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Peak Design’s Everyday Backpack Zip and Everyday Backpack V2 are top-notch photo and travel bags – TechCrunch

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Peak Design has evolved from a crowdfunded upstart into a trusted accessory brand for photographers everywhere, and this week it introduced updates to its ‘Everyday’ line of backpacks and bags. These new and improved designs offer stuff that impresses anyone who was previously a fan of Peak’s work, and should also win the company brand new fans, based on my testing of the all-new Everyday Backpack Zip 20L and the updated Everyday Backpack V2 30L.

Everyday Backpack Zip 20L

The Everyday Backpack Zip is a brand new product for Peak, taking a lot of inspiration from the Everyday backpack but opting for a full zip closure in place of the MagLatch that it created and introduced on the Everyday line. Opting to go with a zipper instead of the MagLatch means that the Zip backpack doesn’t have the same capacity expandability to allow you to stuff more… stuff… in the top compartment, but it also offers its own benefits depending on your needs.

First, there’s price: The Backpack Zip 20L I reviewed will cost you $219.95, which is $40 less than the equivalent Everyday Backpack with the magnetic closure. It’s not a huge gap, but if you’re looking to save a few dollars it’s a good value for what you get. The Zip also comes in a smaller 15L capacity, the smallest size for any of the Everyday Backpacks, and that’s a nice compact bag for anyone with a smaller frame or looking to carry less gear.

The zipper enclosure is also interesting in its own right, allowing you to fully open the back of the bag if you want. By default, there are rigid dividers in the backpack to effectively give it shelves, but should you want to remove these, this makes this the most easily packable Peak backpack in this daypack size range. It’s therefore a great choice for those looking for a backpack to use for purposes other than as a camera bag.

The Everyday Zip also still packs a ton of connection points for you to hook gear to, as well as improved zippers vs. Peak’s original packs. There’s a dedicated laptop sleeve with a tablet pocket that can fit 15″ laptops on the 20L and 13″ laptops on the 15L. The 20L also features the all-new adjustable laptop pocket design that Peak introduced on this generation, which includes an adjustable shelf that lets it more easily hold smaller laptops without them falling all the way to the bottom. It’s also on the standard Backpack V2, and it’s an awesome and easy-to-use quality of life improvement.

Like the Everyday Backpack, the Zip also features a pass-through luggage strap for putting it on a roller while you’re making your way through an airport, and interlocking zipper pulls that can help prevent anyone from quickly tugging open the bag to try to manage a quick pass-by theft. The durable, ripstop fabric exterior is also great for lifetime sustainability.

In terms of capacity, this is a smaller bag but it can still fit a lot of gear – I was able to pack my Sony 70-200 f/2.8 GM, Sony 100-400 f/2.8 GM and my Sony A7R IV with the 24-70 f/2.8 GM attached for instance, though fitting all that in with the requisite accessories is probably too tight a fit and merits moving up to the bigger sizes of the V2.

 

Everyday Backpack V2 30L

The improved Everyday Backpack V2 brings back the MagLatch, with a new design that Peak says is “more ergonomic and sleek.” It definitely stands out less than before, and does seem to be more intuitive to use, which is good news. The sides are again accessible via two zippered compartments (all the zippers are improved and designed for more durability) and the interior is divided by three included velcro, flexible dividers.

The overall look of the Everyday Backpack V2 has been tweaked – and for the better. It was already one of the better looking photo backpacks you could buy, but Peak has made it more rounded this generation, and improved the look of all the seams for a look that just generally projects more quality and attention to detail.

Peak sent the 30L version for me to review, and the capacity difference between it and the 20L Zip allows for packing in way more stuff, including all the various accessories like extra batteries and chargers, mics and more you’re likely to want with you on a dedicated photo or video shoot. I could easily pack the same lens+body combo mentioned above, plus a Mavic Mini and a second Sony A7III body in the 30L.

