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TPG takes out third NBN speed-monitoring report

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TPG has taken out the third National Broadband Network (NBN) speed-monitoring report, with MyRepublic again coming last across most categories.

According to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) report [PDF], TPG delivered 88.7 percent of its maximum plan speeds overall and 88.4 percent during busy hours for downloads.

It was followed by Aussie Broadband — the winner of the previous report — at 87 percent overall and 85.8 percent in busy hours; iiNet, at 85.9 percent overall and 84.8 percent in busy hours; Optus, at 84.9 percent overall and 84 percent in busy hours; Telstra, at 83.9 percent overall and 83.5 percent in busy hours; and MyRepublic, at 83.5 percent overall and 82.1 percent in busy hours.

TPG likewise scored highest on average upload speeds, providing 89.2 percent of its maximum plan speeds overall and 89.1 percent during busy hours.

Aussie Broadband was ranked second for upload speeds, providing 87.8 percent overall and 87.5 percent during busy hours; iiNet was third, providing 87.1 percent both overall and during busy hours; MyRepublic came fourth, at 85.3 percent overall and 84.6 percent in busy hours; Telstra was fifth, providing 83.2 percent overall and 83.1 percent in busy hours; and Optus came in last, with 82.8 percent overall and 82.7 percent in busy hours.

“Industry says it is working hard to contact customers whose NBN connections aren’t able to deliver the maximum speeds of their plan,” ACCC Chair Rod Sims said on Monday morning.

“We note NBN Co has reported that congestion has increased slightly in recent months. Our results suggest that ISPs not featured in this report could be contributing to this, as the overall results featured in this MBA report do not show an upward trend in congestion.”

Telstra again had the lowest latency, at 12.1 milliseconds overall and an average web page-loading time of 2.4 seconds. TPG’s overall latency was 12.4ms; Aussie Broadband’s was 13.5ms; Optus’ was 14.1ms; iiNet’s was 16.2ms; and MyRepublic’s was 17.1ms.

Average page-loading time for iiNet and MyRepublic was 2.6 seconds; Aussie Broadband clocked 2.7 seconds; Optus 3 seconds; and TPG 3.2 seconds.

The “very busy hours” metric — which takes the fifth-lowest hourly average speed measure during the 120 busy hours of the period — again saw poor results, with Telstra pulling down the highest score by providing just 71.9 percent of maximum plan speeds.

Aussie Broadband followed, providing 69.3 percent of maximum plan speeds during very busy hours, then TPG, at 69.2 percent; Optus, at 68.4 percent; iiNet, at 66.9 percent; and MyRepublic, at 61.1 percent.

Upload speeds during very busy hours were best delivered by TPG, at 82.5 percent, followed by Aussie Broadband, at 81.4 percent; iiNet, at 80.5 percent; Telstra, at 78.9 percent; Optus, at 77 percent; and MyRepublic, at 76 percent.

Aussie Broadband co-founder and MD Phillip Britt last week told ZDNet that the speed-monitoring reports — in conjunction with NBN’s Focus on 50 wholesale pricing discount and the mandate that RSPs advertise typical evening speeds — is “really what cleaned up the big boys behaving badly” in terms of provisioning enough connectivity virtual circuit (CVC) capacity.

“Ultimately, they weren’t provisioning enough CVC; they basically were going to get caught with their pants down,” Britt told ZDNet.

“NBN needed to fix the customer experience. NBN ultimately blinked first, rather than the providers provisioning more bandwidth.

“It eroded our competitive advantage overnight, because we were provisioning enough bandwidth, and suddenly everyone was on this level playing field from a bandwidth perspective … we’ve still come out on top [of the second ACCC report], but the whole congestion thing was a massive selling point for us, and customers were churning to us in droves because of that. The churn in market these days is not as strong, I think because of that.”

The ACCC’s first fixed-line broadband speed monitoring report, published in March, had followed the consumer watchdog forcing Telstra, Optus, TPG, iiNet, Internode, Dodo, iPrimus, and Commander to compensate tens of thousands of customers for not providing them with the NBN speeds they were paying for.

The ACCC is still seeking volunteers for the broadband speed-monitoring program in order to increase the pool of data.

The AU$6.5 million speed-monitoring program will take place over four years, with SamKnows appointed in December last year to monitor speeds thanks to the government providing funding.

