Connect with us

Internet

Windows 10 Task Scheduler Zero-Day Vulnerability Exploit Leaked, Can Help Gain Admin-Level Access

Published

on

Windows 10 has been hit by yet another zero-day vulnerability that can allow malicious parties to gain admin-level privileges. The yet unnamed zero-day vulnerability can be exploited to break into a system and gain full control over it. The newly discovered threat to Microsoft’s operating system can be classified as a Local Privilege Escalation (LPE) that can help hackers change the privilege level of an account to admin level, and it is associated with the native Task Scheduler process. The exploit can reportedly work on previous versions like Windows XP and Windows Server as well.

The vulnerability was spotted by a security researcher going by the name SandboxEscaper, the same person who also discovered another zero-day vulnerability affecting the Microsoft Data Sharing service last year. SandboxEscaper shared the demo exploit code for the vulnerability on Github, which is a little ironic since Github is owned by Microsoft, alongside a proof-of-concept video detailing the process of exploiting the flaw.

As mentioned above, the vulnerability is associated with the Windows Task Scheduler process wherein bad actors can run a malicious command to promote the account level from low-privilege to admin control level. Once admin access is achieved, the malicious party can gain control over the entire system and target other system files. Will Dormann, a vulnerability analyst at CERT, has confirmed that the exploit is functional even on the latest Windows 10 May 2019 build. The exploit affects 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows 10, Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019.

Theoretically, the flaw can reportedly be exploited on all versions of Windows such as Windows XP, and dating all the way back to Windows Server 2003. The vulnerability is yet to be patched, which means it is open to exploit. SandboxEscaper also claims to have discovered four more unpatched Windows bugs, with three of them being LPEs and the last one being associated with the Sandbox process.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Internet

Loon harnesses Google AI to deploy a reinforcement learning navigation system

Published

on

Loon is a company that’s been working on a project for a while aiming to use superpressure balloons floating in the stratosphere to deliver Internet connectivity. We don’t hear about the project very often, and some may wonder if it is still relevant with SpaceX already in trials with its Starlink Internet service using satellites. Loon has deployed something very … Continue reading

Continue Reading

Internet

Pixel 5 durability test digs for the metal under thick plastic

Published

on

While Google is an excellent software developer and advertiser, its luck with hardware products has been rather hit or miss. Its own smartphones, in particular, are hailed for their “pure” Android experience but often criticized for their hardware quality. The Pixel 5 didn’t escape that curse, with reports of the screen slightly separating from its frame. But while Google strangely … Continue reading

Continue Reading

Internet

ecobee SmartCamera adds iCloud storage via HomeKit Secure Video

Published

on

The explosion of smart home products from various manufactures pretty much mirrored a similar scenario when mobile phones landed on the market. Each one communicated only with others from the same brand unless some third-party platform tries to orchestrate the communication between different devices. Apple HomeKit is one such smart home platform and brands like ecobee are only too happy … Continue reading

Continue Reading

Trending