Connect with us

Cars

TPG is still king of NBN speed report

Published

on

TPG has claimed first place for the third consecutive time in the fifth broadband speed-monitoring report by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), delivering 89% of its maximum plan speeds overall and 88% during busy hours for downloads in the first measurements for 2019.

The National Broadband Network (NBN) speed report [PDF], which collected measurements between February 1 and February 28, 2019, saw winner of the second ACCC report Aussie Broadband come in second, providing 87% of maximum download speeds overall and 86% in busy hours; followed by Optus, at 86% and 85%; Exetel, at 86% and 82%; iiNet, at 85% and 84.5%; Telstra, at around 84% for both; and Dodo and iPrimus, at 84% and 82%.

MyRepublic came in last place, delivering almost 83% of maximum plan speeds overall and 82% in busy hours for downloads.

Across uploads, however, Exetel again took out first place by delivering 90% of maximum plan speeds overall, and 89% of maximum plan speeds during busy hours.

Exetel was followed by TPG, which provided 87% and 86% of maximum plan speeds overall and during busy hours, respectively; iiNet, at 86% for both; Dodo and iPrimus, which almost hit 86% for both; Aussie Broadband, at around 85.5% for both; Telstra, at 82%; and MyRepublic and Optus, which both sat at around 81%.

Telstra had the lowest latency this time, with 10.7 milliseconds overall, followed by Exetel with 11.1ms; TPG and Aussie Broadband with around 11.5ms; Optus and iiNet with around 13ms; Dodo and iPrimus at 16ms; and MyRepublic at 17ms.

One new category for the report was daily outages lasting over 30 seconds, which Optus easily took out with a score of 1.5 per day. Exetel was next, on 0.4 per day; Aussie Broadband had 0.3; Dodo and iPrimus and iiNet sat at 0.2, and TPG, Telstra, and MyRepublic experienced the least, with just 0.1 daily outages.

“RSPs need to continue to monitor their networks to ensure their speed claims are realistic, and we expect NBN Co and RSPs to work harder together to help consumers achieve the speeds they are paying for,” ACCC Chair Rod Sims said.

“We will be watching to see how companies respond to customers who aren’t getting the advertised speeds on their current plans, and we will act on misleading speed and performance claims made by providers.”

The ACCC also looked into the proportion of busy hours where a telco’s advertised speed was achieved on 50/20Mbps and 100/40Mbps, finding that TPG attained this 83% of the time; Telstra and Optus around 75%; Exetel 70%; and iiNet 64%, with MyRepublic and Aussie Broadband trailing at 37% and 26%, respectively.

For its reports, the ACCC now has 172 whiteboxes on Telstra services, over 150 on Aussie Broadband and iiNet, 126 on TPG, 121 on Optus, around 60 on MyRepublic and Exetel, and 49 on Dodo and iPrimus.

This time, fibre-to-the-premises (FttP) was only slightly ahead of hybrid fibre-coaxial (HFC) in terms of delivering speeds, with the former providing 91% of maximum plan speeds overall and 92.4% upload, and the latter 90.9% download and 91.7% upload speeds overall.

Fibre-to-the-node (FttN) provided 80% and 77% of download and upload maximum plan speeds, respectively.

Shadow Communications Minister Michelle Rowland and Shadow Regional Communications Minister Stephen Jones used these figures to argue that 374,000 FttN premises are not getting the speeds they are paying for.

“Labor has a credible plan to steadily improve speed and reliability for up to 750,000 Australian households and business connected to fibre to the node,” Jones and Rowland said in a joint statement.

The ACCC’s first fixed-line broadband speed monitoring report, published in March last year, had followed the consumer watchdog forcing Telstra, Optus, TPG, iiNet, Internode, Dodo, iPrimus, and Commander to compensate tens of thousands of customers for not providing them with the NBN speeds they were paying for.

The AU$6.5 million speed-monitoring program will take place over four years, with SamKnows appointed in December 2017 to monitor speeds thanks to the government providing funding.