The ACCC has also said it would need an additional AU$6 million in government funding to extend its speed-monitoring program to fixed-wireless services.

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How To Build Your Own Retro Gaming Console With A Raspberry Pi

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Once your micro SD card is mounted with RetroPie, you can plug it into your fully assembled Raspberry Pi 4 and begin the setup process in the software menu that appears. Make sure your controller is nearby, as you’ll need it during the first boot process. If you’re using a USB controller, make sure it’s connected physically, then follow the instructions on-screen.

If you’re using a Bluetooth controller, tap F4 on your USB keyboard to exit back into the Linux command prompt screen, then type and execute the command “sudo ~/RetroPie-S etup/retropie-setup.sh” that loads you into a backend RetroPie menu. Navigate to the Bluetooth option and then open it to begin searching for a controller. Set your Bluetooth controller to sync mode, then pair it in the menu. Return to the Linux command prompt and type the command “sudo shutdown -r now”. Upon loading back into RetroPie, you should be able to use your Bluetooth controller by simply turning it on and following the on-screen menu. Once everything is complete, you’ll end up on another menu with the option RASPI-CONFIG, which you should now select.

Upon tapping that option, you’ll be taken to the main configuration menu for RetroPie, which includes all sorts of different settings. Go ahead and configure whichever settings you need. It’s also a good idea to navigate to Advanced Settings and disable Overscan if you’re using an HDTV. From here, you should be able to load your ROMs (stored on your SD card) and play them from the menu that appears when you boot up RetroPie. Check out the RetroPie documentation for troubleshooting any issues you may encounter, and happy gaming!

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Today’s Wordle Answer #377 – July 1, 2022 Word Solution And Hints

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The solution for the July 1, 2022, edition of Wordle is pinto. It made its way to the English vocabulary from the Spanish word pinto, which refers to a subject that is spotted or mottled. Horses with a patchy coloration, especially those rocking white patches, are affectionately known as pinto.

The word traces its etymological roots to the Latin term pinctus, which is used to describe something that has been painted over. The pinto bean, which is a staple in Mexican, Spanish, and Brazilian cuisines, also gets its name from the patchy color profile of its outer skin. According to Ancestry data, Pinto is a popular Catalan name that eventually made its way to the Indian subcontinent with the advent of Portuguese invaders.

Interestingly, it is also used to describe a person with greying hair, something pop culture describes as a salt-and-pepper look. You can trace the history of Pinto family migration across the U.S. and Canada in the 19th century here. As for famous personalities with that surname, the actress described above is Freida Pinto, while the footballer in question is José Manuel Pinto. Meanwhile, Fernão Mendes Pinto was a renowned Portuguese explorer and writer who also has a crater on the planet Mercury named after him.

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This New $6 Raspberry Pi Is The Computer The DIY Smart Home Needs

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In terms of hardware, the Raspberry Pi Pico W is identical to its predecessor; it sports the same RP2040 Arm Cortex M0+ Dual-Core SoC, which is based on TSMC’s 40nm low power manufacturing process. This chip clocks up to 133MHz and also packs in 264KB of SRAM. There is 2MB of onboard flash storage thrown in, as well. Additionally, the machine features a 40-pin GPIO just like the original Pico from 2021. The onboard micro USB controller can be used for data transfer and receiving power.

The Wi-Fi module on the Raspberry Pi Pico is the Infineon CYW43439 wireless that, apart from supporting 2.4GHz Wi-Fi networks, also adds Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low-Energy support. However, as of now, Raspberry has chosen not to enable Bluetooth capability in the machine. The company does not rule out the possibility of enabling Bluetooth further down the line, though.

With over 2 million Raspberry Pi Pico boards in the hands of consumers, the company expects its new model to enjoy similar success. The company also believes that the ongoing chip shortage has been among the prime reasons for the popularity of the RP2040-based Raspberry Pi Pico. The Pico W, thanks to its newfound wireless capability, will continue to be a great product that can power many IoT-based applications and DIY smart home needs. With a price tag of $6, the Raspberry Pi Pico W costs just $2 more than its predecessor. As the ecosystem for starter microcontrollers evolves, the $6 you spend on the Pico W will definitely be a worthwhile investment.

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