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The Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2 is a truly great game controller – TechCrunch

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Microsoft’s original Xbox Elite controller was a major step up for gamers, with customizable buttons, changeable physical controls and adjustable sensitivity for serious personalization. The new Xbox Elite Controller Series 2 has just landed, and it offers similar features, but with new and improved features that add even more customization options, along with key hardware improvements that take what was one of the best gaming controllers available and make it that much better.

USB-C

This might seem like a weird place to start, but the fact that the new Xbox Elite 2 comes with USB-C for charging and wired connections is actually a big deal, especially given that just about every other gadget in our lives has moved on to adapting this standard. Micro USB is looking decidedly long in the tooth, and if you’re like me, one of the only reasons you still have those cables around at all is to charge your game controllers.

In the box, you get a braided USB-A to USB-C charging cable, which at nine feet is plenty long enough to reach from your console to your couch. Of course, you also can use your phone, tablet, MacBook or any other USB-C charger and cable combo to power up the Elite 2, which is why it’s such a nice upgrade.

This is big for one other key reason: Apple recently added Xbox controller compatibility to its iPad lineup, which also charges via USB-C. That’s what makes this the perfect controller for anyone looking to turn their tablets into a portable gaming powerhouse, as it reduces the amount of kit you need to pack when you want to grab the controller and have a good option for digging into some iPad gaming.

Adjustable everything

Probably the main reason to own the Elite 2 is that it offers amazing customization options. New to this generation, you can even adjust the resistance of the thumbsticks, which is immensely useful if you’re a frequent player of first-person shooter (FPS) games, for instance. This lets you tune the sensitivity of the sticks to help ensure you’re able to find the right balance of sensitivity versus resistance for accurate aiming, and it should help pros and enthusiasts make the most of their own individual play style.

The shoulder triggers also now have even shorter hair-trigger locks, which means you can fire quicker with shorter squeezes in-game. And in the case, you’ll find other thumbsticks that you can swap out for the ones that are pre-installed, as well as a D-pad you can use to replace the multi-directional pad.

On top of the hardware customization, you also can tweak everything about the controller in software on Windows 10 and Xbox One, using Microsoft’s Accessories app. You can even assign a button to act as a “Shift” key to provide even more custom options, so that you can set up key combos to run even more inputs. Once you find a configuration you like, you can save it as a profile to the controller and switch quickly between them using a physical button on the controller’s front face.

Even if you’re not a hardcore multiplayer competitive gamer, these customization options can come in handy. I often use profiles that assign thumbstick clicks to the rear paddle buttons, for instance, which makes playing a lot of single-player games much more comfortable, especially during long sessions.

Dock and case included

The Xbox Elite 2 includes a travel case, just like the first generation, but this iteration is improved, too. It has a removable charging dock, which is a quality accessory in its own right. The dock offers pass-through charging even while the controller is inside the case, too, thanks to a USB-C cut-through that you can seal with a rubberized flap when it’s not in use.

In addition to housing the charger and controller, the case can hold the additional sticks and D-pad, as well as the paddles when those aren’t in use. It’s got a mesh pocket for holding charging cables and other small accessories, and the exterior is a molded hard plastic wrapped in fabric that feels super durable, and yet doesn’t take up much more room than the controller itself when packed in a bag.

The case is actually a huge help in justifying that $179.99 price tag, as all of this would be a significant premium as an after-market add-on accessory for a standard controller.

Bottom line

Microsoft took its time with a successor to the original Xbox Elite Wireless Controller, and while at first glance you might think that not much has changed, there are actually a lot of significant improvements here. The controller’s look and feel also feel better, with more satisfying button, pad and the stick response, and a better grip thanks to the new semi-textured finish on the front of the controller.

USB-C and more customization options might be good enough reason even for existing Elite Controller owners to upgrade, but anyone on the fence about getting an Elite to begin with should definitely find this a very worthwhile upgrade over a standard Xbox One controller.



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Review: HP’s Elite Dragonfly Chromebook is the cream of the ChromeOS crop

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Enlarge / HP Elite Dragonfly Chromebook.

