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Using Huawei for 5G is an unnecessary risk, says former spy chief

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Why UK plans to use Huawei tech in 5G networks despite US pressure
A complex set of considerations will have informed the UK’s decision-making around 5G. Read more: https://zd.net/2GVpVWs

Using equipment from Chinese telecoms company Huawei in the UK’s 5G networks could create risks that the country does not need to take, the former chief of MI6 has warned.

Richard Dearlove said, in the forward to a report by the Henry Jackson Society thinktank, the fact that the UK government “now appears to have decided to place the development of some its most sensitive critical infrastructure in the hands of a company from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) is deeply worrying”.

Mobile operators are at the early stages of building out the 5G networks that will provide the bandwidth for not just faster smartphone downloads but also, in future, a range of new services from smart cities and the Internet of Things to self-driving cars.

SEE: IT pro’s guide to the evolution and impact of 5G technology (free PDF)

It’s because of these new services that security has suddenly become a critical factor. The concern is not simply that hostile powers could snoop on data running over these networks but that they could even stop the services built on top from functioning smoothly.

The US in particular has grown increasingly concerned that a Chinese company would be providing much of the technology for these networks. It banned Huawei from government contracts back in 2014 and has been putting pressure on allies to do the same. But last month a leak from the UK government suggested that the country was going to allow the Chinese networking company to provide at least some 5G infrastructure, on the basis that the risk of using Huawei kit can be managed.

But Dearlove said since China conducts aggressive intelligence gathering operations on a global scale, and since no part of the Chinese state is ultimately able to operate outside of the control of its Communist Party, “Therefore, we must conclude the engagement of Huawei presents a potential security risk to the UK.”

Dealove said that the introduction of 5G networks is a major technology change, which will have far-reaching implications for the UK’s national security and almost every aspect of the country’s civic life.

“The ability to control communications and the data that flows through its channels will be the route to exercise power over societies and other nations,” he said.

He said that to place China in a potentially advantageous exploitative position in the UK’s future telecommunications systems “is a risk, however remote it may seem at the moment, we simply do not need to take.”

He added the UK should also not be influenced by the economic cost of either delaying 5G or having to settle for a less capable and more expensive provider. “If Australia can black ball Huawei as its 5G provider, the UK can certainly do so the same without undue concern about the consequences,” he said.

SEE: A winning strategy for cybersecurity (ZDNet special report) Download the report as a PDF (TechRepublic)

The former spy chief was not alone in his criticism. “If we make the wrong decision about allowing hostile agencies access to our critical national infrastructure, history will judge us harshly,” warned MP Julian Lewis, chair of the Defence Select Committee.

A Huawei spokesperson hit back: “We are an independent, employee-owned company which does not take instructions from the Chinese government. In 32 years, there have been no significant cybersecurity issues with our equipment. We hope and expect that any decision on Huawei’s participation in Britain’s build-out of 5G networks will be based on solid evidence, rather than on unfounded speculation and groundless accusations.”

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Check out the 2+2 Chevrolet Corvette that never was

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The 60s was an iconic era in the automotive realm in the United States, with some incredibly popular cars getting their start then Vehicles like the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro, Chevrolet Corvette, and Dodge Charger, to name a few. Sometimes it takes one vehicle to change the industry and spawn many similar products from the other automakers. Case in point is Ford and its Mustang, which kicked off the pony car era eliciting responses with other iconic vehicles.

Another of the iconic Ford vehicles in the era that sold extremely well was the Thunderbird. The Thunderbird routinely outsold the Chevrolet Corvette. Early in its production, the Thunderbird was a two-seat sports car very similar to the Corvette. It grew in later generations, becoming a 2+2, offering a back seat to carry more passengers. The vehicle in the image above looks like the iconic 60s split-window Corvettes that are so valuable today, but there’s a key difference.

The difference is readily apparent when you look at the side view image in the Instagram post below, where General Motors Design shared photos of a one-off design buck. A design buck is essentially the shell of the vehicle used by automotive designers of the day to get the vehicle’s design just right. This particular example was never powered and never cruised the streets.

The car was a response to the Thunderbird, adding backseats to the Corvette in 1962. Sadly, the 2+2 Corvette was never built, and reports indicate the design buck was later crushed. Another interesting tidbit is that GM reportedly brought in a Ferrari to help with the styling and proportions of the car.

As for what finally became of the project, a GM executive named Bunkie Knudsen, who was part of the styling team but wasn’t a fan of the project, reportedly worked to get the project scrapped. He believed it would taint the Corvette brand and wouldn’t sell in large enough numbers to justify building it. The only Corvettes ever sold by GM have all been two-seat sports cars.

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Alpha Motors Superwolf is a completely decked out electric pickup

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Alpha Motors unveiled a new version of its all-electric pickup called the Superwolf. The difference between this particular version of the truck and the ones that have been shown before is that the Superwolf is completely decked out with all sorts of accessories you might expect to find only on the aftermarket. One of the more interesting accessories seen on the truck is tube doors similar to what you commonly see on Jeeps.

Superwolf also has custom KMC wheels with large off-road tires, a custom front bumper with tow rings and skid plates, as well as a complete roof rack featuring an LED light bar and large locking case. In the bed of the truck is a rack that adds more style to the truck and supports the roof basket.

Under the doors are also compact step rails that look like they are intended to protect the vehicle’s body while off-roading. The truck also features wide fender flares and looks fantastic in general. Other interesting features of the truck include a bed cover that appears to be made out of aluminum and a rack that spans the bed allowing for items to be attached on top of the bed itself.

Several other accessories are available for the truck, including a bed extension and more. Other than the accessories, Superwolf features a driving range of up to 300 miles per charge. It has two motors for four-wheel drive and can reach 60 mph in 6.5 seconds. The truck has a tow rating of 6724 pounds and features a rapid charger with battery cooling and heating.

The truck’s interior can hold four passengers and has a digital display for the driver along with the wide-format center display. Bluetooth connectivity and premium sound are also featured. Superwolf can be reserved now with a starting MSRP listed at between $48,000 and $56,000.

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Classic 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Trans Am racer heads to auction

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When it comes to muscle cars of the 60s, one of the most iconic is the Chevrolet Camaro. The value of a normal Chevrolet Camaro from the era is often very high. The value of this 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Trans Am is even higher as it’s an actual successful racing car from the era. This vehicle is the first of six Sunoco Trans Am Camaros that Penske Racing built.

This particular car has an extensive racing history with drivers Mark Donohue and George Follmer behind the wheel. The car has been completely restored by Kevin McKay in its iconic Sunoco racing livery. The car is said to be one of the most significant Chevrolet-powered racing cars ever built. Because of its rarity and racing pedigree, the car is expected to bring as much as $2 million at auction in Pebble Beach.

The car features a 302 cubic inch overhead valve V-8 engine and a single four-barrel carburetor. It’s estimated to produce 450 horsepower and has a four-speed manual gearbox along with four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. The front suspension is independent wishbone with coil springs, while the rear has a live axle with leaf springs, a setup common in the era.

The racing series the car was built for required a 302 cubic-inch engine. The Z/28 was born due to the need to produce examples for homologation. The Z/28 became the Camaro performance production model, with 602 examples being built in 1967. The first 25 of those cars off the assembly line were sent to racers. This particular car was the 14th produced and was sent to Roger Penske.

This car is the first of only six Penske Camaros built between 1967 and 1969. The auction house says that over $330,000 was spent to restore the iconic car completely. The car comes with a file documenting its extensive racing history and photos of the car as it was discovered and during its restoration.

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