Connect with us

Cars

Samsung Galaxy S10 5G reportedly launching April 5

Published

on

Samsung has announced that the Galaxy S10 5G smartphone will go on sale on April 5, according to the Korea Herald.

The report said Samsung will begin selling the handset in Korea, but that it will not be taking pre-orders.

Revealed at Samsung Unpacked in San Francisco on February 20, the Galaxy S10 5G comes with a 6.7-inch display, a 3D Depth Camera for augmented reality applications, and a 4,500mAh battery that supposedly lasts a full day. It also features an Ultrasonic fingerprint scanner, a new triple-camera system at the rear, and Wireless PowerShare that charges the handset via any Qi-compatible device.

“Soon, network congestion will be a thing of the past,” Samsung said at Unpacked.

“5G … will enable us to connect and communicate in entirely new ways … the whole tech industry has been laying the groundwork for 5G for decades.”

Last week, SK Telecom said the upcoming Galaxy S10 5G smartphone will provide speeds of up to 2.7Gbps in Korea, after the carrier successfully tested the aggregation of its 5G and 4G LTE networks.

Read more: Galaxy S10: Which model should you buy?

Earlier this month, South Korea’s plan to deploy 5G by March 2019 was revealed to be facing delays, due to industry players not being ready.

This included government and telcos failing to agree on 5G pricing plans, as well as 5G smartphones not being ready from Samsung and LG.

South Korea’s Ministry of Science and ICT rejected SK Telecom’s 5G price plan of 70,000 won ($62 per month) earlier this month, saying it was too high for consumers. The carrier said its plans will become more affordable as the number of 5G customers increase.

Samsung is also planning on launching the Galaxy Fold, its foldable smartphone with 5G support, in May, while rival tech company LG is set to launch the V50 ThinQ 5G smartphone sometime that month as well.

Related Coverage

Samsung Galaxy S10 5G: A cheat sheet (TechRepublic)

Samsung’s new flagship Galaxy S10 lineup includes an upcoming 5G version.

Galaxy Buds review: Samsung’s wireless earbuds are the real deal

Samsung’s newest wireless earbuds catch up to Apple’s AirPods.

Galaxy S10 Plus hands on review: Samsung delivers worthy rival to iPhone XS Max

It’s been 10 years since Samsung launched the first Galaxy S device and this year’s model continues building upon the Galaxy Foundation with innovative tech, enhanced intelligence, and an overall solid competitor to the iPhone XS Max.

The Galaxy folds. At last, Samsung didn’t

Samsung’s Unpacked event was less a dramatic reveal than a desperate statement of intent.

5G will impact these 10 industries the most (TechRepublic)

Major 5G network deployments are expected by 2020, and the technology will create opportunities across many industries, according to CB Insights.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cars

BMW iX5 Hydrogen Production Starts, But Don’t Expect To See This Fuel-Cell SUV In Dealerships

Published

on

The reality, though, is that even with a small number of BMW iX5 Hydrogen SUVs being produced — using individual fuel-cells supplied by Toyota, but assembled into a stack by BMW using the automaker’s own processes and technologies — the expectation is that hydrogen as a fuel will be predominantly of interest to non-passenger vehicles. Instead, it arguably makes the most sense, BMW suggests, for larger vehicles like medium- to heavy-duty trucks, along with the marine and aviation sectors. We’ve already seen Toyota reveal its plans for such an FCEV truck.

Despite that, and an acknowledgment that battery-electric vehicles will undoubtedly lead in the mainstream, BMW still believes there’s a place for FCEVs. After all, the automaker argues, if the infrastructure is being built to cater for trucks, there’s no reason not to also use it for passenger vehicles like the iX5 Hydrogen.

The results of the small-series production beginning today will be used as technology demonstrators across select regions from spring 2023, BMW says. It’s unclear at this point how many will be built. Depending on the reception and the strengths of the technology, series production of a first model could follow mid-decade, ahead of a potential full portfolio of BMW FCEVs from the 2030s onwards.

Continue Reading

Cars

Tesla Set To Deliver The First Semi To Pepsi

Published

on

In October, Tesla’s CEO revealed that the production of the Tesla Semi had begun, and it was bound to be delivered today. Tesla has already started the countdown, and we expect the unveiling event to go down at the Nevada factory. The electric truck will be dispatched to Pepsi, which had ordered 100 units. Investor reports that Tesla’s stock price increased by 7.7% on Wednesday, probably in anticipation of Tesla’s Semi first delivery.

Musk tweeted on Saturday that the “Tesla team just completed a 500-mile drive with a Tesla Semi weighing in at 81,000 lbs!” However, considering that Musk said that the company is dealing with supply chain issues and market inflation, it’s unclear if Tesla will stick to the original $180,000 price it intended to sell at when it was announced in 2017. Then again, Tesla offers a cheaper Semi that will be available for about $150,000 — but it can only achieve up to 300 miles at full load capacity. For now, we can only wait until it’s on the road to confirm if the specs match up to what was promised five years ago.  

Continue Reading

Cars

Coinbase Joins Elon Musk In Slamming The Apple App Store Tax

Published

on

Coinbase complained that Apple’s insistence on its cut unreasonably interfered with its business.

Coinbase’s argument was largely the same as Elon Musk’s, and the basis of Epic Games’ aforementioned lawsuit. According to all of the above, Apple was half of a duopoly: with Google, it controlled the global app marketplace. The “duopoly” part of the argument is pretty much incontrovertible: As of October 2022, both Apple and Google control 99.43% of the global smartphone market between them (via StatCounter). Both get a 30% cut of everyone’s action on its marketplace. From the perspective of Coinbase, that took too much money out of too many elements of its business.

Epic sued over that and, as noted above, won with an asterisk. Apple had restricted in-app purchases, and courts found that anticompetitive, but did require that Apple get a 30% cut of the profits, even though they took place in someone else’s app. In short, according to the Verge, the court said that if you’ve found a way to make money using iOS, you owe Apple 30%, period.

Epic thought in-app purchases should be exempted from the tax. Coinbase thinks elements of the NFT development process — in this case, gas prices to run the processing equipment necessary to mint NFTs — should be exempt from Apple’s app tax. Apple treats all user expenses on an app as in-app purchases and, per the Epic court decision, in-app purchases mean Apple gets a cut.

It’s not a simple problem, and it’s not likely to be solved anytime soon. Stakeholders and regulators have barely begun to integrate cryptocurrency and NFTs into the conventional marketplace. Who gets paid for what is likely to be a conversation for years on end. For now, all that’s certain is that conversation has begun.

Continue Reading

Trending