Specs at a glance: HP Elite Dragonfly Chromebook
Worst Best As reviewed
Screen 13.5-inch 1920 x 1280 IPS touchscreen 13.5-inch 1920 x 1280 IPS touchscreen 13.5-inch 2256 x 1504 IPS touchscreen
OS Chrome OS
CPU Intel Core i3-1215U Intel Core i7-1265U vPro Intel Core i5-1245U vPro
RAM 8GB LPDDR4-4266 32GB LPDDR4-4266 8GB LPDDR4-4266
Storage 128GB NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD 512GB NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD 256GB NVMe PCIe 3.0 SSD
GPU Intel Iris Xe
Networking WiFi-6E, Bluetooth 5.2
Ports 2x Thunderbolt 4, 1x USB-A,1x HDMI 2.0, 1x 3.5 mm jack, 1x MicroSD card reader
Size 11.59 x 8.73 x 0.65 inches
(294.38 x 221.74 x 16.51 mm)
Weight Starts at 2.8 lbs (1.27 kg)
Battery 50 Wh
Warranty 1 year
Price (MSRP) $980 $1,800 $1,709 when configured on HP.com
Other N/A 4G optional

Chromebooks are tired of being treated like second-class citizens.

Over the last decade, the developers of ChromeOS have attempted to evolve the operating system with features that could put it more on par with macOS and Windows. Google has been pushing Chromebooks as business machines, touting the purported simplicity and security benefits of their pared down operating system.

HP’s new Elite Dragonfly Chromebook represents a ChromeOS device pushed to the limits, from its appearance to its components.

The laptop comes dressed like some of HP’s most coveted business machines and with up to a 12th Gen Intel Core i7 CPU with Intel vPro support. Performance and style are in a class notably higher than what many think of when they think of Chromebooks.

But while it’s suitable for business users with simple, web-focused needs alone, its performance doesn’t equal Windows machines in the same price range.

$$$

With promises of business-class performance, the Elite Dragonfly Chromebook is one of the most expensive Chromebooks available, at well over $1,000 with maxed-out specs. Of course, there are still Chromebooks available for a few hundred dollars, but with a growing interest in pushing Chromebooks as fleet-ready enterprise machines, eventual gaming devices, and ultraportables with versatile form factors, there are already several Chromebooks in the Dragonfly Chromebook’s elite price class.

Here’s what you can get specs-wise from other pricey Chromebooks when configured similarly to our review machine and based on what’s readily available as of this writing. Note that our configuration isn’t a specific SKU but was rather configured on HP.com. You can find a similar SKU to my review unit but with a 1920×1280 resolution for $1,450.

Model CPU RAM Storage Display Price (as of this writing) Mobile  Networking
HP Elite Dragonfly Chromebook i5-1245U vPro 8GB 256GB SSD 13.5-inch 2256 x 1504 touchscreen $1,709 4G, 5G coming
Dell Latitude 7410 Chromebook Enterprise i5-10310 16GB 256GB SSD 14-inch 1920 x 1080 touchscreen $1,564 4G
Lenovo ThinkPad C14 Chromebook i5-1245U vPro 8GB 256GB SSD 14-inch 1920 x 1280 $1,019 4G
Samsung Galaxy Chromebook Intel Core i5-10210U 8GB 256GB SSD 13.3-inch 3840 x 2160 OLED touchscreen $1,000 N/A

One of the Dragonfly Chromebook’s biggest claims to fame is its optional inclusion of Intel vPro. Among Chromebooks, only the ThinkPad C14 shares this option. vPro support helps sell machines to IT departments, as it enables remote management of the devices.

HP is particularly interested in the stability that the platform promises, a spokesperson told reviewers during a briefing. vPro machines are supposed to use identical silicon across units for as long as the device is sold. HP also pointed to vPro’s performance standards and security perks, particularly vPro’s total memory encryption.

The 2-in-1 also supports 4G for mobile working. 5G is purportedly coming this fall and would help the Dragonfly stand out.

Additional security claims come from Google, which says its read-only OS, verified boot, and blocked executables reduce the need for antivirus protection. IT staff can also approve and block apps and extensions, remotely disable or wipe devices, and perform background updates.

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For the first time ever, more people watched streaming TV than cable

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Enlarge / Nielsen’s breakdown of TV viewing in July 2022.

A new report from market measurement firm Nielsen says that for the first time, TV viewers watched more on streaming services like Netflix and Disney+ than they did on cable TV, making streaming the most popular way to consume content.

The shift has been predicted by analysts and commentators for years, but it has only now come to fruition. Streaming had previously outpaced over-the-air broadcast TV, but cable was still beating it until July.

In July, streaming accounted for 34.8 percent of audiences’ TV viewing. The runner-up was the now-dethroned cable TV, which came up narrowly behind at 34.4 percent. The relatively distant third was broadcast at 21.6 percent.

