Connect with us

Tech News

One extra week on early-bird pricing for Disrupt SF 2019 – TechCrunch

Published

on

Happy (almost) Labor Day to all the hardworking members of the early-startup community — entrepreneurs, founders, investors, engineers and everyone in between. We know how hard you work to build your dream, so we’re cutting you a break and extending our early-bird pricing on passes to Disrupt San Francisco 2019 through 11:59 p.m. (PST) on September 6. One extra week to save up to $1,300.

Don’t fritter away this absolute last opportunity to save big bucks on our flagship event, where you’ll find more than 10,000 attendees, 400 media outlets and a passel of eager investors. Get your early-bird tickets now.

Disrupt events always feature incredible speakers, and we’ve got an amazing agenda lined up for you this year. Let’s take a look at just some of the discussions and interviews you’ll enjoy over the course of three Disruptive days.

Reigniting the Space Race: Blue Origin CEO Bob Smith intends to return the U.S. to crewed spaceflight, with a goal of doing so this year with its first suborbital trips. Hopefully, we can also get Smith to tell us the ticket price for a trip, once it begins taking on paying customers.

Could the U.S. Government Be Your Next Investor: No founder likes dilution, which is why the U.S. government is becoming an increasingly popular source for early-stage, ambitious venture capital. Hear from Steve Isakowitz (The Aerospace Corporation) along with other VC leaders and founders who have navigated the process to discover your next source of non-dilutive capital.

How to Build a Sex Tech Startup: As the old adage goes, sex sells. Cyan Banister (Founders Fund), Cindy Gallop (MakeLoveNotPorn) and Lora Haddock (Lora DiCarlo) will discuss the opportunities — and challenges — of building a successful sex tech startup, and how to capitalize on a market that’s projected to be worth more than $123 billion by 2026.

The Grass Is Greener: The cannabis industry is projected to reach $50 billion in 10 years. Keith McCarty (Wayv) and Bharat Vasan (Pax Labs) represent two of the biggest names in the market. Hear the duo talk about an industry with undeniable potential, but plenty of red tape to deal with, too.

Quite the appetizer, no? Then there’s the big event that everyone wants to watch — Startup Battlefield. Which awesome startup will outshine the rest and take home $100,000?

Want to meet and greet even more top early-stage startups? Be sure to stop by Startup Alley and connect with the TC Top Picks — and hundreds of other cool startups. This year, our editors hand-picked 45 companies that represent the very best in their tech categories. Check the list of winners right here so you can see which ones you want to meet IRL.

Disrupt San Francisco 2019 takes place October 2-4. Enjoy your Labor Day weekend, but be sure to take advantage of the one-week early-bird price extension. Buy your passes to Disrupt SF and save up to $1,300 — but only if you beat the new deadline: September 6 at 11:59 p.m. (PST).

Is your company interested in sponsoring or exhibiting at Disrupt San Francisco 2019? Contact our sponsorship sales team by filling out this form.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Tech News

IKEA and Sonos’ picture frame speaker has one big problem

Published

on

Sonos and IKEA have returned with another surprisingly affordable speaker, but the SYMFONISK Picture Frame hides its music in plain sight. In the process it has added a new element of design to the partnership though, as excited as I am for more attainable connected speakers, I can’t help but feel that neither company has quite closed the loop on this third product.

I’m a big fan of Sonos and IKEA’s original SYMFONISK range, particularly the bookshelf speaker. At $99 it’s the most affordable speaker you can buy which will integrate with Sonos, and that opens up the door to expanding a Sonos system into rooms and spaces you might not otherwise have been able to justify. Home offices and kids bedrooms are good examples, but the affordable speaker also serves well as components for a rear surround sound system too.

Even when it launched the bookshelf and table lamp speakers, IKEA and Sonos weren’t coy in promising more from the SYMFONISK series. It was to be a long-term collaboration, the two companies insisted, leveraging the mass-market design chops of one with the tech-savvy of the other. We had to wait, of course, almost two years to see the third product arrive.

I’ll confess, I’m left scratching my head a little at the new SYMFONISK Picture Frame. Announced yesterday, it takes Sonos into a whole new form-factor compared to what the company is familiar with.