However, the ACCC has said that it would need an additional AU$6 million in government funding to extend the speed-monitoring program to fixed-wireless services.

Recent NBN Coverage

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cars

2022 Honda Passport is hitting the rally circuit

Published

on

The 2022 Honda Passport is hitting the rally circuit as the Japanese automaker fortifies its motorsports pedigree. And similar to the Honda HPD Ridgeline that competed at the recently concluded Rebelle Rally, the Passport is going rallying with a team of Honda engineers led by suspension test engineer and driver Chris Sladek and chassis design engineer and co-driver Gabriel Nieves. Both men are from Honda’s North American Auto Development Center in East Liberty, Ohio.

Honda recently debuted its redesigned 2022 Passport five-seat crossover SUV, which now gets a more rugged TrailSport variant with chunkier aesthetics, 18-inch wheels, and 8.1-inches of ground clearance. However, the rally version is the brainchild of the Honda Performance Development (HPD) Maxxis Rally racing team. It has 17-inch BRAID Winrace T rally wheels, Maxxis RAZR M/T or RAZR A/T tires, rear differential skid plates, and an aluminum oil pan cover to protect vital underpinnings from impacts and bumps.

Other changes include protective high-density polyethylene panels on the fuel tank, Carbotech XP12 brake pads, and racing-bred brake fluid to offer reliable stopping power. It also has OMP racing seats with six-point competition harnesses, a roll cage, a rally computer, and a fire suppression system. Of course, it gets distinctive exterior livery courtesy of HPD.

The Passport rally car is also lighter than stock with Lexan polycarbonate rear glass and deleted rear seats. Other changes like a hydraulic handbrake are mandatory, while the modified exhaust offers a louder exhaust sound while reducing engine backpressure to improve performance.

Meanwhile, there are no changes under the hood. The 2022 Honda Passport rally car is hitting the rally circuits with a stock 3.5-liter i-VTEC V6 engine, a nine-speed automatic gearbox with paddle shifters, and i-VTM4 all-wheel-drive system. “The fact that we didn’t make any modifications to the 2022 Honda Passport’s drivetrain or suspension for such punishing terrain and competition speaks volumes to the capability and performance that comes standard in the Passport,” said driver Chris Sladek.

Honda’s Passport rally truck made its racing debut at the Lake Superior Performance Rally (LSPR) in Michigan last October 15 to 16. The team finished 22nd out of 42 regional competitors while placing 4th out of six in the Limited 4WD class. The Passport will see more action throughout the 2022 American Rally Association (ARA) series.

Continue Reading

Cars

The 2022 Honda Civic Si aims right for the sweet-spot

Published

on

Honda promised something hotter from the 11th Gen Civic line, and the 2022 Civic Si is just that. Taking the well-received Civic Sedan, and then pumping in some extra performance, it should bridge the gap between now and the new Civic Type R expected to launch sometime next year – and be more affordable than that car, too.

It’s got some solid underpinnings to start from, with both the Civic Sedan and the Civic Hatchback getting praise for their handling and poise. This new Civic Si, meanwhile, upgrades Honda’s turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder VTEC engine, and then pairs it with a 6-speed manual transmission.

The engine is good for 200 horsepower arriving at 6,000 rpm, with a 6,500 rpm redline. Torque is 192 lb-ft, now arriving between 1,800 and 5,000 rpm; that, Honda points out, is 300 rpm sooner than the outgoing car. The broader power curve and a lighter flywheel should make for a car that responds more rapidly, the automaker promises.

As for the transmission, it’s an improved 6-speed manual with the rev-matching system from the Civic Type R. The result, Honda says, is a better feel and 10-percent shorter throws. You’ll have to like it, mind, since Honda won’t be offering the 2022 Civic Si with an automatic option. Fuel economy comes in at 27 mpg in the city, 37 mpg on the highway, and 31 mpg combined.

A helical limited-slip front differential is standard, along with a new Active Sound Control system which boosts the natural engine noise in the cabin. Honda insists it’ll add to, rather than detract from, the overall driving experience. Bigger brakes have been fitted, with 12.3-inch front rotors growing a whole 1.2-inches over the standard Civic Sedan, while the rear rotors grow almost an inch to 11.1-inches total. 235/40R18 all-season performance rubber is standard, with summer tires a factory option.

