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Porsche’s top-of-the-line EV to get the Turbo name and a $130,000-plus price tag – TechCrunch

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Porsche’s upcoming Taycan, which is expected to go on sale next year, will have at least three variants of the all-electric sports car, including an all-wheel drive version. But it’s the Taycan Turbo — the name Porsche is giving its top-of-the-line variant — that reveals the automaker’s strategy.

The names: the Taycan for the base model, Taycan 4S for the all-wheel drive version, and Taycan Turbo for the performance variant, as well as prices ranges for each were first reported by columnist Alex Roy. As Roy notes, however, “turbo” is vocabulary used for internal combustion engine vehicles.

Porsche parent company Volkswagen Group has pledged to spend more than $1 billion developing the Taycan, which roughly translates to  “lively, young horse” in a nod to its iconic emblem.

The electric vehicle is seen (in some circles) as a threat to Tesla, which has dominated the luxury electric vehicle market. With so much investment headed towards Porsche’s first all-electric vehicle, the German automaker is smartly using nomenclature familiar to its existing customer base, many of whom have never owned an EV.

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Watch a computer hack 2-dozen iPhones with 1 code – is anything sacred?

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Earlier this year, a security researcher discovered a way to remotely hack any iOS device and steal all the data inside. Before we panic, be sure to take note that the vulnerability was fixed before May of 2020. Between then and now, there’s very little chance you’ve not already downloaded the updates you needed to avoid this hack from ever having a chance to grab hold.

From Ian Beer of the Project Zero security research team at Google came the following exploit and fix. A demonstration is shown below. With the exploit as explained, Ian Beer was able to transmit a code that took advantage of a vulnerability on every iPhone within transmit distance – remotely, without any sort of physical access.

It’s important to note, again, that what was possible earlier this year is no longer possible now. That’s assuming your iPhone or iPad has the latest set of software updates from Apple, of course.

Beer created, as he suggests, “a wormable radio-proximity exploit which allows me to gain complete control over any iPhone in my vicinity.” This exploit was discovered by a single person, working along in his room earlier this year.

If one person was able to accomplish this, what’s possible when a team of hackers takes aim at a high level target? The question isn’t “is it possible” so much as it is “why doesn’t this sort of thing happen more often?”

Above you’ll see another demonstration of the code exploit in action. Here a photo is captured without alerting the target.

Could it be that vulnerabilities in connected computing devices like these are exploited in the wild more often than we realize? Are we already living in the world of Watch Dogs and we just haven’t noticed it because hackers move in silence?

Hack a talking fish, reboot a couple dozen iPhones, what’s the difference? What’s left to do but keep all our money in cash, stuffed under our mattress in the basement?

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Disney Vodafone Neo sorta turns Grogu into a Tamagotchi

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The Neo is a smartwatch made in a collaboration between Disney and Vodafone. This watch utilizes technology developed or licensed by Vodafone with characters, sounds, and imagery from Disney. The Neo is called “the smart kids watch” by Vodafone, and is “designed & connected by Vodafone, featuring Disney.” One of the “sidekick” characters featured with the device is Grogu, AKA The Mandalorian character previously known as “The Child” (unofficially nicknamed Baby Yoda!)

Neo is a smart watch that works with the ability to call, receive calls, and track location with GPS. Service is provided by Vodafone – at the moment that means this device is only available in the UK, for people that use Vodafone service.

The most exciting bit of this equation is personalization via Disney sidekick. Per Vodafone, “kids can personalize Neo with their own Disney sidekick who comes to life in the watch.” These “sidekicks” will “make daily activities fun” as they “spring to life through the day.”

Each sidekick has its own set of activities with unique sound effects. Over time, the collection of characters available for use as sidekicks will grow “at no extra charge.”

This watch will be available at first in two colors: Mint and Ocean. The watch is waterproof at a fresh water depth of 10 meters for up to 30 minutes – IP68 rated, not approved for swimming or diving. There’s also a 5MP camera on the side. This is a very strange and oddly appealing device, of that you can be sure.

This watch includes no internet access – which, as Vodafone suggests – makes this “the ideal starter device.” This watch will be available starting in early 2021 through Vodafone, and no pricing has yet been revealed. You’ll need to pay a fee up front (likely) and a subscription cost (definitely) once the device is released. UPDATE: Pricing starts at 99GBP up front with a monthly fee starting at 7GPB.

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Google Authenticator update fixes the biggest pain of 2-factor security

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As anybody even vaguely internet-savvy knows, you can never really have too much security for your accounts. Hacks are increasing in number, but even though options like two-factor authentication (also known as 2FA) are often available, there’s one big reason people might not turn them on. Now, Google Authenticator is addressing it.

What is 2 Factor Authentication?-

Two-factor authentication sits alongside your – hopefully strong – password, rather than replacing it. The idea is that, in addition to something you know, such as a password, you also demonstrate you are who you say you are with something you have.

That’s usually a device, such as a smartphone or a USB dongle, which either generates a code or needs to be inserted into the computer to prove you’re you. One of the most popular apps for that is Google Authenticator, available for Android and iOS. Once set up correctly with 2FA-compatible accounts, it generates a six-digit number every 30 seconds. If you don’t have the code number that the account you’re logging into expects, you don’t get access.

It means that, if someone hacks or guesses your password, they’re still much less likely to get into your account because they probably don’t have your phone with the authenticator app loaded on it. The downside, however, comes when it’s time to change your phone.

Google Authenticator adds 2FA migration

By design, two-factor authentication codes can only be generated by a single device at any one time. That means you have to transfer your 2FA settings over to a new phone when you upgrade: if you switched from an older iPhone to a new iPhone 12, for example, you’d need to migrate the two-factor authenticator settings across in order to retain easy access to your accounts.

Google Authenticator hasn’t traditionally made that easy. Indeed, if you’ve wanted to migrate, that’s basically been a manual process: logging into the security settings of each account and going back through the 2FA process. That typically generates a QR code which you scan in the app to register it.

This week, however, there’s an update. The new Google Authenticator – updated for Android and iOS – allows you to export your registered two-factor accounts. From the accounts view, tap the overflow button in the top-right corner and then choose “Export Accounts.” There’s the option to select which accounts you want to switch over, or you can select all of them.

On your new device, meanwhile, once you have the latest version of Google Authenticator installed, you can choose “Import existing accounts” and then scan in a QR code to transfer them.

Since the codes can only be generated by one device at a time, if you load them onto your new smartphone then they’ll be removed from the old phone.

As anybody who has moved between phones recently knows, the more two-factor authentication you rely on, the more tedious that process can be. Google Authenticator isn’t the only 2FA app out there – and some already offer account exports, too – but it’s definitely one of the most popular and straightforward (not to mention, free). And, as security researchers know all too well, the easier you can make it for people to use higher levels of protection for their accounts, the less likely they are to get hacked.

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