That height-adjustable laptop sleeve is again present, and makes an even bigger difference on the 30L, since the pocket is deeper to begin with. On my existing V1 Everyday, chasing down the company-issue 13″ MacBook Pro in that cavernous pocket was always a bit like diving deep to pull a rabbit out of a hat, but here it’s really easy and far less likely to give your fingers rug burn.

The shoulder straps on the Everyday V2 are also improved, and they do feel more comfortable based on initial testing. They also now have embedded magnets that connect to the back of the bag when you’re not wearing it, which is actually wonderful for when you’re stowing the bag in an airplane overhead compartment, or putting it through the scanner at the airport security checkpoint. It’s a small detail, but then again Peak’s whole rep is built on it including small details, like the various stowable straps, that remain out of the way until needed and then really deliver awesome convenience.

Bottom Line

Just like the originals, Peak has delivered what are likely the most thoughtful, carefully designed photography backpacks available on the market with their V2 range. The fact that Peak as a company is now also focused on ensuring they can build and deliver their products in a way that has a neutral impact on the climate is just an added benefit of its ability to engineer and deliver high-quality, functional gear.

Peak’s stuff is not for everyone – you can definitely get totally fine photo gear for less money. But it’s a category-leading choice for anyone with the means and a great value if you’re looking for a long-term, modular solution that you can go everywhere with.



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Minisforum U850—solid hardware and easy upgrades in a little box

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Earlier this month, we teased the announcement of a new model of mini-PC from specialty vendor Minisforum. Today, we’re taking a look at the results of some hands-on testing of the Minisforum U850, configured with a Comet Lake i5 CPU, 16GiB RAM, and a 256GB Kingston NVMe SSD.

The U850 is an aggressively generalist mini-PC, and it can tackle most roles—its dual network interfaces make it a good candidate for a high-performance router, and its combination of tons of USB ports, HDMI and DisplayPort video out, and surprisingly fast storage make it an excellent little desktop PC.

Specs at a glance: U820 / U850
CPU Intel i5-8249U (U820)
Intel i5-10210U (U850)
OS Windows 10 Pro (pre-installed) / Linux supported
RAM 16GiB DDR4 (2x 8GiB SODIMM)
GPU Intel Iris+ 655 (U820)
Intel UHD 630 (U850)
Wi-Fi M.2 Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6, dual-band + BlueTooth 5.1
SSD M.2 2280 512GB NVMe SSD
Connectivity
  • two SATA ports
  • one full-size HDMI 2.0
  • one full-size DisplayPort
  • one USB-C (full featured)
  • one USB-C (charge only)
  • four USB3.1 Type-A
  • one 1Gbps Ethernet (Realtek 8111H)
  • one 2.5Gbps Ethernet (Intel)
  • one 3.5 mm audio
  • one Digital Mic
Price as specified $639 (U820) / $699 (U850)

The only role the U850 might play that we’d advise some caution with is home theater PC (HTPC)—although it’s powerful enough to do the job, its fan noise when under load is loud enough that it might annoy the sorts of people who tend to want a small, unobtrusive HTPC in the first place.

Specifications and overview

The review unit we received was a U850 with the Comet Lake i5-10210U CPU. It matches the specs above except for storage, which is a 256GB Kingston Design-In NVMe SSD. The smaller SSD isn’t “cheating” on Minisforum’s part, by the way—it’s a configurable option on the order page, which knocks $40 off the otherwise $699 (US) purchase price.

The easiest way to describe the U850 is “midgrade laptop in a cube form factor,” so—along with the similarly designed but much less powerful Seeed Odyssey—that’s just what we compared it to in our benchmark tests.

With the i5-10210U’s wimpy UHD 630 graphics, you shouldn’t expect to do any gaming on the U850—but it holds its own on video playback and general CPU related tasks. In terms of performance, it also wipes the floor all the way around with the Seeed Odyssey mini-PC.