Streaming was up 22.6 percent compared to July of 2021, and audiences streamed an average of 190.9 billion minutes per week. Nielsen points out that this is substantially more than a previously publicized streaming number: 169.9 billion minutes in April of 2020, one of the most locked-down months of the pandemic.

All that said, the shift could be attributed as much to a lack of new content—especially sports programming—on cable in July as to the growth of streaming. Streaming services have been pumping out new content as fast as ever, while cable channels have slowed down for the summer. There is also much more streaming content than there used to be, thanks to new service launches like Peacock and Paramount+ over the past few years.

Nielsen notes that overall TV viewership hasn’t changed much—just the relative size of each slice of the pie. In other words, people aren’t watching more TV; they’re watching the same amount of TV but in different ways.

The report also outlined the relative performance of different popular streaming platforms. The biggest category was the catch-all “other streaming” at 10.2 percent of the streaming pie, but Netflix was the top single service at 8 percent. It was followed by YouTube at 7.3 percent, Hulu at 3.6 percent, Amazon Prime Video at 3 percent, Disney+ at 1.8 percent, and HBO Max at one percent.

Finally, it’s worth mentioning that Nielsen is tracking data from viewing on actual TVs. This data does not include mobile or desktop viewing, which would likely boost streaming even further.

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Hands-on: Logitech’s tiny G705 wireless mouse is more versatile than it looks

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Enlarge / Logitech G705 wireless mouse.

Scharon Harding

I’ll admit it; I have a lot of PC mice. And it’s not just because I review them. Between traveling, multiple computers, gaming, and my living room, I have interest in multiple mice that cater to different needs.

One of those needs is portability. Sure, it’s easy enough to find a mouse that’s wireless and lightweight, but often that comes with limited comfort and/or pared-down features.

At first glance, Logitech’s G705 wireless mouse, announced in late July, seemed too minute to pack real power or accommodate anything but smaller hands. But a few hours into using the peripheral have shown me there’s more than meets the eye in this tiny mouse.

Confusing setup

Logitech’s G705 comes with a 2.4 GHz USB-A dongle, (plus a wireless extender and cable), or you can connect via Bluetooth LE. Logitech includes both because it markets this as fit for gaming and claims the dongle offers latency as low as 1 ms with a 1,000 Hz polling rate, compared to Bluetooth, which limits the mouse’s polling rate to 133 Hz. Since I was gearing up for a day of work, I decided to use Bluetooth, which should also yield better battery life, but this wasn’t so easy at first.

Some wireless mice that offer both dongle and Bluetooth connections have a physical switch to toggle between the two wireless modes or a light indicator to let you know what mode you’re in. The G705’s underside only has a power toggle and a purple button with a mysterious hieroglyphic of two squares and two arrows, plus a light that’s either light blue (dongle connection) or dark blue (Bluetooth). For some, the color difference may not be strong enough for easy reading.

Things could be a little simpler under here.
Enlarge / Things could be a little simpler under here.

Scharon Harding

Even more confusing, Logitech’s included instructions don’t mention that you have to press the button in order to switch between dongle or Bluetooth mode or even that the light indicator can be two (slightly) different colors.

For an amount of time I’d rather not admit to, I was trying to pair the mouse via Bluetooth when it was in dongle mode. I had to use the mouse’s support page to figure things out.

Trading RGB for extra software

If you thought going to a website to figure out how to switch between wireless modes was annoying, you’ll be even more perturbed by this next part.

Like many peripherals with a gaming focus, the G705 has a bounty of features, like programmable buttons and DPI (see our PC mouse terms guide for more on DPI and other mouse lingo) customization, available through software. If you’re happy with how the mouse is programmed and the three preset DPI settings (changeable out-of-the-box by the button south of the scroll wheel), you could make do without Logitech’s G Hub app, but then there’s no way to rid the thing of RGB.

The three RGB zones run around the edge of the mouse, with most of it getting covered when I used the mouse. RGB is a divisive topic in PCs. The LEDs can be gaudy or, worse, intrusive, and can be hard to disable or customize.

You need the app to turn off the light show.
Enlarge / You need the app to turn off the light show.

Scharon Harding

But in a wireless, portable device like this, the bigger issue is battery life. The G705 has the potential to be a multi-device accessory, since it’s only 0.19 pounds and so small. But having to download G Hub on every device in order to use it sans RGB (assuming the app is supported) makes that transition much more painful.

Logitech claims the mouse can last for up to 40 hours with the RGB on but didn’t specify brightness level or effect used. When I left RGB on max brightness for two hours, the mouse’s in-app battery meter read 90 percent.

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