG is taking its flexible displays where Samsung has not yet set foot in, at least not commercially. LG has been putting its own flexible OLED tech in computers and especially as rollable displays, including TVs. It showed off the latter last August and it is now finally ready to sell the LG Rollable SIGNATURE OLED R TV, at least those who can afford it in South Korea.

LG has long been playing with displays that can roll into view when needed and roll out of sight when not. Some of its iterations have focused on more industrial or commercial uses but it is also targeting the consumer electronics market with a rollable TV.

The SIGNATURE OLED R model RX rollable TV was first introduced to the public at CES 2019 and then again at SID 2020 last August and it is pretty much the culmination of the company’s years of R&D into this field. Unlike its previous displays, the OLED RX’s 65-inch flexible screen rolls up from a base that you put on the floor or some flat surface. That base itself is transparent at the bottom but has an opaque portion on the top half to hide the screen.

Aside from the rolling gimmick, the SIGNATURE OLED R TV also boasts of the usual features of high-end (read: expensive) TVs these days. Those include self-lighting pixel tech and individual dimming controls. LG doesn’t speak much about the TV’s other specs but it would be shocking if it isn’t at least UHD in resolution.

What it does talk about is the price. The LG SIGNATURE OLED R model RX rollable TV is available now in South Korea. But even if you did live there, the 100 million KRW, around $87,000 price tag, might leave your jaw on the floor for a while before you decide to move on to more practical investments.

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