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NNNCo deploys IoT network for cotton farmers

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(Image: NNNCo)

Australia’s cotton farmers will be gaining access to Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity, with Australia’s National Narrowband Network Company (NNNCo) to deploy a 3 million-hectare network during 2019.

The publicly available LoRaWAN network, being built in partnership with Goanna Ag, is aimed at enabling IoT-powered irrigation solutions for the cotton industry.

NNNCo will extend its existing LoRaWAN network to cover the area across the Murrumbidgee, Lachlan, Gwydir MacIntyre, Namoi, and Macquarie valleys, and the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area, with Goanna Ag funding the network through investment from Westpac and Graincorp Operations.

The network will provide data on soil moisture through the use of sensors including soil probes, rain gauges, local weather data, water and fuel tank monitors, and satellite imagery. This will enable better scheduling of irrigation, according to the companies.

The LoRaWAN network will enable this at a low cost compared to traditional cellular connectivity, Goanna Ag CEO Alicia Garden said.

“Every day that a cotton crop is under stress can cost a grower over AU$100 per hectare. We help growers schedule and apply just the right amount of water to use on crops at just the right time so they can optimise their performance and profit,” Garden said.

The first 100 gateways and 2,000 sensors will be deployed in cotton farms across New South Wales and Queensland this cotton season as part of Goanna Ag’s GoField and GoSense services. The company will also be offering data analytics.

“The network will significantly drive down the cost of connection for data communication and the cost of sensors using this technology,” NNNCo founder and CEO Rob Zagarella said.

“This will make the difference between isolated usage and widespread deployment of the sensors which will in turn provide more granular information and higher value to the industry.”

NNNCo in August also announced that it will be building out an IoT network for the City of Gold Coast covering more than 1,300 square kilometres, with plans to use the connectivity for digital water metering, waste management, and support for parks and fields.

“We’re developing a secure, scalable, commercial-grade IoT network that will enable infinite use cases by businesses, enterprise, and the council,” Gold Coast chief innovation and economy officer Ian Hatton said.

“We chose LoRaWAN technology because it supports large-scale deployments securely, reliably, and cost effectively. NNNCo have been engaged because of their proven ability to build the network and bring commercial solutions that have the potential to significantly add value to Gold Coast residents and businesses.”

NNNCo is similarly building out IoT networks across Newcastle and Lake Macquarie to enable smart city applications such as smart street lighting and water meters.

It has previously worked on IoT trials with Melbourne’s metropolitan water utilities to test coverage, data delivery, and battery life of digital water metering for City West Water, South East Water, and Yarra Valley Water.

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How To Build Your Own Retro Gaming Console With A Raspberry Pi

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Once your micro SD card is mounted with RetroPie, you can plug it into your fully assembled Raspberry Pi 4 and begin the setup process in the software menu that appears. Make sure your controller is nearby, as you’ll need it during the first boot process. If you’re using a USB controller, make sure it’s connected physically, then follow the instructions on-screen.

If you’re using a Bluetooth controller, tap F4 on your USB keyboard to exit back into the Linux command prompt screen, then type and execute the command “sudo ~/RetroPie-S etup/retropie-setup.sh” that loads you into a backend RetroPie menu. Navigate to the Bluetooth option and then open it to begin searching for a controller. Set your Bluetooth controller to sync mode, then pair it in the menu. Return to the Linux command prompt and type the command “sudo shutdown -r now”. Upon loading back into RetroPie, you should be able to use your Bluetooth controller by simply turning it on and following the on-screen menu. Once everything is complete, you’ll end up on another menu with the option RASPI-CONFIG, which you should now select.

Upon tapping that option, you’ll be taken to the main configuration menu for RetroPie, which includes all sorts of different settings. Go ahead and configure whichever settings you need. It’s also a good idea to navigate to Advanced Settings and disable Overscan if you’re using an HDTV. From here, you should be able to load your ROMs (stored on your SD card) and play them from the menu that appears when you boot up RetroPie. Check out the RetroPie documentation for troubleshooting any issues you may encounter, and happy gaming!

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Today’s Wordle Answer #377 – July 1, 2022 Word Solution And Hints

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The solution for the July 1, 2022, edition of Wordle is pinto. It made its way to the English vocabulary from the Spanish word pinto, which refers to a subject that is spotted or mottled. Horses with a patchy coloration, especially those rocking white patches, are affectionately known as pinto.

The word traces its etymological roots to the Latin term pinctus, which is used to describe something that has been painted over. The pinto bean, which is a staple in Mexican, Spanish, and Brazilian cuisines, also gets its name from the patchy color profile of its outer skin. According to Ancestry data, Pinto is a popular Catalan name that eventually made its way to the Indian subcontinent with the advent of Portuguese invaders.

Interestingly, it is also used to describe a person with greying hair, something pop culture describes as a salt-and-pepper look. You can trace the history of Pinto family migration across the U.S. and Canada in the 19th century here. As for famous personalities with that surname, the actress described above is Freida Pinto, while the footballer in question is José Manuel Pinto. Meanwhile, Fernão Mendes Pinto was a renowned Portuguese explorer and writer who also has a crater on the planet Mercury named after him.

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This New $6 Raspberry Pi Is The Computer The DIY Smart Home Needs

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In terms of hardware, the Raspberry Pi Pico W is identical to its predecessor; it sports the same RP2040 Arm Cortex M0+ Dual-Core SoC, which is based on TSMC’s 40nm low power manufacturing process. This chip clocks up to 133MHz and also packs in 264KB of SRAM. There is 2MB of onboard flash storage thrown in, as well. Additionally, the machine features a 40-pin GPIO just like the original Pico from 2021. The onboard micro USB controller can be used for data transfer and receiving power.

The Wi-Fi module on the Raspberry Pi Pico is the Infineon CYW43439 wireless that, apart from supporting 2.4GHz Wi-Fi networks, also adds Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low-Energy support. However, as of now, Raspberry has chosen not to enable Bluetooth capability in the machine. The company does not rule out the possibility of enabling Bluetooth further down the line, though.

With over 2 million Raspberry Pi Pico boards in the hands of consumers, the company expects its new model to enjoy similar success. The company also believes that the ongoing chip shortage has been among the prime reasons for the popularity of the RP2040-based Raspberry Pi Pico. The Pico W, thanks to its newfound wireless capability, will continue to be a great product that can power many IoT-based applications and DIY smart home needs. With a price tag of $6, the Raspberry Pi Pico W costs just $2 more than its predecessor. As the ecosystem for starter microcontrollers evolves, the $6 you spend on the Pico W will definitely be a worthwhile investment.

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