Sonos speakers aren’t exactly attention-grabbing, and Sonos Architectural installations can be positively surreptitious. However the new speaker for IKEA goes one step further, effectively hiding the audio side of things even as the SYMFONISK sits on the wall. Only the power cable really gives things away.

Speaker companies have tried flat speakers before, but never quite like this. IKEA’s contribution is, in no small part, the price tag. Yes, at $199 the picture frame is the most expensive of the SYMFONISK line-up so far, but it’s a far, far cry from the super-premium flat speakers we’ve seen attempted in the past. At 2.36-inches deep it’s not quite as slender as them, either, but I suspect the cost/thickness balance will be far more acceptable in terms of people opening their wallets.

What I struggle with, though, is the idea of it being a picture frame at all. More specifically, the fact that right now there’s no way to actually use your own art in there.

IKEA has designed it so that the picture pops out and can be replaced. The frame – in either black or white – is super-slim, to the point that you don’t really see it around the edge of the picture insert, but it means that you’ll be able to swap the default image for something new. That is, assuming IKEA has a design you like.

The two standard art pieces are the handiwork of European artist Jennifer Idrizi. They’re apparently inspired by visualizations of music and inter-connections, the result being an abstract interplay of lines that are more like a topographical network map than anything else. Neither is unpleasant, and you could easily picture them on the wall of a fancy apartment building’s show-suite.

At the same time, though, they’re hardly striking in an art sense. IKEA will have a couple of other designs, following on in August, and the retailer says that more versions will follow – and vary by geographic location – in due course. Much like the furniture company’s regular range evolves with the seasons, so too will SYMFONISK art, it seems.

What I’d really like, though, is the ability to put my own pictures in there instead. I doubt I’m alone in that. I suspect the challenge is that IKEA isn’t using paper or canvas for its art, instead relying on some sort of mesh that’s still acoustically transparent despite also showing Idrizi’s handiwork.

For now, Sonos tells me, there’s no provision for custom art for the SYMFONISK Picture Frame. That could change in the future, of course, and I really hope it does. The ability to upload a picture and have it reproduced on a speaker-compatible mesh seems like the sort of home decor idea people would love, and the Sonos audio side of that would be the gravy on top.

Honestly, I’m not sure SYMFONISK is going in the direction I – and others – expected it to. Sonos and IKEA’s plan to democratize music and design looked, initially, like a value play: the value that IKEA is already known for with so much of its range. However instead we’ve seen the attainable design side be emphasized, a reminder that part of IKEA’s charm has long been that it works with individual designers on products that are not only distinctive to look at but can be cost-effective to manufacture and ship at scale.

That’s arguably a far more exciting approach to the home audio category, and one I hope we don’t have to wait another two years to see the next installment in. More immediately, though, my fingers are crossed that Sonos and IKEA join up the dots on this new SYMFONISK offering, because while art is nice, art with personal meaning can be truly uplifting.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Here’s what the first Google Store is like on the inside

Published

on

The first Google Store is almost open, and if you can’t make it to New York City to check out the new brick & mortar shop, a virtual walk-around is the next best thing. Google announced earlier in the year that it would be opening its first physical location for device sales, and now it has opened its doors in Chelsea, NYC.

At first, it seems like a fairly odd decision given the events of the past 18 months. Online shopping has soared in popularity, as the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing have kept people at home and online.

Still, Google argues that it does make sense. “This new space will be a natural extension of our commitment to NYC and provide customers with hands-on interaction with our lineup of devices and services — from Pixel phones and Nest products to Fitbit wearables and Pixelbooks,” Ivy Ross, VP of hardware design, UX & research, and Nathan Allen, head of store design & special projects, insist. Part of that is a recognition that Google’s device range is now considerable, and that can be overwhelming to new users.

As a result, the new Google Store takes a more hands-on, exploratory approach. Google worked with NYC-based architect Reddymade, even building a full-scale mockup in Mountain View, CA, where it could play with the layout and figure out how to best demo both hardware – like Pixel and Nest – and software.

