Connect with us

Cars

Vertiv chosen to build Sunshine Coast subsea cable landing station

Published

on


(Image: Sunshine Coast Council)

Australia’s Sunshine Coast Council has announced that Vertiv will be building the AU$6.6 million cable landing station for the Sunshine Coast International Broadband Submarine Cable, which will connect to the Japan-Guam-Australia South (JGA-S) submarine cable.

Vertiv won the tender to design and build the cable landing station in Maroochydore after saying it would use local contractors for the project, the council said.

The council has set aside AU$35 million in total to build out the 550km Sunshine Coast International Broadband Submarine Cable, including AU$15 million in funding from the Queensland government’s Jobs and Regional Growth Fund.

According to Sunshine Coast Mayor Mark Jamieson, the cable will provide the fastest broadband connection between Australia and Asia.

“Our Sunshine Coast is fast becoming a digital leader and the submarine cable network will help to position our region as a key digital trading location from Australia,” Jamieson said on Friday.

“Today’s commitment with Vertiv helps us to ensure the delivery of the international submarine cable connection is on track to be operational in 2020.”

The cable landing station, which will be built to house four submarine cables, is also “designed to reflect the vision for the Maroochydore city centre”, Jamieson said, instead of the “anonymous nondescript” design usually used for such structures.

Announced in September, the Sunshine Coast cable is being built in partnership with RTI Connectivity (RTI-C), with the 9,600km JGA-S cable connecting to the SEA-US cable system between the United States, South-East Asia, and the HK-G system between Guam and Hong Kong.

According to the local council, its submarine cable project should provide 864 new jobs in the area, as well as stimulating AU$927 million in investment in Queensland.

Vertiv Australia and New Zealand MD Robert Linsdell added that the cable will enable more Internet of Things (IoT) and smart cities applications for the region.

“Once again, our council is at the forefront of thinking outside the square, securing new revenue sources and pursuing opportunities to generate economic and employment growth as a major dividend for our residents, thus ensuring we continue to be Australia’s healthy, smart, creative region,” Jamieson said back in September.

“To have all Australian east-coast international cables landing in Sydney is not only more expensive, it’s a huge business and national security risk if those cables are damaged at the same time.”

RTI-C, which is the sole developer of the northern portion of the JGA cable and in partnership with Google and AARNet for the southern part, said the Queensland connection would be faster than the one in Sydney.

“This new path will deliver traffic into and out of Australia faster than the Sydney route because it is geographically closer to mainland China and Hong Kong, where there are over 1.1 billion people,” RTI-C CEO Russ Matulich said.

The JGA was announced by Google in April, with two fibre pairs to connect Minami-Boso, Japan, to Piti, Guam, and two fibre pairs to connect Piti to Sydney. The cable has a design capacity of more than 36Tbps.

It is being built by NEC and Alcatel Submarine Networks, and is due to be complete by the first half of 2020.

Subsea cables across the globe

  • Vocus’ Australia-Singapore Cable (ASC)
  • Vocus’ North West Cable System (NWCS) between Darwin and Port Hedland, and the new Tiwi Islands spur being added
  • The Australian government’s Coral Sea subsea cable, being constructed by Vocus to connect Australia, Papua New Guinea, and Solomon Islands and funded through the foreign aid budget
  • Google’s Dunant transatlantic subsea cable between Virginia Beach in the United States to the French Atlantic coast
  • The Indigo subsea cable system being built by Telstra, SubPartners, Google, Singtel, AARNet, Indosat Ooredoo, and Alcatel Submarine Networks, connecting Sydney, Perth, Singapore, and Jakarta
  • The Indian government’s Chennai-Andaman and Nicobar islands subsea cable, being built by NEC
  • Southern Cross Cables’ NEXT subsea cable system between Australia, New Zealand, and the United States, being built by SubPartners
  • The Trident subsea cable system connecting Perth with Singapore via Indonesia
  • The Jupiter subsea cable connecting the US, Japan, and the Philippines and being built by a consortium including Facebook, Amazon, SoftBank, NTT Com, PLDT, and PCCW
  • The Hawaiki subsea cable between Australia, New Zealand, and the US
  • Superloop’s Hong Kong cable
  • Telstra’s Hong Kong Americas (HKA) cable between Hong Kong and the US
  • The Pacific Light Cable Network (PLCN) between Hong Kong and the US
  • Google’s Japan-Guam-Australia (JGA) cable system
  • The Asia-Pacific Gateway (APG) subsea cable connecting China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, and Singapore, owned by a consortium including China Telecom, China Unicom, China Mobile, NTT Communications, KT Corporation, LG Uplus, StarHub, Chunghwa Telecom, CAT, Global Transit Communications, Viettel, and VNPT, and being constructed by NEC
  • The Southeast Asia Japan 2 cable (SJC2), which will have 11 landing stations in Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Hong Kong, China, South Korea, Taiwan, and Japan, being built by NEC and funded by a consortium including China Mobile International, Chunghwa Telecom, Chuan Wei, Facebook, KDDI, Singtel, SK Broadband, and VNPT
  • The Bay to Bay Express Cable System (BtoBE), connecting Singapore and Hong Kong with the US, being funded by consortium including Facebook, Amazon Web Services (AWS), and China Mobile International, and being built by NEC
  • The South Atlantic Cable System (SACS) connecting Angola and Brazil, going live in October 2018 after being built by NEC
  • The PNG subsea cable network being built by Huawei

