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OpenStack Stein: A new cool drink of open-source cloud

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The future of cloud-based services
Jason McGee, IBM fellow, VP and CTO, IBM cloud platform, talks about how IBM continues to grow within the open-source community.

While OpenStack is concerned with more than just Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud these days, it’s still primarily an open-source cloud open-source consortium. In its latest release, OpenStack Stein, the cloud comes with significant network management, bare metal, and containers improvements.

For its users, which include many telecoms, the network management part is the most tasty part. OpenStack Neutron, its networking-as-a-service component, now boasts Network Segment Range Management. This enables cloud administrators to manage network segment type ranges dynamically. It uses a new application programming interface (API) extension to do this. Previously, you were stuck with manually editing configuration files.

Neutron also now treats treats bandwidth as a resource. Thus, it can work with the OpenStack Nova compute service to schedule instances only to hosts, which have enough bandwidth to do a given job effectively.

Finally, other Neutron API improvements support for Quality of Service (QoS) policy rule aliases. This enables sysadmins to to delete, show, and update QoS rules much more easily.

Ironic, OpenStack’s bare-metal provisioning service, offers better deployment templates. Standalone users can now request allocations of bare-metal nodes with submitted configuration data. Previously, you had to use pre-formed configuration drives.

As for Kubernetes — because who isn’t using Kubernetes for container orchestration? — OpenStack Magnum has greatly improved Kubernetes cluster launch time. With Stein, it will only take you five minutes per node instead of 10 to 12 minutes. With this release, too, you can now launch a fully integrated Kubernetes cluster with support for such core OpenStack services as Manila, Cinder, and Keystone on a pre-existing OpenStack cloud.

OpenStack is also adding some new services. These include:  

  • Blazar, the resource reservation service, introduced a new Resource Allocation API allowing operators to query the reserved state of their cloud resources.
  • Placement enables you to target a candidate resource provider. This makes it easier to specify a workload migration host. In turn, this increases API performance by 50 percent for common scheduling operations. Nova’s internal Placement service will be removed by the the Train release scheduled for October 2019.
  • Sahara, makes it easier to provision data processing frameworks, such as Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark, and Apache Storm, on OpenStack. It’s been been refactored into a easier-to-use architecture to make it easier to use this functionality.

Jonathan Bryce, the OpenStack Foundation executive director, summed this release up: “With Stein, operators gain new capabilities for bare metal management and networking, running high-performance workloads with GPUs, operating and Network functions virtualization (NFV) deployments. OpenStack has also become a powerful platform for managing Kubernetes clusters in private and multi-cloud deployments.”

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This Tesla Supercar Is The Future Of Electric Cars We Want Elon Musk To Build

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British concept artist Khyzyl Saleem took to Instagram and Facebook to reveal the Tesla Precept Concept, a Tesla supercar/hypercar in the eyes of an under-30 designer. More than just a flight of fancy, the design was Saleem’s final submission for his Meguiar’s art piece dubbed “Electrifying 2020,” and it looks brilliant.

Saleem took influence from modern hypercars like the Czinger 21C, Rimac Nevera, Lotus Evija, and the Porsche Mission R concept to finalize his creation. But in our eyes, the Tesla Precept more closely resembles the offspring of a first-gen Tesla Roadster and a McLaren supercar, particularly a 765LT. The front clip is a bit off with its intricate hood design, and the Tesla “mustache” grille looks like an afterthought, but the rear is not too bad. We fancy the recessed taillight and wing spoiler design, and that swooping design on the diffuser is fascinating.

The artist claims the design is a “super early and kinda rough version” that, given more time, would have been something more unique. Tesla’s incoming Roadster is not a bad-looking car, but the Precept Concept proves what could have been if Tesla designers had taken a swill of scotch before buttoning down for work.

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Indiana Is The First State To Sue TikTok Over Child Safety Worries

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To tech-savvy and/or historically informed readers, the widespread concern about TikTok in the U.S. might smack of earlier moral panics. As mental health nonprofit Take This reports, it’s a matter of record that social media, video and tabletop games, clothing choices, music genres, and virtually anything else enjoyed by the young have been excoriated by American elders on one moral basis or another.

At the same time, serious questions have been raised about the safety of TikTok as a platform. We’ve reported in the past about the successes and failures of TikTok’s content moderation, from its largely hands-off, algorithmic approach to managing content to the borderline unethical treatment experienced by the human moderators the platform does possess. Content capable of generating severe psychological trauma in adult professional content managers certainly shouldn’t be emerging in children’s feeds.

Moderation and data security are also inescapably entwined. Hands-off moderation doesn’t just threaten the possibility of traumatic content in users’ feeds; it allows for sharing media at least some users are likely to see as unethical if not illegal. Add that to the documented pressures that Chinese law puts on social media platforms and it starts to seem like the Indiana lawsuit, right or wrong, at least has some kind of grounding.

Still, TikTok has answered critics and survived plenty of tough talk from the previous presidential administration. Whether it can continue to do so will depend both on the commitment of the platform’s user base and its ability to adapt to the requirements of American law.

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How Fast Is The Electric Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Really?

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According to Livewire, the ONE has some impressive speed and acceleration numbers, going from 0-60 mph in just three seconds and topping out at 110 mph. Sure, 110 mph doesn’t seem awfully fast, but Harley-Davidson motorcycles were never known for being fast. According to testing by CycleWorld, the Livewire ONE lives up to its reputation, accelerating from 0-60 mph in 3.1 seconds — a fraction of a second slower than the marketed number.

Interestingly, in terms of acceleration, the Livewire ONE is second only to the FXDR 114, which has a 0-60 mph time of only 2.5 seconds, according to Harley Davidson of Kingwood. Being quick off the line is par for the course for an electric motorcycle, though — there are no gears to cycle through, and electric motor torque is usually much higher at low RPM. The highest top speed for a production Harley-Davidson bike also goes to the FXDR 114, which tops out at a respectable 160 mph, according to Peterson’s Harley-Davidson. As far as the Livewire ONE’s 110 mph top speed, that’s par for the course for Harley-Davidson, with most everything except for the FXDR 114.

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