The end result isn’t just a retail location, but a way for Google to showcase some of the other elements which have become increasingly important in product design. That includes sustainability: both for the devices on sale, and for the store itself. The building is certified LEED Platinum by the US Green Building Council, for example, around sustainable choices for construction and materials.

“Every element of the Google Store — the materials, building processes, mechanical systems and more — was painstakingly considered and selected,” Ross and Allen explain. “For example, the veneer on the walls is a soft gray responsibly sourced hickory, each lighting fixture is energy efficient and our custom cork and wood furniture was created with a local craftsman from Greenpoint, Brooklyn. We even attached our carpeting (which was manufactured with recycled materials) in a sustainable way.”

Of course, that still left room for some more playful elements. The most conspicuous is the “Google Imagination Space”: a 17 foot tall circular glass structure filled with huge touchscreens that can be used to show off immersive demos. That’ll begin with Google Translate, which will do real-time translation across 24 different languages as visitors speak.

There’ll be specially-trained staff to give advice and do demos, and an opportunity to see all of the different color options of each product. Gamers will be able to try out Google Stadia, too, in a specially set-up game hall.

The Google Store is open from tomorrow, June 17, from 10am ET.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Honor 50 series launches with Google good news

Published

on

Honor has revealed its Honor 50 smartphones and, more importantly, that Google’s apps and services will be supported on the new handsets. The announcement today – which confirmed availability and pricing for the Honor 50 and Honor 50 Pro in China – came with the news that the former Huawei subsidiary has achieved its big goal in spinning out.

Honor began as Huawei’s focused brand on younger users, borrowing technology from its corporate parent but packaging it into a more affordable line-up. However when Huawei was placed on the US government’s entity list, blocking it from doing business with American firms, it left Honor also out of the loop for accessing Google apps and services.

That’s proved to be disastrous for Huawei, with its smartphone sales slumping dramatically. Honor, meanwhile, was spun out into its own, standalone business late last year. That allowed it to begin inking the deals with companies that Huawei simply wasn’t allowed to.

The fruits of that freedom will be the Honor 50 series, the company confirmed today. “Honor devices will undergo Google’s Play Protect certified security review and compatibility testing process to ensure they are ready to run apps from Google and the Google Play Store,” the company told SlashGear in a statement. “Honor devices will therefore have the option to have Google Mobile Services (“GMS”) preinstalled on compatible devices, in accordance with Google’s licensing and governance models. Consumers will be able to experience HONOR smartphones and tablets equipped with GMS.”

It’ll include both smartphones and tablets from Honor, beyond just the new Honor 50. “Going forward all the phones that we will launch in global markets will have GMS,” a spokesperson told us.

It’s a big deal for Honor, and its ambitions to be a player in global markets. Without the Google deal it’s been unable to include apps like Gmail, Google Maps, and YouTube on its phones. Equally important, it hasn’t been able to load the Google Play Store either, meaning buyers of Honor devices have been cut off from Google’s official app download store.

For the Honor 50 series specifically, the company plans to put the phones up for preorder in China on June 16. Broader availability – including the UK, France, Mexico, Malaysia, Russia, and Saudi Arabia – will follow later in the year, though no further details have been shared at this stage.

The Honor 50 Pro is, unsurprisingly, the more interesting of the two. It has a 6.72-inch 120Hz display, and is powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 778G chipset. On the back are two circular camera clusters, with a 100-megapixel main sensor, an 8-megapixel ultra-wide, a 2-megapixel depth camera, and a 2-megapixel depth camera. On the front there’s a pair of cameras for selfies: a 32-megapixel regular sensor, and a 12-megapixel ultra-wide.

For the Honor 50, the chipset is the same, as are the rear cameras. However the screen is a 6.57-inch 120Hz panel, and the selfie camera loses out on the dedicated ultra-wide. The Honor 50 Pro has a 4,000 mAh battery with up to 100W fast-charging, while the Honor 50 has a slightly larger 4,300 mAh battery but only 66W fast charging.

The Honor 50 will be priced at RMB 2699 ($422), and the Honor 50 Pro at RMB 3699 ($578).

Continue Reading

Trending