The one area where the Seeed Odyssey takes the prize from the Minisforum U850 is noise. We wouldn’t call the U850 obnoxious, but it does make a significant amount of fan noise whenever the processor spins up. It’s a clean whoosh, but it’s a very noticeable one, even in an office packed with other PCs. This probably isn’t something that can be avoided with a Comet Lake CPU in a small form factor; laptops with this CPU are just as noisy.

Performance

Minisforum’s U850 performs just as you’d expect a laptop armed with a Comet Lake i5-10210U to perform—middling-well for a laptop, though considerably better than many competing VESA-mountable PCs, which tend toward lower-powered CPUs such as Celeron, Pentium Silver, and so forth.

The Passmark CPU benchmark doesn’t show a considerable difference between the U850’s Comet Lake and the Gateway’s Ice Lake CPU—which is a shame, given that the Gateway’s Ice Lake has an enormously better GPU. Cinebench R20 and Geekbench 5 both show a much more marked preference for the Comet Lake, though.

There’s always a lot less to look at in single-threaded performance than multithreaded. Passmark, Cinebench R20, and Geekbench 5 all largely agree—there’s a noticeably bigger difference between the Ryzen 4700u and the Intel i5 CPUs than there is between the Comet Lake and Ice Lake i5 CPUs themselves.

Cinebench and Geekbench both show a noticeably bigger advantage for the Ryzen than Passmark does. But the most important difference here is between the three at the top and the Celeron-powered Seeed Odyssey limping along in the background, with a bit less than half the score of its closest competitor in any single-threaded test here.

This shouldn’t really be taken as a knock against the Odyssey itself—after all, it also sells for a bit less than half the cost of anything else on these charts. It also comes closer to being silent—it does have a fan, but that fan doesn’t need to do as much work as the ones on the laptops, and the result is audible.

We should also point out that the Odyssey made, in our opinion, a perfectly usable budget desktop PC. This puts the performance of the U850—and the two laptops it’s competing more closely with—in perspective. At more than double the single- and multithreaded performance of the Odyssey, the U850 isn’t just a usable desktop PC—it’s a solid one.

AAA gaming on the U850 is a bad idea, and we don’t recommend it. The Acer Swift at the top of these charts is not very good at gaming. The Gateway i5 and Minisforum i5 machines are absolutely terrible at it. Casual games will probably work OK, as well as games 10 or more years old. But that’s about it.

In addition to Time Spy, we ran the much less demanding Night Raid benchmark. Night Raid is specifically targeted at PCs with integrated graphics, which didn’t keep the i5 Gateway and i5 Minisforum from tripping over their own feet running it as well. The numbers you see on those scores translate to a very painful 5-7 frames per second in Night Raid’s demo mode at 1080p. Yuck.

We don’t have any gaming benchmarks for the Celeron-powered Odyssey, and we didn’t want to generate any—so we subbed in a Ryzen 3200U-powered low-end Gateway laptop. The i5 machines did better than the low-end Gateway, but that’s a very low bar to clear.

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Sony’s brighter A90J OLED TV makes its way to living rooms this month

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LG’s OLED TV lineup often gets the most press among its peers, but Sony’s high-end OLED TVs get positive reviews as well. Today, Sony announced pricing and release timing for its flagship 2021 OLED, the A90J.

Preorders have already started in Europe and the UK, and the US is expected to follow any time now. But regardless of the staggered preorders, the TVs will ship this month in both regions.

The A90J will be available in 55-, 65-, and 83-inch sizes. The 55-inch model will cost $3,000 in the US, while its 65-inch counterpart will cost a whopping $4,000. US and EU pricing haven’t been announced for the 83-inch model, but it costs £7,000 in the UK, so let that be your guide.

Announced around CES in January, Sony’s A90J has all the standard features for a premium TV: 4K, Dolby Vision HDR, a smart TV software suite (Google TV 10 in this case), and HDMI 2.1.

And like LG’s OLEDs that were revealed around the same time (Sony uses LG’s panels), the A90J will get brighter than its predecessor. Unfortunately, we don’t know exactly how much brighter. But that’s something reviewers will start to learn and report as these TVs ship.

