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What top enterprise VCs are thinking, using data effectively, ethics, Light, and Flipkart – TechCrunch

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Top VCs on the changing landscape for enterprise startups

TechCrunch had our debut confab for enterprise types this week at Yerba Buena Center in SF, where we heard from Aaron Levie, CEO of Box, Apple VP Susan Prescott of Apple, and Microsoft Azure CTO Mark Russinovich. We were sold out, which perhaps isn’t all that surprising given the amount of interest in enterprise these days. Expect more events to come.

Our Silicon Valley editor Connie Loizos hosted a panel with leading enterprise VCs, and she selected the most interesting points from that conversation and from her calls with them for Extra Crunch members. Hear a bit from Jason Green of Emergence Capital, Rebecca Lynn of Canvas Ventures and Maha Ibrahim of Canaan Partners and what they are investing in these days.

And if you want to hear even more from Jason Green and yours truly, head over to TechCrunch’s VC podcast Equity, where we shot live from Yerba Buena along with host Kate Clark with a special focus on enterprise startups.

Maha Ibrahim: I feel like people are focusing too much on metrics and not as much on [the total addressable market]. We make money [when a startup strikes on a] huge, huge market.

But there’s [also] so much correlation between consumer and enterprise startups in that we want customers that love the product. We want customers that come back and come back and come back to us, without us having to pay for them to come back. So the equivalent in a consumer company would be me having to spend advertising dollars to acquire that customer again, as opposed to that customer just coming back because he or she loves what I’m doing. The same goes for the enterprise.

How early-stage startups can use data effectively

Silicon Valley may be obsessed with using data to improve startup outcomes, but the reality is quite a bit more nuanced. Koen Bok, co-founder of interactive design tool Framer, has put together an extensive guide here on how to to use data — and when not to.

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2023 Dodge Hornet Crossover Revealed With PHEV Power And Sub-$30k Price

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If you’re trying to save money at the gas station, the Dodge Hornet R/T offers 30 miles of all-electric range alongside the kind of fuel economy a hybrid provides. The batteries can be topped up at any charging station, hence the “plug-in” part of a plug-in hybrid. While operating in tandem with the electric motors, the car’s 1.3-liter engine is capable of producing over 285 horsepower and 383 lb-ft of torque. That makes it the most powerful hybrid utility vehicle on the market. All of that power is put through a six-speed automatic transmission, and several driving modes are available depending on your style and needs.

The powershot feature, which is activated by holding down the gear shift paddles and performing a pedal kickdown, is exclusive to the R/T. It provides a 25-horsepower boost and gives instant access to every bit of torque your drivetrain has, so it’s ideal for when you need a quick start. Powershot can be activated while in sport mode, a setting that sharpens the throttle, optimizes the gear shifts, and trades economy for raw performance. There is also a hybrid mode, all-electric mode, and e-save mode.

If you’re the type of person that will only drive a regular gas-powered vehicle, you haven’t been left out — that’s what the Hornet GT is. It has a turbocharged 2-liter inline 4-cylinder engine capable of producing upwards of 295 lb-ft of torque. All of that goes through a nine-speed electronic transmission. Like its semi-electric brother, the GT includes a sport mode for those times you really want a performance boost. Both vehicles also come with all-wheel drive as standard, though the R/T’s is a little bit better, as it can power all four wheels independently.

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The Real Reason The US Cancelled This Multi-Billion Dollar Helicopter Project

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Prior to UAVs like the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper capturing the public’s attention during the War on Terror, stealth aircraft were all the rage. Aircraft like the B2 Spirit showed the potential for stealth attack aircraft. The RAH-66 Comanche was supposed to follow that same trend. 

The Comanche was a joint venture by Sikorsky and Boeing and was originally intended to act as a reconnaissance aircraft and pinpoint targets of interest, according to Boeing. 

Looking like a PlayStation One render of a helicopter, the Comanche was designed to operate stealthily. Its angular body panels allowed it to fly into enemy territory virtually undetected. The Comanche was not designed to be a flying weapons platform like the AH-64 Apache, but it wasn’t a slouch either. It boasted a 20mm chin gun and the wing pylons could be equipped with air-to-air or air-to-ground missiles (via Hotcars).

With nearly 20 years of hindsight, it’s easy to see why the military favored drones over the stealth wizardry of the Comanche. But back then, a stealth helicopter was the future of warfare.  

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American Airlines New Supersonic Jets Could Slash Flight Times In Half

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Being built to travel at Mach 1.7, or about 1,304 miles per hour (when traveling over water), the Overture would get passengers to their destinations much faster than the average commercial flight. Though one of its primary trade-offs is capacity, as Boom says the jet can only manage between 65 to 80 passengers at a time. That’s roughly half of the commonly-used Airbus A320’s 140 to 170 passenger capacity or the 149 to 220 maximum seating of the Boeing 737 series. Though on paper the Overture does boast more range — up to 4,250 nautical miles — than either of its mass transit contemporaries.

A ride in an Overture aircraft should also be just as safe as today’s typical flights, with Boom on the hook to make sure the new plane meets the current industry standards. Additionally, the new models will also have to meet American’s own requirements even before it delivers its first plane.

If all goes according to plan, Boom should begin rolling out manufactured Overtures sometime in 2025. It expects to start carrying passengers by 2029. So far nothing has been said about the availability of Overture flights to American Airline customers once it has the planes in hand, nor anything about ticket pricing.

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