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NNNCo deploys IoT network for cotton farmers

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(Image: NNNCo)

Australia’s cotton farmers will be gaining access to Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity, with Australia’s National Narrowband Network Company (NNNCo) to deploy a 3 million-hectare network during 2019.

The publicly available LoRaWAN network, being built in partnership with Goanna Ag, is aimed at enabling IoT-powered irrigation solutions for the cotton industry.

NNNCo will extend its existing LoRaWAN network to cover the area across the Murrumbidgee, Lachlan, Gwydir MacIntyre, Namoi, and Macquarie valleys, and the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area, with Goanna Ag funding the network through investment from Westpac and Graincorp Operations.

The network will provide data on soil moisture through the use of sensors including soil probes, rain gauges, local weather data, water and fuel tank monitors, and satellite imagery. This will enable better scheduling of irrigation, according to the companies.

The LoRaWAN network will enable this at a low cost compared to traditional cellular connectivity, Goanna Ag CEO Alicia Garden said.

“Every day that a cotton crop is under stress can cost a grower over AU$100 per hectare. We help growers schedule and apply just the right amount of water to use on crops at just the right time so they can optimise their performance and profit,” Garden said.

The first 100 gateways and 2,000 sensors will be deployed in cotton farms across New South Wales and Queensland this cotton season as part of Goanna Ag’s GoField and GoSense services. The company will also be offering data analytics.

“The network will significantly drive down the cost of connection for data communication and the cost of sensors using this technology,” NNNCo founder and CEO Rob Zagarella said.

“This will make the difference between isolated usage and widespread deployment of the sensors which will in turn provide more granular information and higher value to the industry.”

NNNCo in August also announced that it will be building out an IoT network for the City of Gold Coast covering more than 1,300 square kilometres, with plans to use the connectivity for digital water metering, waste management, and support for parks and fields.

“We’re developing a secure, scalable, commercial-grade IoT network that will enable infinite use cases by businesses, enterprise, and the council,” Gold Coast chief innovation and economy officer Ian Hatton said.

“We chose LoRaWAN technology because it supports large-scale deployments securely, reliably, and cost effectively. NNNCo have been engaged because of their proven ability to build the network and bring commercial solutions that have the potential to significantly add value to Gold Coast residents and businesses.”

NNNCo is similarly building out IoT networks across Newcastle and Lake Macquarie to enable smart city applications such as smart street lighting and water meters.

It has previously worked on IoT trials with Melbourne’s metropolitan water utilities to test coverage, data delivery, and battery life of digital water metering for City West Water, South East Water, and Yarra Valley Water.

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This Tesla Supercar Is The Future Of Electric Cars We Want Elon Musk To Build

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British concept artist Khyzyl Saleem took to Instagram and Facebook to reveal the Tesla Precept Concept, a Tesla supercar/hypercar in the eyes of an under-30 designer. More than just a flight of fancy, the design was Saleem’s final submission for his Meguiar’s art piece dubbed “Electrifying 2020,” and it looks brilliant.

Saleem took influence from modern hypercars like the Czinger 21C, Rimac Nevera, Lotus Evija, and the Porsche Mission R concept to finalize his creation. But in our eyes, the Tesla Precept more closely resembles the offspring of a first-gen Tesla Roadster and a McLaren supercar, particularly a 765LT. The front clip is a bit off with its intricate hood design, and the Tesla “mustache” grille looks like an afterthought, but the rear is not too bad. We fancy the recessed taillight and wing spoiler design, and that swooping design on the diffuser is fascinating.

The artist claims the design is a “super early and kinda rough version” that, given more time, would have been something more unique. Tesla’s incoming Roadster is not a bad-looking car, but the Precept Concept proves what could have been if Tesla designers had taken a swill of scotch before buttoning down for work.

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Indiana Is The First State To Sue TikTok Over Child Safety Worries

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To tech-savvy and/or historically informed readers, the widespread concern about TikTok in the U.S. might smack of earlier moral panics. As mental health nonprofit Take This reports, it’s a matter of record that social media, video and tabletop games, clothing choices, music genres, and virtually anything else enjoyed by the young have been excoriated by American elders on one moral basis or another.

At the same time, serious questions have been raised about the safety of TikTok as a platform. We’ve reported in the past about the successes and failures of TikTok’s content moderation, from its largely hands-off, algorithmic approach to managing content to the borderline unethical treatment experienced by the human moderators the platform does possess. Content capable of generating severe psychological trauma in adult professional content managers certainly shouldn’t be emerging in children’s feeds.

Moderation and data security are also inescapably entwined. Hands-off moderation doesn’t just threaten the possibility of traumatic content in users’ feeds; it allows for sharing media at least some users are likely to see as unethical if not illegal. Add that to the documented pressures that Chinese law puts on social media platforms and it starts to seem like the Indiana lawsuit, right or wrong, at least has some kind of grounding.

Still, TikTok has answered critics and survived plenty of tough talk from the previous presidential administration. Whether it can continue to do so will depend both on the commitment of the platform’s user base and its ability to adapt to the requirements of American law.

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How Fast Is The Electric Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Really?

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According to Livewire, the ONE has some impressive speed and acceleration numbers, going from 0-60 mph in just three seconds and topping out at 110 mph. Sure, 110 mph doesn’t seem awfully fast, but Harley-Davidson motorcycles were never known for being fast. According to testing by CycleWorld, the Livewire ONE lives up to its reputation, accelerating from 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds — a fraction of a second slower than the marketed number.

Interestingly, in terms of acceleration, the Livewire ONE is second only to the FXDR 114, which has a 0-60 mph time of only 2.5 seconds, according to Harley Davidson of Kingwood. Being quick off the line is par for the course for an electric motorcycle, though — there are no gears to cycle through, and electric motor torque is usually much higher at low RPM. The highest top speed for a production Harley-Davidson bike also goes to the FXDR 114, which tops out at a respectable 160 mph, according to Peterson’s Harley-Davidson. As far as the Livewire ONE’s 110 mph top speed, that’s par for the course for Harley-Davidson, with most everything except for the FXDR 114.

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