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cars

The Best Features Of The Aston Martin Vulcan

Published

on

Although the Vulcan was specifically designed not to be road legal, one owner decided that they wanted to stick on some license plates and take it on the highway anyway. Except, it was far from that simple, as the conversion process required making some major changes to the car, and cost several hundred thousand dollars on top of the original purchase price (via Motor1). The street conversion was handled by RML Group but had full support from the Aston Martin factory, and after completion, it became the only road-legal Vulcan in existence.

Among the litany of changes required were the addition of windshield wipers, side mirrors, and a central locking system. Michelin road tires were also fitted, and a new set of headlights had to be installed to meet height requirements for British roads. The bladed tail lights were also covered over for safety, and a few of the sharper surface edges around the cabin were smoothed out. Then, the engine was remapped to meet emissions requirements, the suspension was softened, and a lift system was installed to give the car extra clearance for speed bumps. After all that, plus a few final touches, a license plate was fitted and the car was ready to go. Unfortunately, it seems like the owner’s enthusiasm for taking it on the road quickly evaporated, as checking the car’s plates against the British government database shows that its MOT (the annual national roadworthiness test) certificate expired back in January 2022.

Continue Reading

Cars

5 Cars Owned By Bob Seger That Prove He Has Great Taste

Published

on

Pulling into the final spot on the list is a 1969 Shelby Cobra GT350 Fastback. This particular car is unique for a few reasons. First, it was the last “new original” Shelby that Ford would produce. The GT350 and GT500 released in 1970 weren’t actually new or original but re-VIN’d production cars from the previous year. Also, during the summer of ’69, Carrol Shelby ended his association with Ford (via MustangSpecs).

It had one of Ford’s new 351 Windsor V8 engines with a 470 CFM four-barrel Autolite carburetor under the hood that pounded out 290hp and 385 lb-ft of torque. Its 0 – 60 time was a modest 6.5 seconds, and it did the quarter mile in 14.9 seconds (via MustangSpecs).

According to MustangSpecs, it was typically mated to a 4-speed manual transmission, but Seger’s had a Tremec 6-speed stick instead (via Mecum Auctions). Seger’s Candy Apple Red GT350 had Ford’s upgraded interior package, flaunting a landscape of imitation teak wood covering the dash, steering wheel, door accents, and center console trim (via MustangSpecs).

According to Mecum Auctions, Seger’s was number 42 of 935. When it sold at auction in 2013 for $65,000, it noted that it had been displayed at the Henry Ford Museum at the Rock Stars, Cars & Guitars Exhibit.

Continue Reading

Cars

Here’s What Made Volkswagen’s Air-Cooled Engine So Special

Published

on

Engines like the Chevy Small Block, Ford 5.0, Chrysler HEMI, and Toyota 2JZ are known for power, torque, and how quickly they can propel a hunk of steel down the drag strip or around the corners of a track. The Volkswagen air-cooled engine is remembered amongst people who have owned one as reliable, easy to maintain, and as numerous as grains of sand on the beach. VW made literally tens of millions of the engine, including over 21 million in just the Beetle (via Autoweek). 

It’s difficult to nail down specific aspects of the engine’s early history as sources tend to disagree on years. But the engine can be traced back to very early Volkswagen models designed with help from Ferdinand Porsche and built in the late-1930s to early 1940s in Nazi Germany. Official sources from Volkswagen are reluctant to acknowledge use of the engine or even the existence of the Beetle prior to the end of World War II.

Continue Reading

Trending