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Think your Wi-Fi’s faster than mobile internet? Not in these 33 countries

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Ten years ago, Wi-Fi was universally faster than a cellular connection, but that’s no longer the case in 33 countries, according to OpenSignal.

OpenSignal’s analysis has found that mobile connections are up to 13Mbps faster in 41 percent of the 80 countries where users have installed its smartphone app.

That’s a huge change from when the first iPhone launched and when Wi-Fi was way faster everywhere and cheaper.

The speed difference varies significantly between countries. In Australia, mobile speeds average 34.6Mbps compared with Wi-Fi speeds of 21.6 Mbps, while in Lebanon mobile speeds of 14.8 Mbps beat Wi-Fi speeds of 2.5 Mbps.

In Taiwan, mobile is 1.6Mbps faster than Wi-Fi at 26.3Mbps, while Mexico-based users are getting 13.4Mbps on mobile and 11.2Mbps on Wi-Fi.

Open Signal analyst Ian Fogg argued that the findings should challenge the assumption by mobile operators and smartphone makers that Wi-Fi is better, which can be seen by phones automatically connecting to a Wi-Fi network when one is available.

SEE: IT pro’s guide to the evolution and impact of 5G technology (free PDF)

While this is preferable for users with mobile data caps, it increasingly means that smartphones are automatically switching to a slower network with a worse experience.

Other countries where mobile is at least 5Mbps faster than Wi-Fi included Qatar, Oman, Greece, Czech Republic, Myanmar, Iran, Turkey, Bolivia, Croatia, South Africa, and Egypt.

Looking just at 4G speeds and not 3G, OpenSignal found that 4G is faster than Wi-Fi in 50 countries, or 63 percent of countries. Users in Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Australia, and Greece are getting 17 to 25Mbps faster downloads on mobile than on Wi-Fi.

Still, in most places Wi-Fi remains faster than mobile, in particular the US, Singapore, and Hong Kong, due to good fixed networks.

Fogg expects that with 5G, which will eventually offer gigabit speeds, the industry will be forced to change the assumption that Wi-Fi is better.

OpenSignal found that in 33 countries, or 41 percent of those analyzed, mobile delivers faster downloads than Wi-Fi


Image: OpenSignal

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These Are 3 Of The Worst EVs Of All Time

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If you walk into any Chevrolet dealership today, you are more than likely to see a few Chevy Sparks on the lot. The current model is equipped with a 1.4L four-cylinder engine that puts out a grand total of 98 horsepower. It’s Chevy’s cheapest car at just under $14,000 and offers features like CarPlay standard. Until recently, some new Sparks could be configured with manual crank windows — truly innovative.

Back in 2013, General Motors made an all-electric version of the Spark to comply with California’s (new at the time) emissions regulations (via Green Car Reports). The result was a less than valiant effort. Its motors were assembled just outside of Baltimore, Maryland, and shipped all the way to GM’s operations in South Korea for production.

For specs, the Spark wasn’t weak at 140 horsepower and over 300 foot-pounds of torque, but it only had a realistic range of about 80 miles, and it took more than seven hours to charge without a fast charger. An Edmunds review of the 2016 model noted that charging from a 110-volt outlet took over 20 hours for a full battery. To make matters worse, Spark EVs in the United States were only offered in Oregon, California and Maryland, according to Edmunds. 

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Which Is The Better Electric Car?

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If you prioritize acceleration, battery range, and self-driving technology, the Tesla Model 3 is the clear winner. However, the Polestar 2 comes on top if you consider comfort and interior quality. Besides that, the Polestar 2 is a hatchback with hints of a premium Volvo and the Tesla Model 3 is a sedan similar to the Model S — but smaller.

As for the price, the 2023 Polestar 2 starts at $48,800. If you’re buying the 2022 model, it will cost you about $2,500 less than the 2023 model. But if you want the 2023 Long Range Dual Motor trim, it will cost you about $51,900. The biggest improvement of the 2023 Polestar 2 over the 2022 model year is the 11 miles of extra range on the Long Range Dual Motor variant.

The Tesla Model 3 Rear-Wheel Drive starts at $46,990, while the Long-Range trim is sold at $54,490. The Tesla Model 3 Performance is the most expensive trim at $61,990. But with the U.S. Inflation Reduction Act, the Tesla Model 3 will become eligible for the $7,500 tax credit starting January 1, 2023 — although only the trims that are sold for less than $55,000 will be considered.

Unless Volvo builds the Polestar 2 in the U.S., it won’t qualify for the new tax incentive under the Inflation Reduction Act. However, we know Volvo is building an electric SUV in the U.S., and it will be known as the Polestar 3. 

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Google Stadia Shutdown Took Employees, Game Devs By Surprise

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Video game designer and founding member of multiple game studios, Rebecca Heineman shared on Twitter that her company was lined up for a Stadia game release on the first day of November, but instead got heartbreak. Indie developer Simon Roth mentioned that neither did he receive any warning in advance from Google, nor did the Stadia division reach out to him via email or phone well after the news broke out.

But it was not just indie developers that Google kept in the dark. Even heavyweights like Bungie, which brought users “Halo” and “Destiny” games, were apparently unaware of the Stadia bombshell dropping out of nowhere. Plaion, which owns multiple publishing units and ten game studios, also pointed out that it wasn’t informed in advance. Publishers Goldfire Studios and No More Robots told Kotaku that they each had a game coming out on Stadia next year.

Pixel Games shared that it finalized the deal to bring no less than three games over to Google’s cloud gaming service just a day earlier. Google, on the other hand, is reportedly working with the affected studios with schemes like reimbursing the costs of development and porting existing games to its platform. According to an Axios report, Stadia reps are reaching out to publishing and development partners with reimbursement deals.

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