Connect with us

Internet

Telegram Desktop App Found to Be Leaking IP Addresses When Initiating Calls, Company Fixes Bug

Published

on


Instant messaging app Telegram, known for its end-to-end encryption features, was found to contain a bug that would leak users’ IP addresses. A security researcher discovered that the Telegram desktop app was leaking public and private IP addresses of users during voice calls. Additionally, users did not have an option to turn off the feature that could potentially leave them vulnerable to cyber-attacks. However, Telegram has reportedly fixed the bug in its latest updates. Notably, the company’s security team has awarded the researcher EUR 2,000 (roughly Rs. 1,68,900) for reporting the bug in the app.

Security researcher Dhiraj Mishra reported the Telegram bug, which he says was causing the desktop app to be leaking both public and private IP addresses during voice calls to be made over a P2P (peer-to-peer) framework. While smartphone users have the option of turning off P2P calls by changing the settings to other options by going to Settings > Privacy and security > Calls > Peer-To-Peer, there was no such option available for Telegram users on the desktop.

Photo Credit: Dhiraj Mishra/ InputZero

The voice calling feature in Telegram works by establishing a direct P2P connection between the users, thereby exchanging data packets between the two directly. Such a connection is said to directly expose the IP addresses of the users. As mentioned, Telegram app users on mobile can choose to prevent their IP addresses from being revealed by changing the settings to Nobody. According to Mishra, this option was absent on Telegram’s desktop client. This could result in all calls initiated from the desktop version potentially leaking the users’ IP addresses.

Notably, the company has now fixed the issue in the 1.3.17 beta and 1.4 versions of Telegram by adding the Nobody option in its desktop client settings. The IP address leak has received the CVE-2018-17780 vulnerability identifier and as mentioned, the company has rewarded a bounty to Mishra for his bug report. Users can now go to Settings > Privacy and security > Calls > Peer-To-Peer and set the option to Nobody.

<!–

–>

Source link



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Internet

Microsoft Teams gets new video features, Fluid docs & digital downtime

Published

on

Windows 11 may not be quite ready for primetime, but Microsoft isn’t letting that stop it from launching its latest features for the hybrid workplace, including updates to Teams and new Fluid support across more apps. For meetings mixing together in-person and remote participants – which look likely to persist well beyond 2021 – Microsoft has new video calling features … Continue reading

Continue Reading

Internet

Researchers develop a deep learning method able to animate portions of a photo

Published

on

We’ve all looked at a photograph at some point of something like the ocean, clouds, or waterfall, and for the briefest time, it almost seems like the picture is moving. Typically, that perceived motion is just a trick of our minds. Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new deep learning method that can animate certain portions of … Continue reading

Continue Reading

Internet

Facebook developes a method of detecting and attributing deepfakes

Published

on

Deepfakes have been around for a while now, but recently they’ve become so realistic that it’s hard to tell a deepfake from a legitimate video. For those who might be unfamiliar, a deepfake takes the face and voice of a famous person and creates a video of that person saying or doing things they’ve never actually done. Deepfakes are most … Continue reading

Continue Reading

Trending