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Russia blocks encrypted email provider ProtonMail – TechCrunch

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Russia has told internet providers to enforce a block against encrypted email provider ProtonMail, the company’s chief has confirmed.

The block was ordered by the state Federal Security Service, formerly the KGB, according to a Russian-language blog, which obtained and published the order after the agency accused the company and several other email providers of facilitating bomb threats.

Several anonymous bomb threats were sent by email to police in late January, forcing several schools and government buildings to evacuate.

In all, 26 internet addresses were blocked by the order, including several servers used to scramble the final connection for users of Tor, an anonymity network popular for circumventing censorship. Internet providers were told to implement the block “immediately,” using a technique known as BGP blackholing, a way that tells internet routers to simply throw away internet traffic rather than routing it to its destination.

But the company says while the site still loads, users cannot send or receive email.

ProtonMail chief executive Andy Yen called the block “particularly sneaky,” in an email to TechCrunch.

“ProtonMail is not blocked in the normal way, it’s actually a bit more subtle,” said Yen. “They are blocking access to ProtonMail mail servers. So Mail.ru — and most other Russian mail servers — for example, is no longer able to deliver email to ProtonMail, but a Russian user has no problem getting to their inbox,” he said.

That’s because the two ProtonMail servers listed by the order are its back-end mail delivery servers, rather than the front-end website that runs on a different system.

The letter, translated, says that the listed internet addresses caused “the mass distribution of obviously false reports of a terrorist act” in January, resulting in “mass evacuations of schools, administrative buildings and shopping centers.” (Image: supplied)

“The wholesale blocking of ProtonMail in a way that hurts all Russian citizens who want greater online security seems like a poor approach,” said Yen. He said his service offers superior security and encryption to other mail providing rivals in the country.

“We have also implemented technical measures to ensure continued service for our users in Russia and we have been making good progress in this regard,” he explained. “If there is indeed a legitimate legal complaint, we encourage the Russian government to reconsider their position and solve problems by following established international law and legal procedures.”

Russia’s internet regulator Roskomnadzor did not return a request for comment.

Yen says the block coincided with protests against government efforts to restrict the internet, which critics have dubbed an internet “kill switch.” The Kremlin, known for its protracted efforts to crack down and stifle freedom of speech, claimed it was to protect the country’s infrastructure in the event of a cyberattack.

Some 15,000 residents protested in Moscow on Sunday, during which users started noticing problems with ProtonMail.

It’s the latest in ongoing tensions with tech companies in the wake of the Russian-backed disinformation efforts. Russia’s crackdown on the internet intensified in 2014 when it ratified a law ordering tech companies operating in the country to store Russian data within its borders. LinkedIn was one of the fist casualties of the law, leading to the site’s nationwide ban in 2016.

Last month, Facebook was told to comply with the law or face its own ban. Twitter, too, also faces a possible blackout.

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10 Iconic Movie Cars That Weren’t Even Real

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James Bond and cool cars together are the epitome of cool. The Bond franchise is famous for its car chases, extravagant crashes, and daring escapes. Six actors have portrayed agent 007 since 1963 and they have all driven a variety of cool cars, some of them equipped with space-age spycraft and defensive capabilities. The fifth Bond, Pierce Brosnan, drove one such cool car in The World is Not Enough, a BMW Z8. As an Englishman, Bond had historically driven English cars, like Aston Martin and Lotus, but a product tie-in with BMW in the nineties changed all that.

In this movie, we get to see Bond utilize some of the obligatory gadgets such as rocket launchers but also see a foretelling of things to come with a remote start and summon feature, something unheard of in 1999. However, something also unheard of is a 1999 Z8, because it did not exist until the 2000 model year. According to Top Gear, the production Z8 was not ready during filming, so BMW provided a couple of unfinished pre-production cars and gave producers specs to create other completely fabricated custom cars powered by a Chevy V8 with a Jaguar suspension for filming, particularly the scene where one gets sawed in half. The Z8 gets very little screen time in this movie, likely because they didn’t really have a complete car to work with.

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Halo Infinite’s Campaign Co-Op Beta Kicks Off Soon

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In the past, and in other major co-op games, playing co-op equals advancing the game only for the person who is hosting it. The other players join the game and progress for the host but are unable to retain that progress for their own saves, and they also cannot start up the game without the host being around to do it for them. It seems that with “Halo Infinite,” the developers behind the game wanted to take a different approach by making co-op progress accessible even after the gaming session is over. As Bender said, “One of our core principles is that we don’t want to require you to have an isolated co-op save.”

As a result of that new policy, every player’s progress is going to count toward their main playthrough. Any items, collectibles, achievements, and mission progress earned during a co-op session will carry over to an individual gamer’s save. There’s also a new approach referred to as “No Spartan Left Behind.” When you join a Fireteam and select your save slot, the game will look at mission completion across all the saves and then set up a game world for you and your friends. In that game world, any mission that has been completed will be marked as such, but only as long as every single member of the Fireteam will have it completed. If there’s even one person that hasn’t tackled it just yet, the mission will be incomplete for everyone in the co-op world.

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Satechi USB-C Slim Dock For 24-Inch iMac Review: Fixing Shortcomings

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There are plenty of iMac docks on the market today, especially after the launch of the 2021 M1 models. Part of the tradeoff for the computer’s gorgeously slim design is the dearth of ports, all of which are hidden behind its screen. But while many of these docks and hubs are advertised as compatible with the 24-inch iMac, Satechi’s new dock takes that to the extreme — in fact, the USB-C Slim Dock is designed only for the 24-inch M1 iMac. Sure, you could use it for other computers, but then you lose one of its biggest features.

That feature is actually the wide gap on its bottom that perfectly fits the base of the iMac. This makes the dock look almost like it’s part of the iMac itself, especially if you get matching colors. The dock also creates a wider base that you could put things on if you like. Either way, its exclusivity to the 2021 and 2022 M1 iMacs works in its favor, creating a seamless appearance that fits the machine perfectly.

Whether you match colors or not, the Satechi USB-C dock matches the build quality of the iMac it sits on. Made from durable aluminum, the accessory looks premium and stylish, adding some character to your desk just as much as the iMac does. The material also makes heat dissipation more effective, which comes in handy given its hidden superpower. If there’s one disappointing aspect of the dock, it would be that it’s available only in silver and blue colorways that won’t color match all the available iMac hues.

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