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The $5.5m Bugatti Divo hypercar is finally ready to show what it can do

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Bugatti’s cornering-obsessed Divo hypercar is finally ready to head out to an exceedingly short list of buyers, with production of the agile Chiron variant finally ready to bear fruit. Announced in 2018, the Divo takes a slightly different tack from the Chiron, focusing less on maximum speed and more on how capable it is in the turns.

That’s not to say the Divo will be slow. With the same 8.0-liter W16 engine as the Chiron, that means 1,479 horsepower and 0-62 mph in 2.4 seconds. Top speed has ben limited to “just” 236 miles per hour.

However Bugatti’s engineers stripped around 77 pounds from the car, and then added new bodykit parts to introduce significantly more downforce. There are new hood air inlets, reducing the front area of the coupe and improving air flow. The front spoiler ramps up on downforce as well as pushing air into the front air intakes for cooling.

There are four independent intakes on the side, helping cool the brakes, and a fixed-height rear wing is 23-percent wider than that of the Chiron. A new roof design helps avoid turbulence around that spoiler, which can also be adjusted for angle and act as an air brake.

The result is over 1,000 pounds of downforce at 236 mph, almost 200 pounds more than the Chiron would muster. To that, the team added a change in wheel camber front and rear, harder springs, and a more front-oriented balance. Altogether it helps stick the Divo to the asphalt and improve on cornering stability, with Bugatti claiming the car pulls 1.6 g in lateral acceleration.

Outside, lightweight LED headlights are one end and complex 3D tail lights at the other have been added, while the rear grille uses 3D printing and new, lightweight fins. Inside, meanwhile, new sports seats have added extra side bolstering to help keep the driver and passenger in place during high-speed turns. The steering wheel is clad in Alcantara, for better grip, and the wheel-mounted paddle shifters have been enlarged to make them easier to grab at.

Bugatti will only make 40 of the cars, a limited-edition of what’s already a very rare vehicle. All 40 have been sold, too, with Bugatti approaching existing Chiron owners and finding them ready and willing to open their wallets for the 5 million euro ($5.42 million) hypercars. Deliveries will begin this year.

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Tesla Set To Deliver The First Semi To Pepsi

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In October, Tesla’s CEO revealed that the production of the Tesla Semi had begun, and it was bound to be delivered today. Tesla has already started the countdown, and we expect the unveiling event to go down at the Nevada factory. The electric truck will be dispatched to Pepsi, which had ordered 100 units. Investor reports that Tesla’s stock price increased by 7.7% on Wednesday, probably in anticipation of Tesla’s Semi first delivery.

Musk tweeted on Saturday that the “Tesla team just completed a 500-mile drive with a Tesla Semi weighing in at 81,000 lbs!” However, considering that Musk said that the company is dealing with supply chain issues and market inflation, it’s unclear if Tesla will stick to the original $180,000 price it intended to sell at when it was announced in 2017. Then again, Tesla offers a cheaper Semi that will be available for about $150,000 — but it can only achieve up to 300 miles at full load capacity. For now, we can only wait until it’s on the road to confirm if the specs match up to what was promised five years ago.  

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Coinbase Joins Elon Musk In Slamming The Apple App Store Tax

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Coinbase complained that Apple’s insistence on its cut unreasonably interfered with its business.

Coinbase’s argument was largely the same as Elon Musk’s, and the basis of Epic Games’ aforementioned lawsuit. According to all of the above, Apple was half of a duopoly: with Google, it controlled the global app marketplace. The “duopoly” part of the argument is pretty much incontrovertible: As of October 2022, both Apple and Google control 99.43% of the global smartphone market between them (via StatCounter). Both get a 30% cut of everyone’s action on its marketplace. From the perspective of Coinbase, that took too much money out of too many elements of its business.

Epic sued over that and, as noted above, won with an asterisk. Apple had restricted in-app purchases, and courts found that anticompetitive, but did require that Apple get a 30% cut of the profits, even though they took place in someone else’s app. In short, according to the Verge, the court said that if you’ve found a way to make money using iOS, you owe Apple 30%, period.

Epic thought in-app purchases should be exempted from the tax. Coinbase thinks elements of the NFT development process — in this case, gas prices to run the processing equipment necessary to mint NFTs — should be exempt from Apple’s app tax. Apple treats all user expenses on an app as in-app purchases and, per the Epic court decision, in-app purchases mean Apple gets a cut.

It’s not a simple problem, and it’s not likely to be solved anytime soon. Stakeholders and regulators have barely begun to integrate cryptocurrency and NFTs into the conventional marketplace. Who gets paid for what is likely to be a conversation for years on end. For now, all that’s certain is that conversation has begun.

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LastPass Security Breach Exposed Some Customer Data, But Details Are Still Slim

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LastPass’ new blogpost continues to be vague about the nature of the latest security incident that has affected the platform. What it does reveal, however, is that the company recently detected yet another incident of “unusual activity” within a third-party cloud storage service connected to LastPass. LastPass stopped short of revealing details surrounding the affected third-party cloud service. However, TechCrunch has hinted at the possibility of the cloud service being AWS. For those unaware, starting in 2020, LastPass began using AWS (Amazon Web Services) to store more than a billion customer records on Amazon’s cloud.

LastPass goes on to add that the security incident prompted an immediate internal investigation, following which they ascertained that the threat actor was able to access “certain elements” of LastPass’ customer information. Interestingly, LastPass has also confirmed that the unauthorized party used data from the August 2022 incident to gain access to LastPass’ systems.

While LastPass hasn’t revealed the exact nature of customer information that has been breached, they maintain that customers’ passwords have not been affected. LastPass also said it had engaged the services of Mandiant — a leading security firm — to help them with the investigation. The company has also notified law enforcement agencies about the same. The company has promised to share more updates surrounding the latest incident after they conclude an internal investigation.

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