Sony says it was able to get higher brightness than before not just because of new and improved panels, but with a new lamination approach that provides additional cooling, allowing the TV to push a little harder.

The claim here is that the TV can maximally use its red, blue, and green phosphors along with white simultaneously, in contrast to predecessors that couldn’t achieve that.

As has become standard for high-end TVs, part of the pitch for this new model is also about the chip inside. Sony calls the A90J’s chip “Cognitive Processor XR,” and like similar chips from LG, Samsung, or others, it uses AI and machine learning to optimize the picture in various ways.

Inputs include four HDMI (one on the side, three on the bottom), three USB (two on the side, one on the bottom), one Ethernet, one RF, and one RS-232C. There’s also a digital audio out and a headphone jack, as you’d expect. The TV supports both Chromecast and AirPlay, and those HDMI 2.1 ports of course facilitate 4K at 120 Hz as well as eARC, VRR, and ALLM.

For a while, LG and Sony were the only significant players in the OLED TV game in most regions, but that has begun to change. Panasonic has upped its game, and Philips, Vizio, and TCL have entered the fray, so OLED seems poised to hit the mainstream in a market still dominated by mostly cheaper LCD sets—or at least, that’s what these manufacturers would like to see happen.

Listing image by Sony

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YouTube’s TikTok clone, “YouTube Shorts,” is live in the US

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YouTube’s clone of TikTok, “YouTube Shorts,” is rolling out to the US as we speak. The feature launched in India this September and was first spotted on US devices by XDA Developers. Just like TikTok, Shorts lets users make and share bite-sized, one-minute videos, and users can swipe between them on the mobile app.

The YouTube Shorts section shows up on the mobile apps section of the YouTube home screen and for now has a “beta” label. It works exactly like TikTok, launching a full-screen vertical video interface, and users can swipe vertically between videos. As you’d expect, you can like, dislike, comment on, and share a short. You can also tap on a user name from the Shorts interface to see all the shorts from that user. The YouTube twist is that shorts are also regular YouTube videos and show up on traditional channel pages and in subscription feeds, where they are indistinguishable from normal videos. They have the normal YouTube interface instead of the swipey TikTok interface. This appears to be the only way to view these videos on desktop.

A big part of TikTok is the video editor, which allows users to make videos with tons of effects, music, filters, and variable playback speeds that contribute to the signature TikTok video style. The YouTube Shorts editor seems nearly featureless in comparison, offering only speed options and some music.

TikTok only has ~40 million users in the US, but worldwide, it’s expected to hit 1 billion users in 2021, according to App Annie. The majority of those users are from TikTok’s native country of China, where there are 400 million daily active users.

YouTube is the world’s biggest video platform, and the site’s go-to plan for swatting down upstart competitors with a new video format is almost always to clone them. YouTube most famously did this in 2015 when it launched YouTube Gaming, a livestream gaming platform in the vein of Amazon’s Twitch.tv. The standalone YouTube Gaming interface was shut down after four years, but the livestreaming and chat features caught on with several different communities, and there is still a small live-gaming community on YouTube. In 2017, YouTube set its photocopiers loose on Snapchat and created YouTube Stories (originally launched as “YouTube Reels”), which let channels create short update videos that disappear after seven days. Now it’s targeting TikTok with these one-minute videos. Facebook has also gone after TikTok with Instagram Reels.

YouTube Shorts first launched in India in September—a smart move, since TikTok has been banned in India since June. With no competition from the incumbent in India, YouTube Shorts has taken off in the country, with YouTube recently announcing Shorts was getting “more than 3.5 billion daily views.” TikTok is owned by the Chinese company ByteDance, and that earned it (and 100+ other Chinese services) a ban in India. TikTok was under attack from the Trump administration, too, and for a time we were expecting it to be purchased by Oracle. After losing the election, the Trump administration lost interest in TikTok, and now it seems that the company will be able to continue operating in the US.

Listing image by Getty Images / NurPhoto

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