As with the Sedan and Hatchback, the new Si benefits from the 11th Gen Civic’s stiffer body and longer wheelbase. Honda then adds 8-percent stiffer front springs and 54-percent stiffer rear springs, together with new dampers, reinforced upper front MacPherson struts for better cornering, and thicker front and rear stabilizer bars to cut body roll. The Type R donates compliance bushings, upper arms, and lower B-arms, while steering gets an upgrade courtesy of a stiffer torsion bar.

There are still Normal and Sport drive modes, but an Individual mode has been added. That allows the driver to choose their mix of engine response, steering weight, and instrumentation theme settings.

Outside, there’s a new upper front bumper, a reworked rear bumper with twin oval exhaust tips, a front spoiler, and a gloss black rear spoiler. More gloss black appears on the mirrors and window surrounds, and Honda makes LED lighting front and rear standard, too. 18-inch 10-spoke alloy wheels – in an Si-specific matte black – are standard, too, and the Blazing Orange Pearl paint is exclusive to the car as well.

Inside, Si-exclusive sport seats with integrated head restraints and more shoulder and lower thigh support are included, along with sport pedals and red contrast stitching. The honeycomb dash panel is carried over, but with red trim now. A 7-inch driver display and 9-inch infotainment touchscreen are standard, with wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Honda also adds the 12-speaker Bose audio system, and Honda Sensing is standard, too.

Pricing will be confirmed closer to the 2022 Civic Si’s arrival in dealerships later in 2021.

Continue Reading

Cars

Toyota Tacozilla inspired by 1970s Chinook campervans to debut at SEMA

Published

on

We bet you haven’t heard of the Toyota Chinook campervan, but we’re pretty sure you’ll be looking forward to Toyota’s Tacozilla campervan concept at this year’s SEMA show in November. The Toyota Chinook is a collaboration between the Japanese automaker and American wagon maker Chinook RV. The first Toyota Chinooks entered the market in 1973 and were essentially motorhomes with a pop-up roof built on a long-wheelbase Toyota half-ton truck chassis.

And since it’s a Toyota, Chinook campervans have the same bulletproof reliability as Toyota trucks. The folks at Toyota’s motorsports tech center in Texas created Tacozilla with the Chinook in mind, but it now has a more contemporary design to cope with seriously rugged terrain.

Starting with a Toyota Tacoma TRD Sport manual, the team conceptualized a bed-mounted micro-house with a cab-over design and a stubby rear end to lessen the approach and departure angles, making it effortless to find a suitable camping spot in the wild outdoors. According to project manager Marty Schwerter, Tacozilla will be sleeker, more aerodynamic, and more fuel-efficient than any Toyota Chinook before it, not to mention more off-road capable than ever before.

Toyota claims the camper is tall enough for a six-foot two-inch person to stand while cooking meals in the built-in kitchenette. The home quarters will also have a table, a standard toilet, and a two-person bed. Tacozilla will also come in a unique retro-inspired red, white, and orange livery as those vintage Chinook campervans. “Racecars are cool looking,” added Schwerter. “I want campers to be cool looking, too.”

And while the old Chinooks were motivated by Toyota’s 18R motor, Tacozilla will have a standard 3.5-liter V6 engine with 278 horsepower and 265 pound-feet of torque. The initial rendering also features unique off-road wheels and chunkier Cooper Discoverer all-terrain tires.

Unlike other concepts, the Toyota Tacozilla is as real as it gets. The automaker is working overtime in finishing the prototype just in time for the 2021 SEMA Show this November 2 to 5, 2021. The question is, can we expect Tacozillas at Toyota dealerships soon? If Toyota did it in the early 1970s, we could see no reason it won’t be doing it again. But will Tacozilla be as cool as those retrolicious Chinook camper vans? We’ll have to wait for SEMA to find out.

Continue Reading

Trending