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Paperwork for Southern Cross Next cable build signed off

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Telstra buys quarter share of Southern Cross Cable Network
Australia’s incumbent telco picks up 25 percent of Southern Cross and gains capacity on existing and future cables.

Southern Cross has gained the regulatory approvals needed to move into the construction phase for its Next cable between Australia and the United States.

The 13,483 kilometre cable is set to cost $300 million and is designed to carry 72Tbps, adding to the two present Southern Cross cables carrying 20Tbps. Next is now set for completion by January 2022. The cable will span Sydney to Los Angeles, as well as hit Auckland, Fiji, Tokelau, and Kiribati along the way.

Alcatel Submarine Networks will build the cable that Southern Cross believes will have the lowest latency between Australasia and the US.

At the same time, the process of Telstra gaining a quarter share of the Southern Cross Cable Network is set to be completed over the next few days.

Southern Cross said the remaining conditions of the transaction were “procedural in nature”.

As a result of Telstra’s purchase, Spark New Zealand will see its holding be diluted from 50% down to 37.5%. The other shareholders of Southern Cross are Singapore’s Singtel, and Verizon Business.

“With 80% of all the internet traffic to Australia coming from the US, a high speed, low latency direct route to North America is a very important investment for our business and our customers,” Telstra enterprise group executive Michael Ebeid said.

“Southern Cross builds on our existing footprint across Asia Pacific where we carry 30% of the region’s active capacity.”

Spark told the ASX that it expects the Next cable to contribute NZ$70 million to NZ$90 million in equity until the end of fiscal year 2022.

In May, the consortium of companies behind the Indigo subsea cable — Telstra, SubPartners, Google, Singtel, AARNet, Indosat Ooredoo, and Alcatel Submarine Networks — announced that the 36Tbps connection between Australia to Singapore was ready for use.

Indigo consists of two parts, a western 4,600km link between Perth and Singapore, and its central 4,600km link between Perth and Sydney that is claimed to be Australia’s first transcontinental fibre optic submarine cable. A branch also provides connectivity to Jakarta.

Related Coverage

Sunshine Coast Council completes AU$7.2m subsea cable landing station

It will house the connection of the AU$35 million Japan-Guam-Australia subsea system.

Indigo subsea cable made ready for use

36Tbps cable linking Australia to Singapore launched slightly over two years from announcement.

Telstra buys quarter share of Southern Cross Cable Network

Australia’s incumbent telco picks up 25 percent of Southern Cross and gains capacity on existing and future cables.

Tonga signs 15-year satellite deal after January cable outage

Access to the Kacific1 satellite will provide 89 outer islands with broadband speeds comparable to those seen in Tonga’s major cities.



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Bugatti W16 Mistral Puts A $5 Million Price On The End Of An Era

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It’s set into a completely new monocoque, Bugatti opting to rework its core platform rather than simply slice off the top of the coupe’s version. The curved windshield wraps around the A-pillars and into the side glass, the top line then flowing into the huge side air intakes. At the front, there’s a sizable horseshoe grille wider than on other Chiron cars.

Two roof-mounted engine air scoops work alongside the oil cooler intakes that are mounted on the side. Separating them allowed Bugatti’s designers to leave the side section of the W16 Mistral slimmer. The scoops have also been made from a custom carbon fiber structure, each of which is strong enough to support the entire weight of the roadster should it flip.

The lighting signature is where the W16 Mistral steps most decisively away from its coupe predecessors. The front has a quad-light signature that doubles as an aero aid, pulling airflow in through the clusters and then out of the front wheel arches. At the rear, the X-theme seen first on the Bugatti Bolide has been updated, here also working as a vent for the side oil coolers.

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This Brand Makes The Worst Android Phones, According To 27% Of People We Polled

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Most respondents who participated in our poll seem to earnestly believe that Xiaomi makes the worst Android phones out there. More than 27% of the polled users think Xiaomi deserves this particular crown. On the face of it, the poll results seem grossly unfair towards Xiaomi, given that the company doesn’t even sell its phones to U.S. consumers. There is no denying, however, that Xiaomi needs to do a lot to change its brand perception in the U.S. if they ever plan on releasing smartphones in North America (again, that is).

With more than 21% of the votes, a virtually unknown smartphone brand for U.S. consumers comes in second place. The brand in question here is Realme — a sub-brand owned by OPPO. Realme is a very popular smartphone brand in Asia and is known mainly for its value-for-money devices that usually compete against similarly priced alternatives from Xiaomi.

Another smartphone brand that is in desperate need of a brand overhaul is Google. More than 18% of polled people thought Google makes the worst Android phones. That’s a lot of brickbats for a company behind the software that powers Android phones. The less favorable opinion seems to stem from a long list of issues that troubled the Google Pixel lineup.

Samsung and OnePlus find themselves in the last two places on this list with 17.23% and 15.54% of the votes, respectively. It could be that the other brands are simply less popular in the minds of U.S. citizens, or it could be that Samsung and OnePlus really and truly make the best Android phones — what do you think?

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Lincoln Model L100 Concept Is Hyper-Luxury Electrification With Wild Doors And A Disco Floor

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Certainly, the exterior of the Model L100 Concept is memorable. Lincoln describes it as “the tension between exuberant elegance and subtle restraint,” and it’s clear that aerodynamics have played a big role in deciding the overall silhouette. We’ve seen how that chase for slipperiness through the air can lead to electric cars looking like relatively amorphous blobs, though that’s something Lincoln manages to avoid.

Instead, it plays with light, glass, and scale. The Model L100 Concept hunkers low to the ground, with a glass panoramic roof and reverse-hinged doors to add drama as well as make entering and exiting more straightforward. Sensors track the owner’s approach, meanwhile, with the promise of a curated light show both outside and inside. Then, the doors — which extend all the way back to the rear bumper — gape outward, while the entire glass roof section lifts up.

The concept is finished with a satin digital ceramic tricot metallic paint, shifting between cool blue and soft white. Instead of the traditional chrome, frosted acrylic has been used as a more sustainable alternative. The whole floor of the cabin, meanwhile, is one big digital panel capable of showing shifting graphics, colors, and patterns. 

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